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Possible Duplicate:
Can you call Directory.GetFiles() with multiple filters?

How do you filter on more than one extension?

I've tried:

FileInfo[] Files = dinfo.GetFiles("*.jpg;*.tiff;*.bmp");
FileInfo[] Files = dinfo.GetFiles("*.jpg,*.tiff,*.bmp");
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marked as duplicate by casperOne May 24 '12 at 12:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I guess you mean "more than one extension"... it doesn't work with two either –  Thomas Levesque Aug 20 '10 at 0:05
    
yeup doesn't work for two either –  rd42 Aug 20 '10 at 0:12
    
BTW, are you aware that GetFiles is not related to C#, but only related to .NET? –  John Saunders Aug 20 '10 at 0:14
    
@JohnSaunders, are you sure about this? –  Vikram Narkar Jun 18 at 6:34
    
@VikramNarkar: yes. You won't find it in the C# Reference, and it works equally well from VB.NET or any other CLR language. –  John Saunders Jun 18 at 17:17

8 Answers 8

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Why not create an extension method? That's more readable.

public static IEnumerable<FileInfo> GetFilesByExtensions(this DirectoryInfo dir, params string[] extensions)
{
    if (extensions == null) 
         throw new ArgumentNullException("extensions");
    IEnumerable<FileInfo> files = Enumerable.Empty<FileInfo>();
    foreach(string ext in extensions)
    {
       files = files.Concat(dir.GetFiles(ext));
    }
    return files;
}

EDIT: a more efficient version:

public static IEnumerable<FileInfo> GetFilesByExtensions(this DirectoryInfo dir, params string[] extensions)
{
    if (extensions == null) 
         throw new ArgumentNullException("extensions");
    IEnumerable<FileInfo> files = dir.EnumerateFiles();
    return files.Where(f => extensions.Contains(f.Extension));
}

Usage:

dInfo.GetFilesByExtensions(".jpg",".exe",".gif");
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5  
This is inefficient. –  SLaks Nov 8 '10 at 13:44
    
@Slaks: emm..it's better if I get all the files first and then filter it with different extensions. –  Danny Chen Nov 8 '10 at 14:59
2  
Yes. See my answer. Also, you ought to call SelectMany instead of Concat: return extensions.SelectMany(dir.GetFiles); –  SLaks Nov 8 '10 at 15:33
1  
Rather than checking the extension as shown above, you can use the first example and pass the search pattern into EnumerateFiles and still be able to use checks against the filename rather than only being able to inspect the extension while retaining the efficiency of the 2nd example. –  Jeff Winn Mar 8 '12 at 16:42
    
To avoid missing Capital Written Extensions I would add a StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase to the Contains-Method. return files.Where(f => extensions.Contains(f.Extension, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase)); –  Doc Snuggles Nov 12 '13 at 11:14

You can get every file, then filter the array:

public static IEnumerable<FileInfo> GetFilesByExtensions(this DirectoryInfo dirInfo, params string[] extensions)
{
    var allowedExtensions = new HashSet<string>(extensions, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);

    return dirInfo.EnumerateFiles()
                  .Where(f => allowedExtensions.Contains(f.Extension));
}

This will be (marginally) faster than every other answer here.
In .Net 3.5, replace EnumerateFiles with GetFiles (which is slower).

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You can't do that, because GetFiles only accepts a single search pattern. Instead, you can call GetFiles with no pattern, and filter the results in code:

string[] extensions = new[] { ".jpg", ".tiff", ".bmp" };

FileInfo[] files =
    dinfo.GetFiles()
         .Where(f => extensions.Contains(f.Extension.ToLower()))
         .ToArray();

If you're working with .NET 4, you can use the EnumerateFiles method to avoid loading all FileInfo objects in memory at once:

string[] extensions = new[] { ".jpg", ".tiff", ".bmp" };

FileInfo[] files =
    dinfo.EnumerateFiles()
         .Where(f => extensions.Contains(f.Extension.ToLower()))
         .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I used the .NET 4 and got the following error. I'm new to this, so apologies is this is an obvious fix: Error 4 'bool' does not contain a definition for 'ToArray' and no extension method 'ToArray' accepting a first argument of type 'bool' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  rd42 Aug 20 '10 at 0:37
    
A closing bracket was missing, I fixed it –  Thomas Levesque Aug 20 '10 at 1:02
    
Exactly.EnumerateFiles() is better at performance. –  Danny Chen Aug 20 '10 at 2:29
    
It would be faster to use a HashSet<string>. –  SLaks Nov 8 '10 at 13:45
    
@SLaks, perhaps, depending on the number of extensions... For only 3 extensions I don't think the difference is significant. –  Thomas Levesque Nov 8 '10 at 14:02

The following retrieves the jpg, tiff and bmp files and gives you an IEnumerable<FileInfo> over which you can iterate:

var files = dinfo.GetFiles("*.jpg")
    .Concat(dinfo.GetFiles("*.tiff"))
    .Concat(dinfo.GetFiles("*.bmp"));

If you really need an array, simply stick .ToArray() at the end of this.

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1  
That will be very inefficient if there are many files in the directory... –  Thomas Levesque Aug 20 '10 at 0:33

You can use LINQ Union method:

dir.GetFiles("*.txt").Union(dir.GetFiles("*.jpg")).ToArray();
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I'm not sure if that is possible. The MSDN GetFiles reference says a search pattern, not a list of search patterns.

I might be inclined to fetch each list separately and "foreach" them into a final list.

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I know there is a more elegant way to do this and I'm open to suggestions... this is what I did:

          try
            {


             // Set directory for list to be made of
                DirectoryInfo jpegInfo = new DirectoryInfo(destinationFolder);
                DirectoryInfo jpgInfo = new DirectoryInfo(destinationFolder);
                DirectoryInfo gifInfo = new DirectoryInfo(destinationFolder);
                DirectoryInfo tiffInfo = new DirectoryInfo(destinationFolder);
                DirectoryInfo bmpInfo = new DirectoryInfo(destinationFolder);

                // Set file type
                FileInfo[] Jpegs = jpegInfo.GetFiles("*.jpeg");
                FileInfo[] Jpgs = jpegInfo.GetFiles("*.jpg");
                FileInfo[] Gifs = gifInfo.GetFiles("*.gif");
                FileInfo[] Tiffs = gifInfo.GetFiles("*.tiff");
                FileInfo[] Bmps = gifInfo.GetFiles("*.bmp");

        //  listBox1.Items.Add(@"");  // Hack for the first list item no preview problem
        // Iterate through each file, displaying only the name inside the listbox...
        foreach (FileInfo file in Jpegs)
        {
                listBox1.Items.Add(file.Name);
                Photo curPhoto = new Photo();
                curPhoto.PhotoLocation = file.FullName;
                metaData.AddPhoto(curPhoto);
            }

          foreach (FileInfo file in Jpgs)
          {
              listBox1.Items.Add(file.Name);
                Photo curPhoto = new Photo();
                curPhoto.PhotoLocation = file.FullName;
                metaData.AddPhoto(curPhoto);
            }
          foreach (FileInfo file in Gifs)
          {
              listBox1.Items.Add(file.Name);
              Photo curPhoto = new Photo();
              curPhoto.PhotoLocation = file.FullName;
              metaData.AddPhoto(curPhoto);
          }
          foreach (FileInfo file in Tiffs)
          {
              listBox1.Items.Add(file.Name);
              Photo curPhoto = new Photo();
              curPhoto.PhotoLocation = file.FullName;
              metaData.AddPhoto(curPhoto);
          }
          foreach (FileInfo file in Bmps)
          {
              listBox1.Items.Add(file.Name);
              Photo curPhoto = new Photo();
              curPhoto.PhotoLocation = file.FullName;
              metaData.AddPhoto(curPhoto);
          }
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to create a separate instance of DirectoryInfo for each type... and there is a lot of repeated code, you should refactor that with a method. Anyway, I updated my answer to fix the error, did you try it ? –  Thomas Levesque Aug 20 '10 at 1:42

I am using following way to list files.

'////cblSourceFiles is CHECK BOX LIST CONTROL

<_asp:CheckBoxList ID="cblSourceFiles" runat="server" DataTextField="Name" DataValueField="Name" />

    cblSourceFiles.DataSource = (New IO.DirectoryInfo(Path)).EnumerateFiles().Where(AddressOf ValidExtensions)
    cblSourceFiles.DataBind()


Private Function ValidExtensions(ByVal pFi As System.IO.FileInfo, ByVal pSt As Integer) As Boolean
    Dim mRet As Boolean = False
    For Each mExt As String In ".jpg,.png".Split(",") '//// WebConfig.AllowedFiletypes 
        If pFi.Extension.ToLower = mExt.ToLower Then
            mRet = True
            Exit For
        End If
    Next
    Return mRet
End Function
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