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Recently I've started hearing about "POJOs" (Plain Old Java Objects). I googled it, but still don't understand the concept well. Can anyone give me a clear description of a POJO?

Consider a class "Person" with variables "id, name, address, salary" -- how would I create a POJO for this scenario? Is the code below a POJO?

 public class Person
 {
 //variables
 People people = new People();
private int id;
private String name;
private String address;
private int salary;


public int getId(){
 return id;
}
public String getName(){
 return name;
}
public String getAddress(){
 return address;
}
public int getSalary(){
 return salary;
}
public void setId(){
 this.id = id;
}
public void setName(){
 this.name = name;
}
public void setAddress(){
 this.address = address;
}
public void setSalary(){
 this.salary = salary;
}
}
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check out my answer to a similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3392580/…. This is referring to POCO's (.NET version of POJOS), but the fundamentals are the same. –  RPM1984 Aug 20 '10 at 0:22
    
@Tamil can you explain once again to me. about pojo –  Poovizhirajan.N Jul 22 '14 at 7:19
    
@Poovizhirajan.N, sorry for the long delay. somehow missed it. –  Tamil Vendhan Kanagaraju Mar 24 at 6:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

A POJO is just a plain, old Java Bean with the restrictions removed. Java Beans must meet the following requirements:

  1. Default no-arg constructor
  2. Follow the Bean convention of getFoo (or isFoo for booleans) and setFoo methods for a mutable attribute named foo; leave off the setFoo if foo is immutable.
  3. Must implement java.io.Serializable

POJO does not mandate any of these. It's just what the name says: an object that compiles under JDK can be considered a Plain Old Java Object. No app server, no base classes, no interfaces required to use.

The acronym POJO was a reaction against EJB 2.0, which required several interfaces, extended base classes, and lots of methods just to do simple things. Some people, Rod Johnson and Martin Fowler among them, rebelled against the complexity and sought a way to implement enterprise scale solutions without having to write EJBs.

Martin Fowler coined a new acronym.

Rod Johnson wrote "J2EE Without EJBs", wrote Spring, influenced EJB enough so version 3.1 looks a great deal like Spring and Hibernate, and got a sweet IPO from VMWare out of it.

Here's an example that you can wrap your head around:

public class MyFirstPojo
{
    private String name;

    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
       for (String arg : args)
       {
          MyFirstPojo pojo = new MyFirstPojo(arg);  // Here's how you create a POJO
          System.out.println(pojo); 
       }
    }

    public MyFirstPojo(String name)
    {    
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() { return this.name; } 

    public String toString() { return this.name; } 
}
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I ll never going to have this doubt again. Thanks. –  Tamil Vendhan Kanagaraju Aug 20 '10 at 0:42
2  
Some people can understand practical demo's faster, than reading. I am one of them. –  Tamil Vendhan Kanagaraju Aug 20 '10 at 0:50
    
I understand. I can be that way, too. I'll edit my answer. –  duffymo Aug 20 '10 at 1:05
    
Your particular example is immutable, but others are mutable. Did you just happen to make yours immutable? Is there any distinction between POJOs that contain unshared references to mutable objects for the purpose of encapsulating their state, and those which contain references identifying mutable objects to which other references also exist, for the purpose of encapsulating their identity? –  supercat Dec 6 '13 at 18:19
    
Just happened to come out that way. I was not intending to be exhaustive. It's a simple example, nothing more. –  duffymo Dec 6 '13 at 18:38

POJO:- POJO is a Java object not bound by any restriction other than those forced by the Java Language Specification.

Properties of POJO

  1. All properties must public setter and getter methods
  2. All instance variables should be private
  3. Should not Extend prespecified classes.
  4. Should not Implement prespecified interfaces.
  5. Should not contain prespecified annotations.
  6. It may not have no argument constructor

Example of POJO

public class POJO {

    private String value;

    public String getValue() {
         return value;
    }

    public void setValue(String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }
}
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A POJO is a Plain Old Java Object.

From the wikipedia article I linked to:

In computing software, POJO is an acronym for Plain Old Java Object. The name is used to emphasize that a given object is an ordinary Java Object, not a special object, and in particular not an Enterprise JavaBean

Your class appears to already be a POJO.

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1  
Hey, i also came across thro wiki. But i need a practical explanation man... –  Tamil Vendhan Kanagaraju Aug 20 '10 at 0:16

Pojo class is act as a bean which is used to set and get the value.

public class Data
{
private int id;
private String deptname;
private String date;
private String name;
private String mdate;
private String mname;

public int getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(int id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getDeptname() {
    return deptname;
}

public void setDeptname(String deptname) {
    this.deptname = deptname;
}

public String getDate() {
    return date;
}

public void setDate(String date) {
    this.date = date;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public String getMdate() {
    return mdate;
}

public void setMdate(String mdate) {
    this.mdate = mdate;
}

public String getMname() {
    return mname;
}

public void setMname(String mname) {
    this.mname = mname;
}

}
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When you aren't doing anything to make your class particularly designed to work with a given framework, ORM, or other system that needs a special sort of class, you have a Plain Old Java Object, or POJO.

Ironically, one of the reasons for coining the term is that people were avoiding them in cases where they were sensible and some people concluded that this was because they didn't have a fancy name. Ironic, because your question demonstrates that the approach worked.

Compare the older POD "Plain Old Data" to mean a C++ class that doesn't do anything a C struct couldn't do (more or less, non-virtual members that aren't destructors or trivial constructors don't stop it being considered POD), and the newer (and more directly comparable) POCO "Plain Old CLR Object" in .NET.

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Thankx for your reply senior. But i want some practical explanation. –  Tamil Vendhan Kanagaraju Aug 20 '10 at 0:15
    
You want a practical explanation of nomenclature for "not special"? Really? –  Jon Hanna Aug 20 '10 at 1:16

there are mainly three options are possible for mapping purpose

  1. serialize
  2. XML mapping
  3. POJO mapping.(Plain Old Java Objects)

While using the pojo classes,it is easy for a developer to map with the database. POJO classes are created for database and at the same time value-objects classes are created with getter and setter methods that will easily hold the content.

So,for the purpose of mapping in between java with database, value-objects and POJO classes are implemented.

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