Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to produce some example graphics using ggplot2, and one of the examples I picked was the birthday problem, here using code 'borrowed' from a Revolution computing presentation at Oscon.

birthday<-function(n){
    ntests<-1000
    pop<-1:365
    anydup<-function(i){
        any(duplicated(sample(pop,n,replace=TRUE)))
        }
    sum(sapply(seq(ntests), anydup))/ntests
    }

x<-data.frame(x=rep(1:100, each=5)) 
x<-ddply(x, .(x), function(df) {return(data.frame(x=df$x, prob=birthday(df$x)))})
birthdayplot<-ggplot(x, aes(x, prob))+
        geom_point()+geom_smooth()+
        theme_bw()+
        opts(title = "Probability that at least two people share a birthday in a random group")+
        labs(x="Size of Group", y="Probability")

Here my graph is what I would describe as exponential, but the geom_smooth doesn't fit the data particularly well. I've tried the loess method but this didn't change things much. Can anyone suggest how to add a better smooth ?

Thanks

Paul.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that the probabilities follow a logistic curve. You could fit a proper smoothing line if you change the birthday function to return the raw successes and failures instead of the probabilities.

birthday<-function(n){
  ntests<-1000
  pop<-1:365
  anydup<-function(i){
    any(duplicated(sample(pop,n,replace=TRUE)))
  }
  data.frame(Dups = sapply(seq(ntests), anydup) * 1, n = n)
}
x<-ddply(x, .(x),function(df) birthday(df$x))

Now, you'll have to add the points as a summary, and specify a logistic regression as the smoothing type.

ggplot(x, aes(n, Dups)) +
  stat_summary(fun.y = mean, geom = "point") +
  stat_smooth(method = "glm", family = binomial)
share|improve this answer
    
The curve is not really logistic, even if though it is S-shaped. You can see it using scale_y_logit() on the original plot –  Aniko Aug 20 '10 at 13:48
    
hm, right. I'm not sure what the appropriate regression is then, but having the raw numbers will still let you fit that line with stat_smooth(). –  JoFrhwld Aug 20 '10 at 14:46

The smoothing routine does not react to the sudden change for low values of x fast enough (and it has no way of knowing that the values of prob are restricted to a 0-1 range). Since you have so low variability, a quick solution is to reduce the span of values over which smoothing at each point is done. Check out the red line in this plot:

birthdayplot + geom_smooth(span=0.1, colour="red")
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.