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I noticed a few strange behaviors in a Windows Forms scenario which involves threads and UI, so, naturally, this means making use of the InvokeRequired property. The situation: my application makes use of a thread to do some work and the thread sends an event into the UI. The UI displays a message based on an Internationalization system which consists of a dictionary with keys. The I18N system cannot find a key in the dictionary and crashes.

Notes: application is in Debug Mode and I have a try-catch over the entire "Application.Run();" back in Program.cs. However, that try-catch is not reached, as what I will discuss here is based on inner Exception handling, but I mentioned it just in case.

So now here comes the fun parts:

  1. Why, for the life of me, does Visual Studio "censor" exception information from me? In the code below, you will see on the if (InvokeRequired) branch, a try-catch. I log the exception. ex.InnerException is NULL and the provided ex.StackTrace is anemic (only 1 step in it). Now if I comment the try-catch and simply let it crash via the Debugger, I get a much ampler stack trace. Why is that?

  2. To make things worse, neither of the two stack traces versions contain any information about the i18N crash. They just say "The given key was not present in the dictionary." and give me a stack trace up to the Invoke declaration.

  3. On the else branch (that is, InvokeRequired == false), if I put a try-catch, I can successfully catch my Exception back to the i18n system. As you can see, I tried to send my exception with InnerException back to the InvokeRequired == true branch. However, even so, InnerException stays NULL there and I cannot access my i18N error.

I am puzzled by all these things and maybe somebody can help shed some light over here. If you got really strong lanterns that is.

Here is the function's code.

private delegate void AddMessageToConsole_DELEGATE (frmMainPresenter.PresenterMessages message);
private void AddMessageToConsole (frmMainPresenter.PresenterMessages message)
{
  if (InvokeRequired)
  { //Catching any errors that occur inside the invoked function.
    try { Invoke(new AddMessageToConsole_DELEGATE(AddMessageToConsole), message); }
    catch (Exception ex) { MSASession.ErrorLogger.Log(ex); }
    //Invoke(new AddMessageToConsole_DELEGATE(AddMessageToConsole), message);
  }
  else
  {
    string message_text = ""; //Message that will be displayed in the Console / written in the Log.
    try
    {
      message_text = I18N.GetTranslatedText(message)
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
      throw new Exception(ex.Message, ex);
    }

    txtConsole.AppendText(message_text);
  }
}
share|improve this question
1  
#2 is a little confusing. The neither and not means that both exceptions give information about the i18N crash. I think you mean to say that neither of the exceptions give that information. You may want to reword that. Sorry if I am being a grammar Nazi :P –  Tony Abrams Aug 20 '10 at 10:34
    
True ::- D. I updated, sorry! –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 10:47
    
Is there any way I can bump my question up so that more people can see it? ::- >. –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 13:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The call stack problem is a known issue with Control.Invoke. You lose the call stack. Sorry. This is because it is rethrown on the UI thread using throw ex;.

The best solution would be to replace the background thread with a background Task. Note: this solution is only available for .NET 4.0. The Task class properly marshals exceptions. I wrote a blog entry about reporting progress from tasks, and the code in that blog entry will allow you to catch any UI update errors in the background thread, preserving the original exception and its call stack.

If you can't upgrade to .NET 4.0 yet, there is a workaround. Microsoft's Rx library includes a CoreEx.dll which has an extension method for Exception called PrepareForRethrow. This is supported in .NET 3.5 SP1 and .NET 4.0 (and SL 3 and SL 4). You'll need to wrap your UI updater method with something a little uglier:

private delegate void AddMessageToConsole_DELEGATE (frmMainPresenter.PresenterMessages message); 
private void AddMessageToConsole (frmMainPresenter.PresenterMessages message) 
{ 
  if (InvokeRequired) 
  {
    // Invoke the target method, capturing the exception.
    Exception ex = null;
    Invoke((MethodInvoker)() =>
    {
       try
       {
         AddMessageToConsole(message);
       }
       catch (Exception error)
       {
         ex = error;
       }
    });

    // Handle error if it was thrown
    if (ex != null)
    {
      MSASession.ErrorLogger.Log(ex);

      // Rethrow, preserving exception stack
      throw ex.PrepareForRethrow();
    }
  } 
  else 
  { 
    string message_text = ""; //Message that will be displayed in the Console / written in the Log. 
    try 
    { 
      message_text = I18N.GetTranslatedText(message) 
    } 
    catch (Exception ex) 
    { 
      throw new Exception(ex.Message, ex); 
    } 

    txtConsole.AppendText(message_text); 
  } 
} 

Note: I recommend you start a migration away from ISynchronizeInvoke. It is an outdated interface that is not carried forward into newer UI frameworks (e.g., WPF, Silverlight). The replacement is SynchronizationContext, which supports WinForms, WPF, Silverlight, ASP.NET, etc. SynchronizationContext is much more suitable as an abstract "thread context" for a business layer.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Stephen and thank you for your very detailed answer ::- D. Migrating to .Net 4.0 is possible for me in the future (more like 2011) so for now I'll simply be satisfied that I know why that behavior occurs. This was not such a big deal for me: it was only something that irked me. I already mitigated InvokeRequired's shortcoming by simply placing a logging-Try-catch in the ELSE branch, where I got the stack trace and everything. That puts a cork in the problem and I can happily skate of to other tasks ::- D. –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 13:57

Invoke on a Windows.Forms object causes the function to be invoked on a separate thread. If an Exception is thrown in your invoked function, the Exception is caught and a new TargetInvocationException is thrown.

This TargetInvocationException contains the initial Excpetion in it's InnerException property.

So, try to do it this way:

catch (TargetInvocationException ex) { MSASession.ErrorLogger.Log(ex.InnerException); }

Edit: Also, if you expand the InnerException property in the debugger, you will be able to access it's stacktrace, even if only as plain text.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't work. If I change the catch to that, the error is not caught any more and crashes within the "try" block. Looking in the .Net documentation I see that this method is used for Reflection scenarios. Maybe you were mislead by its name? ::- ). –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 10:57
    
Hmmm. Strange. Windows.Forms should invoke your method internally via System.Reflection. Could you place a breakpoint on the catch-line and check what type the Exception is and whether InnerException is null? EDIT: Please try changing the catch statement back to catch(Exception ex), but still accessing ex.InnerException in the Log()-Statement. –  Emiswelt Aug 20 '10 at 11:03
    
InnerException of the Exception is null, as I initially said. Type of Exception is "KeyNotFoundException". Accessing ex.InnerException does not work, it's null ::- ( –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 11:18
    
That is really strange. Have you already tried stepping through with the debugger and isolating the exact step were the exception is thrown? For this purpose, it would be useful to divide the Invoke statement into several two separate statements: Creating the delegate and invoking the delegate. Are you also sure that the i18N call causes the exception? Could you also try removing the secont try/catch (when InvokeRequired is false), and then checking whether an InnerException is present and checking the type of the exception? –  Emiswelt Aug 20 '10 at 11:39
    
Creation of the delegate does not crash. The I18N system crashes. Yes, I went step by step and I found the exact location of the error. But I want the errors to be correctly logged with a full stack trace, and they are not. Also, initially, there WAS no catch in the ELSE branch. I added it just because I was curious what the hell is going on there ::- D. Things stayed the same with or without the catch on the Else brance (when InvokeRequired is false). The same type of exception, no InnerException. –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 13:07

Yes, this is built-in behavior for Control.Invoke(). It only marshals the deepest nested InnerException back to the caller. Not so sure why they did this, beyond avoiding reporting exceptions that were raised by the marshaling code and would confuzzle the reader. It was done explicitly, you cannot change the way it works.

But keep your eyes on the ball, the real problem is that the string indeed cannot be found in the dictionary. The reason for that is that your background thread runs with a different culture from your UI thread. Different cultures have different string comparison rules. You either need to give your dictionary a different comparator (StringComparer.InvariantCulture) or you should switch your background thread to the same culture as your UI thread.

Dealing with a non-system default culture in your UI thread can be difficult, all other threads will be started with the system default. Especially threadpool threads are troublesome, you don't always control how they get started. And culture is not part of the Thread.ExecutionContext so doesn't get forwarded. This can cause subtle bugs, like the one you ran into. Other nastiness is, say, SortedList which suddenly becomes unsorted when read by a thread that uses a different culture. Using the system default culture is strongly recommended. Its what your user is likely to use anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Hans and thanks for answering ::- ). BTW, is there a way to somehow bump up for a little while a question if it was not answered? I mean, a legal way, not spamming the site, of course ::- ). Regarding your information: thank you for bringing me out of the dark. I didn't know this was "expected behavior". I also did not know about the Culture stuff, that's useful info, even though my bug doesn't have anything to do with that ::- D (my internationalization system is not based on any system setting, it's user-selected and it's custom made by myself via XML files). –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 13:54
1  
Edit your question to make it clearer. Attracts answerers and bumps it up. The mismatch between CurrentCulture values is far too great an explanation to not consider. And it really is determined by a system setting. Control Panel + Regional. –  Hans Passant Aug 20 '10 at 14:17
    
Oh, I never denied that it is controlled by a system setting. Of course it is. I just said that I don't care about that stuff in my application. Also, I did not dis-consider your explanation! ::- ). –  Axonn Aug 20 '10 at 15:50

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