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I want to list (a sorted list) all my entries from an attribute called streetNames in my table/relation Customers. eg. I want to achieve the following order:

Street_1A
Street_1B
Street_2A
Street_2B
Street_12A
Street_12B

A simple order by streetNames will do a lexical comparision and then Street_12A and B will come before Street_2A/B, and that is not correct. Is it possible to solve this by pure SQL?

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What DBMS? Some provide non-standard ways of changing the sort order –  Matt Rogish Dec 9 '08 at 15:12
    
Whatever the DBMS is, trying to solve this problem without spliting the data in multiple fields (as proposed in some of the answers) is a lost cause. –  Philippe Grondier Dec 9 '08 at 16:28

7 Answers 7

up vote -1 down vote accepted

The reliable way to do it (reliable in terms of "to sort your data correctly", not "to solve your general problem") is to split the data into street name and house number and sort both of them on their own. But this requires knowing where the house number starts. And this is the tricky part - making the assumption best fits your data.

You should use something like the following to refactor your data and from now on store the house number in a separate field. All this string-juggling won't perform too well when it comes to sorting large data sets.

Assuming it is the last thing in the street name, and it contains a number:

DECLARE @test TABLE
(
  street VARCHAR(100)
)

INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES('Street')
INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES('Street 1A')
INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES('Street1 12B')
INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES('Street 22A')
INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES('Street1 200B-8a')
INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES('')
INSERT INTO @test (street) VALUES(NULL)

SELECT
  street,
  CASE 
    WHEN LEN(street) > 0 AND CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) > 0
    THEN CASE
      WHEN RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1) LIKE '%[0-9]%'
      THEN LEFT(street, LEN(street) - CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)))
    END
  END street_part,
  CASE 
    WHEN LEN(street) > 0 AND CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) > 0
    THEN CASE 
      WHEN RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1) LIKE '%[0-9]%'
      THEN RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1)
    END
  END house_part,
  CASE 
    WHEN LEN(street) > 0 AND CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) > 0
    THEN CASE 
      WHEN RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1) LIKE '%[0-9]%'
      THEN CASE
        WHEN PATINDEX('%[a-z]%', LOWER(RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1))) > 0
        THEN CONVERT(INT, LEFT(RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1), PATINDEX('%[^0-9]%', LOWER(RIGHT(street, CHARINDEX(' ', REVERSE(street)) - 1))) - 1))
      END
    END
  END house_part_num
FROM
  @test 
ORDER BY
  street_part,
  house_part_num,
  house_part

This assumes these conditions:

  • a street address can have a house number
  • a house number must be the last thing in a street address (no "525 Monroe Av.")
  • a house number should start with a digit to be sorted correctly
  • a house number can be a range ("200-205"), this would be sorted below 200
  • a house number must not contain spaces or recognition fails (When you look at your data, you could apply something like REPLACE(street, ' - ', '-') to sanitize common patterns beforehand.)
  • the whole thing is still an approximation that certainly deviates from what it would look like in a telephone book, for example
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I think your assumed constraints regarding the number will not pass the first 10 rows! –  Philippe Grondier Dec 9 '08 at 15:34
    
Why do you think that? –  Tomalak Dec 9 '08 at 15:35
    
Because you'll have lines without numbers, lines with numbers, lines with numbers + text (A, B, C), lines where the number will be at the beginning of the field, etc... –  Philippe Grondier Dec 9 '08 at 15:37
    
lines with numbers like 292-296, etc. –  Philippe Grondier Dec 9 '08 at 15:38

Select street_name from tablex order by udf_getStreetNumber(street_name)

in your udf_getStreetNumber - write your business rule for stripping out the number

EDIT

I think you can use regex functionality in SQL Server now. I'd just strip out all non-number characters from the input.

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Which will run badly for anything more than a few hundred rows... better to split the fields, even if it a computed column using the same fucntion which canbe persisted and indexed –  gbn Dec 9 '08 at 15:13
    
The data is what it is... He didn't ask to redesign his schema. I've had to use udfs like this on millions of rows and it works fast and without issue. –  mson Dec 9 '08 at 15:18
    
@mson, Running udfs on millions of rows is a real performance issue, unless you are using an "inline" udf... It's because (except for inline udfs) the udf has to be recompiled for each execution, (a million times if you run it on a million row select...) –  Charles Bretana Dec 9 '08 at 16:10
    
@Charles - How would this business case be written other than as a scalar udf? –  mson Dec 9 '08 at 16:20

For the record: it is called Natural Sort Order, and there is a Coding horror article in the subject.

I guess you can do it in SQL using some of the code showed here, but it will by always in a case by case scenario.

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The only interest of the whole question was to get your answer with the link to the article. Thank you! –  Philippe Grondier Dec 9 '08 at 16:26

I'm sure you could by splitting up the streetName field into it's different pieces with something like substr(streetName, 1, find(" ",streetName)) just for the street and so on. But that's going to be pretty messy and it will have to deal with all kinds of special cases (no house number, house number without an addition) or international issues (in the US, adresses are typically like 1 Street).

But if you want to the sorting as you described and that is an important requirement, it would be better to model you streetName in three parts, i.e. street (e.g. "Street"), house_number (e.g. 1, 2, 12), house_num_addition (e.g. "A", "B"). Then the sort becomes trivial in SQL.

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What makes you think the number is a house number, and not, as he states in the problem, part of the street name? –  Paul Tomblin Dec 9 '08 at 15:21
    
Streets cannot be readily broken down into 3 components. You will find that the mix of international, rural route, military, and crazy street names break your rule. –  mson Dec 9 '08 at 15:23

If you have write-access to the database I would really recommend converting it all to use 3 separate fields and then using them appropriately. This way you could even do it in PHP (yes, it will take some time, but it will happen only once). This could be some pain if you have a large code-base, having to check for all of the queries with this table, but it will eventually pay-off later. For example, it will make the search by address much easier.

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Yes it's possible! But definitely of no interest! If you find somebody here ready to spend a few hours writing down and testing the SP that will split your streetNames into a streetName + streetNumber combination, give me his name: I will submit him a few problems where I thought I had to pay to get the work done.

By the way, can't you split your data into 2 fields, one 'streetName' with only the name of the street, and a new 'buildingNumber' field? (Avoid to name this one 'streetNumber', as, in some countries/cities, streets are given numbers).

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Having a bad day? :-) –  Tomalak Dec 9 '08 at 15:30
    
no not specifically! –  Philippe Grondier Dec 9 '08 at 15:32

If it is the case that all values in the streetNames column follow the pattern StreetName- space - StreetNumber

where StreetName can contain other spaces, but StreetNumber CANNOT, then this will work:

Declare @T Table (streetName VarChar(50))
Insert @T(streetName) Values('Street 1A')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('Street 2A')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('Street 2B')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('Street 12A')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('Another Street 1A')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('Another Street 4A')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('a third Street 12B')
Insert @T(streetName) Values('a third Street 1C')

Select * From @T 
Order By Substring(StreetName, 0, 1 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName))),
       Cast(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)),  
    	Case When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 5)) = 1  Then 5
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 4)) = 1  Then 4
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 3)) = 1  Then 3
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 2)) = 1  Then 2
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 1)) = 1  Then 1
    			End) as Integer),
        Substring(StreetName, len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)) +
    		Case When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 5)) = 1  Then 5
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 4)) = 1  Then 6
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 3)) = 1  Then 5
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 2)) = 1  Then 4
    		 When IsNumeric(Substring(StreetName, 2 + len(StreetName) - charIndex(' ', reverse(StreetName)), 1)) = 1  Then 3
    			End, Len(StreetName))
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