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Consider following function declaration:

int abmeld(char *strsend)

which is called like this

abmeld(str);

where str is a global variable declared and initialised at the start of the program file (after the includes) like this:

char str[300] = "";

Now I already know this is unnecessary code (you can access and modify the char array from within any function without passing it anyways), but is this actually otherwise problematic?

Are there consequences (like hard error possibilities, or undefined behavior) that can happen as the result of passing an already globally scoped variable to a function?

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18  
The function does not care where the parameter comes from. – Micha Wiedenmann Feb 10 at 7:54
2  
A pointer is a pointer. It doesn't matter what is the scope of the pointed variable. BTW I'd suggest to make the global static: static char str[300] = {0}; – LPs Feb 10 at 7:55
1  
What do you mean with "problematic"? If you mean unnecessary or possibly bad design then the answer is yes. If you mean that it won't work, then no, it will indeed work. – DarioP Feb 10 at 7:57
1  
Definitely not UB. – DarioP Feb 10 at 8:00
3  
Side issue: calling abmeld(char *strsend) with char str[300] is in itself a potential issue as abmeld(), which can change str[], does not know the size of the array. I would expect abmeld(const char *strsend) or abmeld(char *strsend, size_t size). – chux Feb 10 at 15:18
up vote 28 down vote accepted

I would say the opposite, it is almost never problematic to pass a global to a function (and it is usually dirty to use a lot of globals, the code becoming unreadable).

A function which depends lightly (or not at all) on the global state is often more readable and more understandable than a function using a lot of global (or even static) variables. A global variable changed in many functions makes your program messy to understand.

(never forget that you code not only for the computer, but also for your colleagues -perhaps even yourself in a few months- who would have to improve your source code)

Also, functions using global state are typically not reentrant.

At last, undefined behavior is mostly orthogonal to global vs argument data. In particular, a buffer overflow can occur both with a global variable, or with a pointer to some array (such as an argument or some local variable) .

A very crude rule of thumb would be to avoid loading the developer's brain with more than 7 items (magical number 7, + or - 2); hence the folklore rule to avoid more than 7 arguments or more than 7 globals.

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3  
Global constants are much less harmful in this respect - they don't affect reentrancy, for instance. – MSalters Feb 10 at 12:29

There is a case where this could be problematic: if abmeld already does something with the str global. As a trivial example:

extern char str[300];

void abmeld(const char *s)
{
    snprintf(str, 300, "abmeld: %s\n", s);
}

then abmeld(str) has undefined behavior, because snprintf has undefined behavior when its destination buffer overlaps any of its inputs.

This demonstrates one of the reasons global variables are troublesome: in order to know what's safe to pass as an argument to abmeld, you have to know not only that it writes to str (which would surely be documented), but how it does that — it could have been written

void abmeld(const char *s)
{
    size_t n = strlen(s);
    size_t maxcopy = min(n, 300 - sizeof "abmeld: \n");
    size_t after = maxcopy + sizeof "abmeld: " - 1;

    memmove(str + sizeof "abmeld: " - 1, s, maxcopy);
    memcpy(str, "abmeld: ", sizeof "abmeld: " - 1);
    str[after] = '\n';
    str[after+1] = 0;
}

and then it would have well-defined behavior no matter what s points to, as long as it's a valid C-string.

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Yes, at last! This is a very important potential problem. – Jonathan Leffler Feb 10 at 14:34

Now I already know this is unnecessary code (you can access and modify the char array from within any function without passing it anyways), but is this actually otherwise problematic?

It doesn't matter to the function whether it receives locally or globally defined variable. Issues with global variables are related sometimes to the fact that you might not know from which parts of the program you are accessing/changing its value. Thread safety maybe also relevant.

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The program in question has no threading and only one program file, but thanks for pointing that out anyways. – Magisch Feb 10 at 7:56

It's very, VERY common to pass globals to functions. Example:

const char* global = "Example";

void foo() {
  printf("%s\n",  global );
}

Obviously this passes a global to printf. The C language by design makes this usage safe. A buggy implementation that trips over this would quickly be called out.

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This question is not in any way about c++ though. – Magisch Feb 10 at 10:53
    
@Magisch: Overlooked that bit, but the principle still applies to C as well. Edited. – MSalters Feb 10 at 10:56
    
The difference to the question is: 1. the global is const 2. the global is not passed as argument to the function. – StefanW Feb 10 at 22:15
    
@StefanW: In case you missed it, it's being passed to printf. I had to add foo because you can't have that printf statement outside a function. That said, this code also would work with char global[] = – MSalters Feb 11 at 0:22

No, not at all.

Now I already know this is unnecessary code

Not always. In the case when your function does not have a default argument, then you have to comply with the function prototype and pass the global variable. The function won't care, whether the pointer points to local or global variable, though.

/* main.c */
char str[300] = {0};
int abmeld(char *strsend)
{
  /* Do something...process strsend */
  return 0;
}

int main( void )
{
  abmeld(str); /*Cannot pass void here as abmeld expects a char* */

  char localstr[10] = {0};
  abmeld(localstr);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you complete the code to demonstrate when we have to "comply with the function syntax" better? – sun qingyao Feb 10 at 8:40
    
@sunqingyao Here you go... – Abhineet Feb 10 at 12:28
    
It's better now, +1. – sun qingyao Feb 10 at 13:22

You want to pass global variable to the function. It's simple that function you are using, requires parameter then you have to pass the parameters of the type of the argument that is required in the function.

Here, there is no concern or issue for passing a global variable or a local variable. You have to take care of the datatype of the argument that is to be passed.

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  1. The method abmeld(char *) is only supposed to modify/work with the argument provided to it. While it may be bad to pass a global variable to this method, yet that doesn't prohibit anyone from calling this method with any other char *.

    • For example, if this method checks whether the string pointed to is palindrome, then writing this method exemplifies good coding. Now anyone can call it every time he/she wants to know whether the string is palindrome or not.
  2. Now I already know this is unnecessary code (you can access and modify the char array from within any function without passing it anyways), but is this actually otherwise problematic?

    • It may not be unnecessary code as explained above. The purpose of writing a new method is to compartmentalize one piece of work. In other words, a method should do only one thing. Unless the method abmeld(char *) has been written to exclusively modify that particular global variable (and even that may be a good thing), the code is perfectly ok the way it has been written as long as it is doing one thing with the argument provided to it.

    • There are numerous examples where this code may be problematic and the problems are intuitive. For example, there may be more methods which may be modifying/working on the global string. But, those problems are the problems which arise whenever you use a global variable. To get rid of those issues, you have to get rid of the global var and not the method because it isn't the method's fault that it is being used with a global var.

  3. Are there consequences (like hard error possibilities, or undefined behavior) that can happen as the result of passing an already globally scoped variable to a function?

    • Cannot say this authoritatively but I don't know of any. Didn't read any book either which advised against passing global vars to functions.
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