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I've been playing around with XNA a lot lately and I've also been reading quite a bit about garbage collection in games. I think I've done a reasonable job of reducing the amount of garbage by using pooling and avoiding a dependence on foreach.

Right now I have my base game entities stored in a KeyedCollection that allows me to iterate over all entities (like a List) and reference an entity by key (like a Dictionary).

I would like to be able to query my collection and return another collection without producing garbage each query. I've included a sample of the concept below because I think I'm better at coding them I am at explaining...

/// <summary>
/// Defines a sample entity.
/// </summary>
public class SampleEntity
{
    public uint Id;
    public Vector2 Position;
}

/// <summary>
/// Defines a collection of sample entities.
/// </summary>
public class EntityCollection : KeyedCollection<uint, SampleEntity>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Return the key for the supplied item.
    /// </summary>
    protected override uint GetKeyForItem(SampleEntity item)
    {
        return item.Id;
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Defines the sample game class.
/// </summary>
public class GameSample
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Create a new instance of the GameSample class.
    /// </summary>
    public GameSample()
    {
        Entities = new EntityCollection();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Get the collection of game entities.
    /// </summary>
    public EntityCollection Entities { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Return the collection of entities within a radius of the supplied point.
    /// </summary>
    public List<SampleEntity> Query(Vector2 center, float radius)
    {
        List<SampleEntity> results = new List<SampleEntity>() // BAD, BAD, BAD!!!!!

        //
        // add the entities to the results collection
        //

        return results;
    }
}

This (overly simplified) example would produce a heck of a lot of garbage because it creates a new List object every call. I've also played with creating a global results list and clearing every call but that seems ugly.

    /// <summary>
    /// Return the collection of entities within a radius of the specified point.
    /// </summary>
    public List<SampleEntity> Query(Vector2 center, float radius)
    {
        _globalResults.Clear();

        //
        // add the entities to the global results collection
        //

        return _globalResults;
    }

Am I just missing something? Is there a more elegant solution out there I'm just not aware of.

share|improve this question
    
"I think I've done a reasonable job of reducing the amount of garbage" - In case you are not already: You should use the CLR Profiler, then you would know for sure. –  Andrew Russell Aug 20 '10 at 13:32
    
Hard to tell without knowing the logic inside of "add the entities to the results collection", but I would say it is most likely that yield return is your friend. –  Nate Pinchot Aug 20 '10 at 13:35
    
@Andrew: The game isn't quite far enough along to get much useful information from a profiler yet, but thank you for directing me towards the CLR Profiler. @Nate: Unfortunatly the yield keyword produces garbage as well in a similar fashion to my example. It creates a new IEnumerable<T> object with each function call. –  Pixelfish Aug 20 '10 at 13:48
1  
If the game isn't far enough along to get useful information from a profiler than you are performing "premature optimization" which, as we all know, is the root of all evil: "Premature optimization" is a phrase used to describe a situation where a programmer lets performance considerations affect the design of a piece of code. This can result in a design that is not as clean as it could have been or code that is incorrect, because the code is complicated by the optimization and the programmer is distracted by optimizing. –  Tergiver Aug 20 '10 at 13:56
    
@Tergiver: I agree. I'm trying to be careful about not letting my programmer OCD take control. This might be an instance of that too where the clear and elegant solution might be to produce garbage and the optimized solution might be more convoluted then necessary. I do know, however, that making informed decisions now will save time later. I guess that's what I'm really after. –  Pixelfish Aug 20 '10 at 14:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the best solution in a case like this is to make your function look something like this:

 public void Query(Vector2 center, float radius, List<SampleEntity> result)
 {
     result.Clear();
     result.Add(/*...*/);
     // ...
 }

And make the caller responsible for managing that list.

Also: When making games, don't be afraid to write simple code. If a global list of results works - then that is a fine solution.


If you don't need to store the list, then Skurmedel's answer is probably better from a performance standpoint.

Although, if it were me, I would do the really simple thing and just directly iterate over Entities. Same effect, maybe a tiny bit faster, and most importantly: less code.

Write your complicated enumerating Query function after you write your complicated spatial partitioning data structure, which you would only write after you actually need the performance it offers.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I'm going to take what you, Skurmedel, and Tergiver said to heart. I'll worry about optimization when I need to and just use the yield return for now since I don't specifically need to store the results in a List<T>. I do find your original solution interesting though and I am interested in exploring what you mean by directly iterate over my entities. –  Pixelfish Aug 20 '10 at 15:38

I think Andrew Russell has the right idea, but if you could do away with the List entirely that would be even better. You would make an IEnumerable (with yield return or handwrite an instance) that returns the items found by the query. You would not need a new list. You could basically achieve this with LINQ as well.

I visualize this as having a "window" or "view" into the contents of the collection.

The only thing you would need for look out is invalidating the IEnumerable, you can't modify the list while something else is iterating over it.

If you are afraid of creating a new IEnumerable each time, reuse it. You could reuse the enumerator as well but this would limit the amount of callers doing a query to one at a time. If two callers start using the same enumerator at the same time the gates of hell will open up.

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I don't think that what your asking for is possible - if you want a different collection (i.e. one where the elements in that collection are somehow different from another collection) then you need a new instance of some collection in order to be able to store what those differences are.

The best you could probably hope for would be to use an array instead of a list as the memory overhead is probably lower, however (I'm not a game developer) this all strikes me as over optimisation - the overhead of collection instances is relatively small.

Don't get me wrong - its good that you are aware of things like this, I just think that you shouldn't obsess over this level of detail, as your unlikely to see any impact.

share|improve this answer
    
As a fellow desktop developer I agree. The garbage collector on the XBox, however, is called after every allocating of 1MB and is notoriously slow. If I produce garbage by being careless then I could start dropping frame simply from the GC running too often. –  Pixelfish Aug 20 '10 at 13:54

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