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This is probably not possible, but I have this class:

public class Metadata<DataType> where DataType : struct
{
    private DataType mDataType;
}

There's more to it, but let's keep it simple. The generic type (DataType) is limited to value types by the where statement. What I want to do is have a list of these Metadata objects of varying types (DataType). Such as:

List<Metadata> metadataObjects;
metadataObjects.Add(new Metadata<int>());
metadataObjects.Add(new Metadata<bool>());
metadataObjects.Add(new Metadata<double>());

Is this even possible?

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9  
I wonder if there's any real benefit to the approaches in the below answers compared to just using a List<object>? They won't stop boxing/unboxing, they won't remove the need for casting, and ultimately, you are getting a Metadata object that does not tell you anything about the actual DataType, I was searching for a solution to address those issues. If you're going to declare an interface/class, just for the sake of being able to put the implementing/derived generic type in a generic list, just how different is that than using a List<object> other than having a meaningless layer? –  Saeb Nov 17 '12 at 18:11
2  
Both the abstract base class and interface provide a degree of control by restricting the type of elements that can be added to the list. I also can't see how boxing comes into this. –  0b101010 Feb 27 at 20:06
    
Of course, if you are using .NET v4.0 or higher then covariance is the solution. List<Metadata<object>> does the trick. –  0b101010 Feb 27 at 20:50
    
@0b101010 I was thinking the same, but unfortunately variance is not allowed on value types. Since OP has a struct constraint, it doesn't work here. See –  nawfal Jul 7 at 7:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 71 down vote accepted
public abstract class Metadata
{
}

public class Metadata<DataType> : MetaData where DataType : struct
{
    private DataType mDataType;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Wow! I really didn't think that was possible! You're a life saver, man! –  Carl Dec 9 '08 at 15:37
1  
+10 for this! I don't know why this compiles.. Exactly what I needed! –  Odys Dec 20 '11 at 22:45
    
I have a similar problem, but my generic class extends from another generic class, so I can't use your solution... any ideas on a fix for this situation? –  Sheridan Aug 8 '12 at 12:44
    
@Sheridan: The interface approach below will work then. –  leppie Aug 8 '12 at 15:51
2  
Is there a benefit to this approach compared to a simple List<object>? please look at my comment posted under OP's question. –  Saeb Nov 17 '12 at 18:10

Following leppie's answer, why not make MetaData an interface:

public interface IMetaData { }

public class Metadata<DataType> : IMetaData where DataType : struct
{
    private DataType mDataType;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can someone tell me why this approach is better? –  Lazlo Sep 1 '10 at 17:46
13  
Because no common functionality is shared - why waste a base class on that then? An interface is sufficient –  flq Sep 3 '10 at 21:04
1  
Because you can implement interfaces in struct. –  Vash - Damian Leszczyński Jan 1 '12 at 20:42
    
Class inheritance using virtual methods, however, is roughly 1.4x faster than interface methods. So if you plan on implementing any non-generic MetaData (virtual) methods/properties in MetaData<DataType>, choose an abstract class rather than an interface, if performance is a concern. Otherwise, using an interface can be more flexible. –  TamusJRoyce Apr 4 '12 at 20:08
1  
Is there a benefit to this approach compared to a simple List<object>? please look at my comment posted under OP's question. –  Saeb Nov 17 '12 at 18:12

I have also used a non-generic version, using the new keyword:

public interface IMetadata
{
    Type DataType { get; }

    object Data { get; }
}

public interface IMetadata<TData> : IMetadata
{
    new TData Data { get; }
}

Explicit interface implementation is used to allow both Data members:

public class Metadata<TData> : IMetadata<TData>
{
    public Metadata(TData data)
    {
       Data = data;
    }

    public Type DataType
    {
        get { return typeof(TData); }
    }

    object IMetadata.Data
    {
        get { return Data; }
    }

    public TData Data { get; private set; }
}

You could derive a version targeting value types:

public interface IValueTypeMetadata : IMetadata
{

}

public interface IValueTypeMetadata<TData> : IMetadata<TData>, IValueTypeMetadata where TData : struct
{

}

public class ValueTypeMetadata<TData> : Metadata<TData>, IValueTypeMetadata<TData> where TData : struct
{
    public ValueTypeMetadata(TData data) : base(data)
    {}
}

This can be extended to any kind of generic constraints.

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1  
+1 just because you are showing how to use it (DataType and object Data helped a lot) –  Odys Dec 26 '11 at 19:04
1  
I don't seem to be able to write for example Deserialize<metadata.DataType>(metadata.Data);. It tells me cannot resolve symbol metadata. How to retrieve the DataType to use it for a generic method? –  Cœur May 26 at 9:01

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