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I have a datagrid bound to an observable collection of objects. What I want to do is have a button that will execute a method of the object representing the row of the button that was clicked. So what I have now is something like this:

            <DataGridTemplateColumn Header="Command">
                <DataGridTemplateColumn.CellTemplate>
                    <DataTemplate>
                        <Button Name="cmdCommand" Click="{Binding Command}" 
                                Content="Command"/>
                    </DataTemplate>
                </DataGridTemplateColumn.CellTemplate>
            </DataGridTemplateColumn>

Which doesn't work and reports the following error:

Click="{Binding Command}" is not valid. '{Binding Command}' is not a valid event handler method name. Only instance methods on the generated or code-behind class are valid.

I've looked at command binding but that looks like it would just end up going to a single external command instead of to the object bound to the row. I have it working using an event handler on the code behind and then routing it to the item bound to the selected row (since the row gets selected when the button is clicked) but that seems like poor way of handing this and I assume I'm just missing something here.

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What is "Command" in the code behind? And what is the command suppose to achieve? Selecting a Row? –  jsmith Aug 20 '10 at 14:26
    
In this case "Command" isn't in the code behind. I tried to get this down to the minimum needed to explain so in this case it's just a method of the class that I'm binding to the datagrid (so it would be myObject.Command();). –  Mark Aug 20 '10 at 15:44
    
As for what it should achieve, right now just for testing it just updates another property in the object which fires a propertychanged event. –  Mark Aug 20 '10 at 15:45
    
I created a library that will allow you to use the following syntax {BindTo SaveObject}. You can find it here: simplygoodcode.com/2012/08/simpler-wpf-binding.html –  luisperezphd Aug 6 '12 at 17:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 32 down vote accepted

I do this all the time. Here's a look at an example and how you would implement it.

Change your XAML to use the Command property of the button instead of the Click event. I am using the name SaveCommand since it is easier to follow then something named Command.

<Button Command="{Binding Path=SaveCommand}" />

Your CustomClass that the Button is bound to now needs to have a property called SaveCommand of type ICommand. It needs to point to the method on the CustomClass that you want to run when the command is executed.

public MyCustomClass
{
    private ICommand _saveCommand;

    public ICommand SaveCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_saveCommand == null)
            {
                _saveCommand = new RelayCommand(
                    param => this.SaveObject(), 
                    param => this.CanSave()
                );
            }
            return _saveCommand;
        }
    }

    private bool CanSave()
    {
        // Verify command can be executed here
    }

    private void SaveObject()
    {
        // Save command execution logic
    }
}

The above code uses a RelayCommand which accepts two parameters: the method to execute, and a true/false value of if the command can execute or not. The RelayCommand class is a separate .cs file with the code shown below. I got it from Josh Smith :)

/// <summary>
/// A command whose sole purpose is to 
/// relay its functionality to other
/// objects by invoking delegates. The
/// default return value for the CanExecute
/// method is 'true'.
/// </summary>
public class RelayCommand : ICommand
{
    #region Fields

    readonly Action<object> _execute;
    readonly Predicate<object> _canExecute;        

    #endregion // Fields

    #region Constructors

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a new command that can always execute.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="execute">The execution logic.</param>
    public RelayCommand(Action<object> execute)
        : this(execute, null)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a new command.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="execute">The execution logic.</param>
    /// <param name="canExecute">The execution status logic.</param>
    public RelayCommand(Action<object> execute, Predicate<object> canExecute)
    {
        if (execute == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("execute");

        _execute = execute;
        _canExecute = canExecute;           
    }

    #endregion // Constructors

    #region ICommand Members

    [DebuggerStepThrough]
    public bool CanExecute(object parameters)
    {
        return _canExecute == null ? true : _canExecute(parameters);
    }

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
    {
        add { CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value; }
        remove { CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value; }
    }

    public void Execute(object parameters)
    {
        _execute(parameters);
    }

    #endregion // ICommand Members
}
share|improve this answer
6  
That's considerably more complicated than I would have thought. How would I wire up that to the command in the object? Does that class need to be exposed by the bound object?> –  Mark Aug 20 '10 at 15:07
1  
+1 However, maybe this needs some more explanation on how to use. –  Chris Valentine Aug 20 '10 at 15:31
1  
HCL: Agreed, how does one wire this into the view? How exactly does this get used in the object I'm binding? It seems like maybe this is the way to go but I'm at a loss as to how I would implement this for my current needs. Thanks! –  Mark Aug 20 '10 at 15:42
1  
Sorry for that, I updated the post to hopefully be a little more clear on what bits of code go where. Let me know if you have questions about it. –  Rachel Aug 20 '10 at 16:06
3  
@Sinaesthetic That's an event definition. You have add and remove for events much like you have get and set for properties. It simply tells it what to do when you add or remove a method to the event. –  Rachel Nov 2 '13 at 17:52

You have various possibilies. The most simple and the most ugly is:

XAML

<Button Name="cmdCommand" Click="Button_Clicked" Content="Command"/> 

Code Behind

private void Button_Clicked(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { 
    FrameworkElement fe=sender as FrameworkElement;
    ((YourClass)fe.DataContext).DoYourCommand();     
} 

Another solution (better) is to provide a ICommand-property on your YourClass. This command will have already a reference to your YourClass-object and therefore can execute an action on this class.

XAML

<Button Name="cmdCommand" Command="{Binding YourICommandReturningProperty}" Content="Command"/>

Because during writing this answer, a lot of other answers were posted, I stop writing more. If you are interested in one of the ways I showed or if you think I have made a mistake, make a comment.

share|improve this answer
    
For the Icommand idea would you implement it similarly to Rachel's idea below? –  Mark Aug 20 '10 at 15:01
1  
Rachel shows you an infrastructure to solve such questions generalized. There are other ways to do it but I would find it worth the time to try understand and implement it the way she showed you. –  Chris Valentine Aug 20 '10 at 15:29
1  
Isn't it "Command", not "Click", if you use an ICommand-based property? –  EboMike Oct 24 at 1:17
1  
@EboMike: Thanks, changed it! –  Chris Valentine Oct 24 at 6:57

Click is an event. In your code behind, you need to have a corresponding event handler to whatever you have in the XAML. In this case, you would need to have the following:

private void Command(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{

}

Commands are different. If you need to wire up a command, you'd use the Commmand property of the button and you would either use some pre-built Commands or wire up your own via the CommandManager class (I think).

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3  
Thanks yeah, that's what I meant by the last bit of my post, I got it working via a normal event handler on the code behind but I wanted a better solution. –  Mark Aug 20 '10 at 15:22

Some more explanations to the solution Rachel already gave:

"WPF Apps With The Model-View-ViewModel Design Pattern"

by Josh Smith

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx

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