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I have been using PRETTY_FUNCTION to output the current function name, however I have reimplemented some functions and would like to find out which functions are calling them.

In C++ how can I get the function name of the calling routine?

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This is not a part of the C++ language. Your compiler may have some utilities to allow something like this, so please specify your environment. –  Marcin Dec 9 '08 at 15:49
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here are two options:

  1. You can get a full stacktrace (including the name, module, and offset of the calling function) with recent versions of glibc with the GNU backtrace functions. See my answer here for the details. This is probably the easiest thing.

  2. If that isn't exactly what you're looking for, then you might try libunwind, but it's going to involve more work.

Keep in mind that this isn't something you can know statically (as with PRETTY_FUNCTION); you actually have to walk the stack to figure out what function called you. So this isn't something that's really worth doing in ordinary debug printfs. If you want to do more serious debugging or analysis, though, then this might be useful for you.

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Your "answer here" was deleted. –  Tom Brito Jan 15 '13 at 11:55
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You probably want the names of all functions that potentially could call them. This is basically a set of edges in the call graph. Doxygen can generate the call graph, and then it's simply a matter of looking at the incoming edges of your functions node.

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This doesn't tell you who actually called you. It only tells you who could've called you. –  tgamblin Dec 9 '08 at 15:58
    
And what about libraries. It does not tell you what application functions may call you. –  Loki Astari Dec 9 '08 at 17:46
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In the firs approximation, just grep the codebase for the function names. Then comes Doxygen, and then dynamic logging (both discussed by others).

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Here is a solution you can often use. It has the advantage of requiring no changes to the actual function code (no adding calls to stackwalk functions, changing parameters to pass in function names, or linking to extra libraries.). To get it working, you simply need to use a bit of preprocessor magic:

Simple Example

// orignal function name was 'FunctionName'
void FunctionNameReal(...)
{
  // Do Something
}

#undef FunctionName
#define FunctionName printf("Calling FunctionName from %s\n",__FUNCTION__);FunctionNameReal

You must rename your function temporarily, but see the note below for more suggestions. This will result in a printf() statement at each point of calling the function. Obviously, you have to make some arrangements if you are calling a member function, or need to capture the return value (Like pass the function call and __FUNCTION__ to a custom function that returns the same type...), but the basic technique is the same. You might want to use __LINE__ and __FILE__ or some other preprocessor macros depending on which compiler you have. (This example is specifically for MS VC++, but probably works in others.)

Also, you might want to put something like this in your header surrounded by #ifdef guards to conditionally turn it on, which can handle renaming the actual function for you as well.

UPDATE [2012-06-21]

I got a request to expand my answer. As it turns out, my above example is a bit simplistic. Here are some fully compiling examples of handling this, using C++.

Full Source Example with a return value

Using a class with operator() makes this pretty straight forward. This first technique works for freestanding functions with and without return values. operator() just needs to reflect the same return as the function in question, and have matching arguments.

You can compile this with g++ -o test test.cpp for a non-reporting version and g++ -o test test.cpp -DREPORT for a version that displays the caller information.

#include <iostream>

int FunctionName(int one, int two)
{
  static int calls=0;
  return (++calls+one)*two;
}

#ifdef REPORT
  // class to capture the caller and print it.  
  class Reporter
  {
    public:
      Reporter(std::string Caller, std::string File, int Line)
        : caller_(Caller)
        , file_(File)
        , line_(Line)
      {}

      int operator()(int one, int two)
      {
        std::cout
          << "Reporter: FunctionName() is being called by "
          << caller_ << "() in " << file_ << ":" << line_ << std::endl;
        // can use the original name here, as it is still defined
        return FunctionName(one,two);
      }
    private:
      std::string   caller_;
      std::string   file_;
      int           line_;

  };

// remove the symbol for the function, then define a new version that instead
// creates a stack temporary instance of Reporter initialized with the caller
#  undef FunctionName
#  define FunctionName Reporter(__FUNCTION__,__FILE__,__LINE__)
#endif


void Caller1()
{
  int val = FunctionName(7,9);  // <-- works for captured return value
  std::cout << "Mystery Function got " << val << std::endl;
}

void Caller2()
{
  // Works for inline as well.
  std::cout << "Mystery Function got " << FunctionName(11,13) << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  Caller1();
  Caller2();
  return 0;
}

Sample Output (Reporting)

Reporter: FunctionName() is being called by Caller1() in test.cpp:44
Mystery Function got 72
Reporter: FunctionName() is being called by Caller2() in test.cpp:51
Mystery Function got 169

Basically, anywhere that FunctionName occurs, it replaces it with Reporter(__FUNCTION__,__FILE__,__LINE__), the net effect of which is the preprocessor writing some object instancing with an immediate call to the operator() function. You can view the result (in gcc) of the preprocessor substitutions with g++ -E -DREPORT test.cpp. Caller2() becomes this:

void Caller2()
{
  std::cout << "Mystery Function got " << Reporter(__FUNCTION__,"test.cpp",51)(11,13) << std::endl;
}

You can see that __LINE__ and __FILE__ have been substituted. (I'm not sure why __FUNCTION__ still shows in the output to be honest, but the compiled version reports the right function, so it probably has something to do with multi-pass preprocessing or a gcc bug.)

Full Source Example with a Class Member Function

This is a bit more complicated, but very similar to the previous example. Instead of just replacing the call to the function, we are also replacing the class.

Like the above example, you can compile this with g++ -o test test.cpp for a non-reporting version and g++ -o test test.cpp -DREPORT for a version that displays the caller information.

#include <iostream>

class ClassName
{
  public:
    explicit ClassName(int Member)
      : member_(Member)
      {}

    int FunctionName(int one, int two)
    {
      return (++member_+one)*two;
    }

  private:
    int member_;
};

#ifdef REPORT
  // class to capture the caller and print it.  
  class ClassNameDecorator
  {
    public:
      ClassNameDecorator( int Member)
        : className_(Member)
      {}

      ClassNameDecorator& FunctionName(std::string Caller, std::string File, int Line)
      {
        std::cout
          << "Reporter: ClassName::FunctionName() is being called by "
          << Caller << "() in " << File << ":" << Line << std::endl;
        return *this;
      }
      int operator()(int one, int two)
      {
        return className_.FunctionName(one,two);
      }
    private:
      ClassName className_;
  };


// remove the symbol for the function, then define a new version that instead
// creates a stack temporary instance of ClassNameDecorator.
// FunctionName is then replaced with a version that takes the caller information
// and uses Method Chaining to allow operator() to be invoked with the original
// parameters.
#  undef ClassName
#  define ClassName ClassNameDecorator
#  undef FunctionName
#  define FunctionName FunctionName(__FUNCTION__,__FILE__,__LINE__)
#endif


void Caller1()
{
  ClassName foo(21);
  int val = foo.FunctionName(7,9);  // <-- works for captured return value
  std::cout << "Mystery Function got " << val << std::endl;
}

void Caller2()
{
  ClassName foo(42);
  // Works for inline as well.
  std::cout << "Mystery Function got " << foo.FunctionName(11,13) << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  Caller1();
  Caller2();
  return 0;
}

Here is sample output:

Reporter: ClassName::FunctionName() is being called by Caller1() in test.cpp:56
Mystery Function got 261
Reporter: ClassName::FunctionName() is being called by Caller2() in test.cpp:64
Mystery Function got 702

The high points of this version are a class that decorates the original class, and a replacement function that returns a reference to the class instance, allowing the operator() to do the actual function call.

Hope that helps someone!

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Write a function name get number, uses a reference parameter to accept an argument. The function should prompt the user to enter a number in the range of 1 through 100. The input should be validated and stored in the parameter.

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have about some example code for this? –  toxicate20 Nov 24 '12 at 11:19
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Unless there is more to the question than you explicitly asked, just rename the function and let the compiler/linker tell you where it is called.

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When I said that I was outputting it I meant at run-time. Not at compile time. –  Phil Hannent Jun 25 '12 at 11:58
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