Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a windows application in C++ and encountered the following problem when working with exceptions.

I have a base exception class from which all other exceptions derive from. In the base class I have a method for the error message of any exception. That method then returns the exception (through '*this').

Now, the problem occurs when I want to extend a derived exception and later user it in a catch block. Since the extend method is declared in the base class, the catch block catches the base class instead of the derived class. Is there any way of working around this so that the correct derived class is caught instead?

Here are some code illustrating the problem:


// DECLARATIONS

class BaseException {
    BaseException() { }

    Exception& extend( string message ) {
        // extend message

        return *this;
    }
}

class DerivedException : public BaseException {
    DerivedException() : Exception() { }
}



// RUNNING CODE

int main() {
    try {
         ...

         try {
             ...

             // Something goes wrong
             throw DerivedException( "message1" );
         }
         catch ( DerivedException& exc ) {
             throw exc.extend( "message2" );
         }
    }
    catch ( DerivedException& ) {
        // Here is where I *want* to land
    }
    }
    catch ( BaseException& ) {
        // Here is where I *do* land
    }
}

At the moment I have "solved" it by not making the extend method virtual, but declaring it in each exception with correct return type. It works, but it's not pretty.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It would be much simpler to separate the extend() call and the re-throwing of the exception:

 catch ( DerivedException& exc ) {
     exc.extend( "message2" );
     throw;
 }

This way extend() doesn't have to return anything and always the right exceptions are thrown/caught.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Even though there are no copies being made, doing it the way the OP tried to do it brings up all the same issues involved with implementing a covariant clone method (aka virtual copy constructor), which are many. –  Tyler McHenry Aug 20 '10 at 15:06
    
Ah yes, this does indeed solve the exception problem. Quite clever, that. I'll start refactoring my code right this minute! ^^ –  gablin Aug 21 '10 at 15:43
add comment

The problem is that return type of extend is 'BaseException&'. Therefore 'throw exc.extend()' is caught in the wrong exception handler.

If you want to throw the same exception, use can use the empty throw; statement. The OP code had lots of errors.

class BaseException {
public:
    BaseException() { } 

    BaseException& extend( string message ) { 
        // extend message 

        return *this; 
    } 
}; 

class DerivedException : public BaseException { 
public:
    DerivedException() : BaseException() { } 
}; 



// RUNNING CODE 

int main() { 
   try { 

      try { 
         // Something goes wrong 
         throw DerivedException(); 
      } 
      catch ( DerivedException& exc ) { 
         throw exc.extend("A"); 
      } 
   } 
   catch ( DerivedException& ) { 
      // Here is where I *want* to land 
      int i = 0;
   } 
   catch ( BaseException& ) { 
      // Here is where I *do* land 
      int i = 0;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well I didn't run the code through a compiler as I thought it would be sufficient enough to carry out my point. But agreed, code should always be compilable; I'll take note till next time. ^^ Indeed, I also suspected that the catch didn't work as expected due to it explicitly returning the base class... –  gablin Aug 21 '10 at 15:36
add comment

This can be done using the "Curiously recurring template pattern"

template <typename TExc>
class BaseException { 
    BaseException() { } 

    TExc& extend( string message ) { 
        // extend message 

        return (TExc) *this; 
    } 
} 

class DerivedException : public BaseException<DerivedException> { 
    DerivedException() : BaseException() { } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Except now you can't catch a BaseException. And yes, you could make a non-templated BaseException and then derive a TemplatedBaseException from it and use CRTP below that, but then you run into all sorts of hurt if you want to have an extend method in the non-templated BaseException class (what should it return?) –  Tyler McHenry Aug 20 '10 at 15:02
    
Yes, I also considered using a template, but as Tyler McHenry aptly pointed out there would be problems with having a non-templated BaseException; hence I abandoned this approach. –  gablin Aug 21 '10 at 15:34
add comment

You should make the extend function virtual, and return a DerivedException& in the DerivedException's override. This is legal only for special cases where the return value can be implicitly casted - such as where the original function signature returns a base class of the override function signature's return value, as I show below.

class BaseException {
public:
    BaseException() { }

    virtual BaseException& extend( std::string message ) {
        // extend message

        return *this;
    }
};

class DerivedException : public BaseException {
public:
    virtual DerivedException& extend( std::string message ) {
        return *this;
    }
    DerivedException(std::string) : BaseException() { }
};



// RUNNING CODE

int main() {
    try {
         try {
             // Something goes wrong
             throw DerivedException( "message1" );
         }
         catch ( DerivedException& exc ) {
             throw exc.extend( "message2" );
         }
    }
    catch ( DerivedException& ) {
        std::cout << "DerivedException!";
    }
    catch ( BaseException& ) {
        std::cout << "BaseException!";
    }
    std::cin.get();
}

Displays DerivedException!

share|improve this answer
    
But how does this approach really differ from what I'm currently using? Yes, the method is declared virtual, meaning that there will always be an extend() method in all exception classes; but I still must declare and implement such a method in every derived method which really does the exact same thing. That's what I wanted to avoid... –  gablin Aug 21 '10 at 15:37
    
Make it into a static templated function. It's true that you still have to write it - but it can be a one-liner. –  DeadMG Aug 21 '10 at 18:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.