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Assuming a 3 dimensional irregular matrix where y = 1.5(x) and z = .5(y).

Further assuming an object starts at 0,0,0 and must move positively in at least two dimensions, and must move in all three dimensions (x+1, y+1, z-1 is okay, x+1, y+1, z=z is not). It may move any number of "spaces", but must move the same number in all directions.

The object is allowed to wraparound (x(max +1) = x(0)).

Move said object from its starting position to (0, max(y), .5(max(z))) For z, round up for fractions (end point in 4, 6, 3 matrix becomes 0, 6, 2)

Input is an Integer (X).

Output is the list of moves you would make (extra credit for showing the number of spaces you moved)

Sample Input/Output:

X = 4
Y = 6 //(4 * 1.5)
Z = 3 // 6 / 2

0, 0, 0 //Start
2, 5, 2 // (+2, -2, +2)
1, 2, 2 // (+4, +4, +4)
3, 4, 0 // (+2, +2, -2)
1, 6, 2 // (-2, +2, +2)
3, 3, 3 // (-3, -3, -3)
1, 5, 1 // (-2, +2, -2)
0, 6, 2 // (-1, +1, -1)
7 Moves.
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So the "winner" is shortest source, regardless of how optimal the steps are? –  Mark Peters Aug 20 '10 at 20:23
    
Correct. As long as the answer is correct, the number of moves don't matter. I just want to know how many it took because I'm that kind of guy... –  AllenG Aug 20 '10 at 21:10
10  
This seems bizarre and pointless. Any back-story to the question, anything to draw our interest? –  Nas Banov Aug 20 '10 at 22:42
3  
Some of your example movement vectors seem to violate the "move positively in at least two dimensions" rule –  belisarius Aug 22 '10 at 16:05
2  
What does x equal in the matrix? Does it mean the ending x component is always 0? You seriously need to clarify what everything is. What is the input, how do you get the max values, how do you get the end point? –  Callum Rogers Aug 22 '10 at 16:37

2 Answers 2

Lua, 68 Characters

The long version below always solves the problem with one move by searching for the first all positive move that will solve problem.

x=...
y,z=x*3/2,x*3/4
a,b,c=0,y,math.ceil(z/2)
x,y,z=x+1,y+1,z+1
for i=1,math.huge do
  if (x*i)%y==b and (x*i)%z==c then x=x*i break end
end
print("0,0,0\n0,"..b..","..c.."//+"..x..",+"..x..",+"..x.."\n1 move.")

Output for x = 12:

0,0,0
0,18,5//+455,+455,+455
1 move.

Output for x = 1000:

0,0,0
0,1500,375//+557424868,+557424868,+557424868
1 move.

Seems like the search could be replaced with some simple algebraic equation. But why stop there? Rules are easier to bend in golfing then doing the actual work.

So, assuming that there is always a single 1 move answer, and that I do not have to disclose the "number of spaces you moved", here is the 68 character golfed answer:

x=...print("0,0,0\n0,"..(x*3/2)..","..math.ceil(x*3/8).."\n1 move.")
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2  
Interesting ... you proved the problem is worthless :) –  belisarius Aug 24 '10 at 3:11

Mathematica - Not Golfed

Just to see if we can get the ball rolling

... and trying to understand the problem ....

f[x_] := (
   (* Init code *)
   xmax = x;
   ymax = 3 Round[xmax]/2;
   zmax = Round[ymax]/2;
   xobj = 0;
   yobj = ymax;
   zobj = Ceiling[zmax/2];
   p = Join[Permutations[{1, 1, -1}], {{1, 1, 1}}];
   Print["X = ", xmax, "\nY = ", ymax, "\nZ = ", zmax];

   (* Loop *)
   i = 0; 
   pos = {0, 0, 0}; 
   k = "Start";
   While[
    (npos= {Mod[pos[[1]], xmax+1], Mod[pos[[2]], ymax+1], Mod[pos[[3]], zmax+1]}) 
             != {xobj, yobj, zobj}, 
      i++;
      Print[npos, " // ", k];
      pos= npos+ (k= RandomInteger[{1,xmax}] p[[RandomInteger[{1, Length[p]}]]]);
   ];
   Print[npos, " // ", k];
   Print[i, " Moves"];
   );

Invoke with

 f[4]

Sample Output

X = 4
Y = 6
Z = 3
{0,0,0} // Start
{3,4,3} // {3,-3,3}
{0,0,2} // {-3,3,3}
{2,3,1} // {-3,3,3}
{0,6,2} // {3,3,-3}
4 Moves

alt text

Not sure if I'm following the rules ...

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3  
I'm not sure anyone knows the rules, not even OP –  Callum Rogers Aug 22 '10 at 16:35

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