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I need to generate random Boolean values on a performance-critical path.

The code which I wrote for this is

std::random_device   rd;
std::uniform_int_distribution<> randomizer(0, 1);
const int val randomizer(std::mt19937(rd()));
const bool isDirectionChanged = static_cast<bool>(val);

But do not think that this is the best way to do this as I do not like doing static_cast<bool>.

On the web I have found a few more solutions

1. std::bernoulli_distribution

2. bool randbool = rand() & 1; Remember to call srand() at the beginning.

share|improve this question
7  
std::bernoulli_distribution is slow from my experience. The best way is to generate unsigned long long (for x64) and use its bits as boolean values. – Vitaliy Feb 12 at 9:04
2  
How much "randomness" do you need? After all, you can just declare uninitialised int and return its first bit. The value will be "random", but with unknown distribution. – Jakub Zaverka Feb 12 at 9:08
28  
@JakubZaverka: that's undefined behaviour - no guarantee your program will work. – Tony D Feb 12 at 9:08
2  
Try PCG: pcg-random.org – Vertexwahn Feb 12 at 9:18
11  
xkcd.com/221 – n.m. Feb 12 at 9:45
up vote 33 down vote accepted

For the purpose of performance, at a price of less "randomness" than e.g. std::mt19937_64, you can use Xorshift+ to generate 64-bit numbers and then use the bits of those numbers as pseudo-random booleans.

Quoting the Wikipedia:

This generator is one of the fastest generators passing BigCrush

Details: http://xorshift.di.unimi.it/ . There is a comparison table in the middle of the page, showing that mt19937_64 is 2 times slower and is systematic.

Below is sample code (the real code should wrap it in a class):

#include <cstdint>
#include <random>
using namespace std;

random_device rd;
/* The state must be seeded so that it is not everywhere zero. */
uint64_t s[2] = { (uint64_t(rd()) << 32) ^ (rd()),
    (uint64_t(rd()) << 32) ^ (rd()) };
uint64_t curRand;
uint8_t bit = 63;

uint64_t xorshift128plus(void) {
    uint64_t x = s[0];
    uint64_t const y = s[1];
    s[0] = y;
    x ^= x << 23; // a
    s[1] = x ^ y ^ (x >> 17) ^ (y >> 26); // b, c
    return s[1] + y;
}

bool randBool()
{
    if(bit >= 63)
    {
        curRand = xorshift128plus();
        bit = 0;
        return curRand & 1;
    }
    else
    {
        bit++;
        return curRand & (1<<bit);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
XorShift without the plus passes almost all tests and should be a little more than twice as fast. This is an additional possible choice. XorShift(+) is far underutilized. Should be the standard generator on all platforms basically. Not sure why the super heavy weight Mersenne Twister is favored so much. – usr Feb 12 at 10:23
1  
@Serge Rogatch by using bitmasks? – T M Feb 12 at 10:37
2  
@usr Because pseudorandom number generation is extremely poorly understood by most programmers. – Thomas Feb 12 at 10:43
1  
@TM, I've added the sample code. – Serge Rogatch Feb 12 at 12:52
6  
@usr: Mersenne Twister is hardly "super heavy weight". The main reason it's more popular is because Xorshift+ is much newer than MT. Xorshift+ was first published in 2014, MT has been around since 1997. – Jack Aidley Feb 12 at 13:08

Some quick benchmarks (code):

   647921509 RandomizerXorshiftPlus
   821202158 BoolGenerator2 (reusing the same buffer)
  1065582517 modified Randomizer
  1130958451 BoolGenerator2 (creating a new buffer as needed)
  1140139042 xorshift128plus
  2738780431 xorshift1024star
  4629217068 std::mt19937
  6613608092 rand()
  8606805191 std::bernoulli_distribution
 11454538279 BoolGenerator
 19288820587 std::uniform_int_distribution

For those who want ready-to-use code, I present XorShift128PlusBitShifterPseudoRandomBooleanGenerator, a tweaked version of RandomizerXorshiftPlus from the above link. On my machine, it is about as fast as @SergeRogatch's solution, but consistently about 10-20% faster when the loop count is high (≳100,000), and up to ~30% slower with smaller loop counts.

class XorShift128PlusBitShifterPseudoRandomBooleanGenerator {
public:
  bool randBool() {
    if (counter == 0) {
      counter = sizeof(GeneratorType::result_type) * CHAR_BIT;
      random_integer = generator();
    }
    return (random_integer >> --counter) & 1;
  }

private:
  class XorShift128Plus {
  public:
    using result_type = uint64_t;

    XorShift128Plus() {
      std::random_device rd;
      state[0] = rd();
      state[1] = rd();
    }

    result_type operator()() {
      auto x = state[0];
      auto y = state[1];
      state[0] = y;
      x ^= x << 23;
      state[1] = x ^ y ^ (x >> 17) ^ (y >> 26);
      return state[1] + y;
    }

  private:
    result_type state[2];
  };

  using GeneratorType = XorShift128Plus;

  GeneratorType generator;
  GeneratorType::result_type random_integer;
  int counter = 0;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. The remaining question is whether the properties of the resulting distributions are acceptable. – juanchopanza Feb 12 at 10:21
    
I think the constructor of BoolGenerator, with the random number generation, should be taken out of the measurement (it's a precomputation). BTW, I will see later if BoolGenerator could be further optimized by keeping in a separate variable a copy of the currently pointed element of the buffer. It would basically become like the "modified Randomizer", but with a buffer look up instead of a random number generation. – Antonio Feb 12 at 11:31
    
@Antonio I took the initialization/seeding into account with all other solutions as well. – tuple_cat Feb 12 at 12:00
3  
Why don't you combine Randomizer with xorshift128plus instead of mt19938 ? Shouldn't that be by far the fastest possibility ? – Falco Feb 12 at 12:36
1  
@Falco Updated benchmark with combined Xorshift+ and Randomizer. – tuple_cat Feb 12 at 14:43

A way would be to just generate a unsigned long long for every 64 random calls as stated in the comments. An example:

#include <random>
class Randomizer
{
public:
    Randomizer() : m_rand(0), counter(0), randomizer(0, std::numeric_limits<unsigned long long>::max()) {}

    bool RandomBool()
    {
        if (!counter)
        {
            m_rand = randomizer(std::mt19937(rd()));
            counter = sizeof(unsigned long long) * 8;

        }
        return (m_rand >> --counter) & 1;
    }
private:
    std::random_device  rd;
    std::uniform_int_distribution<unsigned long long> randomizer;
    unsigned long long m_rand;
    int counter;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Did you measure it against OP's example? – juanchopanza Feb 12 at 9:22
1  
You should not be creating a new random_device and uniform_int_distribution over and over again in a time critical loop. – nwp Feb 12 at 9:22
    
@nwp Good point, edited. – Gill Bates Feb 12 at 9:35
1  
I'd wager constructing mt19937 is orders of magnitude more overhead than random_device and uniform_int_distribution combined -- put that at class scope too. – ildjarn Feb 12 at 9:55
2  
If you didn't create a new std::mt19937 on each RandomBool call, this would be slightly faster than Xorshift128+, at least in my benchmarks. – tuple_cat Feb 12 at 10:06

I would prefill a (long enough) (circular) buffer of 64bit random values, and then take very quickly one bit at a time when in need of a boolean random value

#include <stdint.h>

class BoolGenerator {
  private:
  const int BUFFER_SIZE = 65536;
  uint64_t randomBuffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
  uint64_t mask;
  int counter;

  void advanceCounter {
    counter++;
    if (counter == BUFFER_SIZE) {
        counter = 0;
    }
  }

  public:
  BoolGenerator() {
    //HERE FILL YOUR BUFFER WITH A RANDOM GENERATOR
    mask = 1;
    counter = 0;
  }

  bool generate() {
    mask <<= 1;
    if (!mask) { //After 64 shifts the mask becomes zero
        mask = 1;//reset mask
        advanceCounter();//get the next value in the buffer
    }
    return randomBuffer[counter] & mask;
  }
}

Of course the class can be made general to the buffer size, the random generator, the base type (doesn't necessarily have to be uint64_t) etc.


Accessing the buffer only once every 64 calls:

#include <stdint.h> //...and much more

class BoolGenerator {
  private:
  static const int BUFFER_SIZE = 65536;
  uint64_t randomBuffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
  uint64_t currValue;
  int bufferCounter;
  int bitCounter;

  void advanceBufferCounter() {
    bufferCounter++;
    if (bufferCounter == BUFFER_SIZE) {
        bufferCounter = 0;
    }
  }

  void getNextValue() {
      currValue = randomBuffer[bufferCounter];
      bitCounter = sizeof(uint64_t) * 8;
      advanceBufferCounter();
  }

  //HERE FILL YOUR BUFFER WITH A RANDOM GENERATOR
  void initializeBuffer() {
  //Anything will do, taken from here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/19728404/2436175
      std::random_device rd;
      std::mt19937 rng(rd());
      std::uniform_int_distribution<uint64_t> uni(0,std::numeric_limits<uint64_t>::max());
      for (int i = 0; i < BUFFER_SIZE; i++ ) {
          randomBuffer[i] = uni(rng);
      }
  }

  public:
  BoolGenerator() {
      initializeBuffer();
      bufferCounter = 0;
      getNextValue();
  }

  bool generate() {
      if (!bitCounter) {
           getNextValue();
      }
      //A variation of other methods seen around
      bitCounter--;
      bool retVal = currValue & 0x01;
      currValue >>= 1;
      return retVal;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
You should probably refill the buffer when the counter == BUFFER_SIZE, to get a repeat-length in the order of random number generators... – Falco Feb 12 at 12:32
    
@Falco The time critical part (random boolean generation) would become occasionally EXTREMELY slow, which wouldn't be acceptable. The idea is that, depending on the randomness needs, one can accept a repetition of the sequence after a long enough period. – Antonio Feb 12 at 12:37
    
For a library class I would rather throw an error or explicitly state the short cycle length, because otherwise this is really hard to find. Precompution sounds good, but short cycle length will probably be a big problem. – Falco Feb 12 at 12:41
1  
@Falco What you say is correct. One should probably know in advance how many random numbers is going to need, or which repeatibility can accept, and the class should have a name clearly stating these limitations. – Antonio Feb 12 at 12:55
    
@Falco Anyway, the buffer idea seems applicable to this specific problem because what we are storing are just bits, and memory occupation is somehow reduced. Again, it depends on how much random booleans we need to generate. – Antonio Feb 12 at 13:01

Unless you have further constraints on the randomness you need, the fastest way to generate a random bool is:

bool RandomBool() { return false; }

To be more specific, there are thousands of ways to generate random boolean numbers, all satisfying different constraints, and many of them do not deliver "truly" random numbers (that includes all the other answers so far). The word "random" alone does not tell anyone what properties you really need.

share|improve this answer
    
A pseudorandom generator does not deliver truly random numbers either, there is no way to do that. – Gill Bates Feb 13 at 9:25
    
@GillBates There are indeed many ways to generate numbers that are random and less predictable than those produced by a pseudo-random generator, which I assume is what you mean by "truly random". They either use specialized hardware, or use side effects of other hardware. It remains a fact that "random" is a very poorly defined term. – Peter Feb 17 at 2:03

if performance is important, perhaps it's a good idea to generate a 32 bit random number and use each separate bit of it, something like this:

bool getRandBool() {
    static uint32_t randomnumber;
    static int i=0;
    if (i==0) {
        randomnumber = <whatever your favorite randonnumbergenerator is>;
        i=32;
    }
    return (randomnumber & 1<<--i); 
 }

this way the generation only impacts every 32th call

share|improve this answer

iI think that best way is an using of precalculated random array:

uint8_t g_rand[UINT16_MAX];
bool InitRand()
{
    for (size_t i = 0, n = UINT16_MAX; i < n; ++i)
        g_rand[i] = ::rand() & 1;
    return true;
}
bool g_inited = InitRand();
inline const uint8_t * Rand()
{
    return g_rand + (::rand()&INT16_MAX);
}

It using to fill some array dst[size]:

const size_t size = 10000;
bool dst[size];
for (size_t i = 0; i < size; i += INT16_MAX)
     memcpy(dst + i, Rand(), std::min<size_t>(INT16_MAX, size - col));

Of course you can initialize pre-calculated array with using of another random function.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you measure it against OP's example? – juanchopanza Feb 12 at 9:22
    
I use this method for initialization of big array in Rhasberry Pi by random numbers. It works much faster than calling rand(). – ErmIg Feb 12 at 9:27
2  
Be careful - the least significant bits of rand() are usually the least random ones. – Angew Feb 12 at 9:35

If performance is your only criterion, then the answer is:

bool get_random()
{
    return true; // chosen by fair coin flip.
                 // guaranteed to be random.
}

Unfortunately, the entropy of this random number is zero, but the performance is quite fast.

Since I suspect that this random number generator is not very useful to you, you will need to quantify how random you want your booleans to be. How about a cycle length of 2048? One million? 2^19937-1? Until the end of the universe?

I suspect that, since you explicitly stated that performance is your utmost concern, then a good old fashioned linear congruential generator might be "good enough". Based on this article, I'm guessing that this generator's period is around 32*((2^31)-5), or about 68 trillion iterations. If that's not "good enough", you can drop in any C++11 compatible generator you like instead of minstd_rand.

For extra credit, and a small performance hit, modify the below code to use the biased coin algorithm to remove bias in the generator.

#include <iostream>
#include <random>

bool get_random()
{
    typedef std::minstd_rand generator_type;
    typedef generator_type::result_type result_type;

    static generator_type generator;
    static unsigned int bits_remaining = 0;
    static result_type random_bits;

    if ( bits_remaining == 0 )
    {
        random_bits = generator();
        bits_remaining = sizeof( result_type ) * CHAR_BIT - 1;
    }

    return ( ( random_bits & ( 1 << bits_remaining-- ) ) != 0 );
}

int main()
{
    for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < 1000; i++ )
    {
        std::cout << " Choice " << i << ": ";
        if ( get_random() )
            std::cout << "true";
        else
            std::cout << "false";

        std::cout << std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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