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In the small script I wrote, the .append() function adds the entered item to the beginning of the list, instead of the end of that list. (As you can clearly understand, am quite new to the Python, so go easy on me)

list.append(x)
Add an item to the end of the list; equivalent to a[len(a):] = [x].

That's what is says in https://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/datastructures.html.

You can see my code below:

user_input = []
def getting_text(entered_text):
    if entered_text == "done":
        print "entering the texts are done!"
    else:
        getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering "))
        user_input.append(entered_text)

getting_text(raw_input("Enter the first text "))
print user_input

Am I misunderstanding something here, because the print function prints c,b,a instead of a,b,c (the order I entered the input is a,b,c)

share|improve this question
2  
FWIW, using recursion in Python is rarely a good idea unless you're processing a recursive data structure (eg, a tree), since Python limits the depth of recursive calls and it can't do tail call elimination. – PM 2Ring Feb 12 at 9:45
5  
If you are new to python... why are you using python2.7 that' a 5+ years old version? Just learn python3 now and, eventually if oyu need to handle legacy systems you'll learn the differences with python2. – Bakuriu Feb 12 at 12:10
    
The best online tool (decided after asking some friends), was the Codecademy, which uses the 2.7. Plus I've been told that there are not that many differences and I can switch to 3.x easily. I also enrolled in some of the 3.x courses, such as in Udemy, but haven't started yet. I'll probably switch to 3.x when I feel comfortable :) – firko Feb 12 at 13:58
up vote 28 down vote accepted

Ok, this is what's happening.

When your text isn't "done", you've programmed it so that you immediately call the function again (i.e, recursively call it). Notice how you've actually set it to append an item to the list AFTER you do the getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering ")) line.

So basically, when you add your variables, it's going to add all of the variables AFTER it's done with the recursive function.

Hence, when you type a, then it calls the function again (hasn't inputted anything to the list yet). Then you type b, then c. When you type done, the recursive bit is finished. NOW, it does user_input.append(.... HOWEVER, the order is reversed because it deals with c first since that was the latest thing.

This can be shown when you print the list inside the function:

>>> def getting_text(entered_text):
...     print user_input
...     if entered_text == "done":
...         print "entering the texts are done!"
...     else:
...             getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering "))
...             user_input.append(entered_text)
... 
>>> 
>>> getting_text(raw_input("Enter the first text "))
Enter the first text a
[]
Enter the text or write done to finish entering b
[]
Enter the text or write done to finish entering c
[]
Enter the text or write done to finish entering done
[]
entering the texts are done!
>>> user_input
['c', 'b', 'a']

Note the print statement line 2.


So how do you fix this? Simple: append to the list before you recursively call.

>>> user_input = []
>>> def getting_text(entered_text):
...     if entered_text == "done":
...         print "entering the texts are done!"
...     else:
...             user_input.append(entered_text)
...             getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering "))
... 
>>> user_input = []
>>> getting_text(raw_input("Enter the first text "))
Enter the first text a
Enter the text or write done to finish entering b
Enter the text or write done to finish entering c
Enter the text or write done to finish entering done
entering the texts are done!
>>> user_input
['a', 'b', 'c']
share|improve this answer

You are having a recursion in your script. The script steps into getting_text before appending to the list. So the append is done when the recursion function returns finally. This way you are walking the stack downwards on the return path executing the append() call waiting for execution in reverse order.

Maybe it is easier to unterstand like this:

getting_text()
    getting_text()
        getting_text()
        append()
    append()
append()

If you want to have the result in the "correct" order move the append line one up, before the getting_text() call.

share|improve this answer

Your recursive function getting_text calls itself before adding entered_text to the list. So the effect of inner calls precedes the effect of outer calls.

If you swap around

getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering "))
user_input.append(entered_text)

to

user_input.append(entered_text)
getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering "))

then the contents of user_input will be in the opposite order.

share|improve this answer

you are doing some nasty recursive stuff here: You call the function:

getting_text(entered_text)

from within it self. I'm not certan this is what you want.

I have created some thing that is ugly too, but does what you want - I think..

import sys

user_input = []
def getting_text(entered_text):
    if entered_text == "done":
        print user_input
        sys.exit(0)
    else:
        user_input.append(entered_text)

while(1):
    getting_text(raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering: "))    
share|improve this answer
1  
Calling sys.exit() inside a function is a bit drastic. Why not just return True when normal text is entered and False when "done" is entered. BTW, when you do need to exit there's a simpler way than sys.exit() : you can just do exit(). – PM 2Ring Feb 12 at 9:56
    
yep, it does exactly what I want – firko Feb 12 at 10:01
    
PM 2 Ring: You are right ... – Svend Feldt Feb 12 at 12:01

The order is backward due to recursiveness of getting_text, it should work as expected if you append the entered_text prior to the recursive call or use an iterative function like this one

user_input = []
def getting_text(entered_text):
    while (entered_text != 'done'):
        user_input.append(entered_text)
        entered_text = raw_input("Enter the text or write done to finish entering ")
    print "entering the texts are done!"
getting_text(raw_input("Enter the first text "))
print user_input
share|improve this answer
    
Well, it's possible to get the desired order by doing the append before the recursive call (as some of the other answers show). But I certainly agree that it's better to use a simple while loop here instead of recursion. – PM 2Ring Feb 12 at 9:43
    
that is also correct, thanks for the help – firko Feb 12 at 9:59

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