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Here is the code I'm using.

public class timerApp {
Runnable timerRun = new runX();
Thread thread1 = new Thread(timerRun);
public static void main(String[] args) {
    timerApp xyz = new timerApp();
    xyz.createGUI();
}
public void createGUI() {
    JButton button = new JButton("Start timer");
    JButton button2 = new JButton("Stop timer");
    JFrame frame = new JFrame();
    JLabel label = new JLabel("under_construction");
    frame.getContentPane().add(BorderLayout.NORTH,button);
    frame.getContentPane().add(BorderLayout.SOUTH,button2);
    frame.getContentPane().add(BorderLayout.CENTER,label);
    frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    frame.setSize(500,500);
    frame.setVisible(true);
    button.addActionListener(new b1L());
    button2.addActionListener(new b2L());
}
public class b1L implements ActionListener {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
        thread1.start();
    }
}
public class b2L implements ActionListener {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
        thread1.stop();
    }
  }
}

I get an error Note: timerApp.java uses or overrides a deprecated API. Note: Recompile with Xlint:deprecation for details. I started getting this after adding the stop button's listener class.

RELP!

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You get this warning as Thread's stop() method is deprecated.

Why is Thread.stop deprecated?

Because it is inherently unsafe. Stopping a thread causes it to unlock all the monitors that it has locked. (The monitors are unlocked as the ThreadDeath exception propagates up the stack.) If any of the objects previously protected by these monitors were in an inconsistent state, other threads may now view these objects in an inconsistent state. Such objects are said to be damaged. When threads operate on damaged objects, arbitrary behavior can result. This behavior may be subtle and difficult to detect, or it may be pronounced. Unlike other unchecked exceptions, ThreadDeath kills threads silently; thus, the user has no warning that his program may be corrupted. The corruption can manifest itself at any time after the actual damage occurs, even hours or days in the future.

Nice link:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/guide/misc/threadPrimitiveDeprecation.html

This link provides info related to your question for :

  • Why is Thread.stop deprecated?
  • What should I use instead of Thread.stop?
  • How do I stop a thread that waits for long periods (e.g., for input)?
  • What if a thread doesn't respond to Thread.interrupt?

Why Are Thread.stop, Thread.suspend, Thread.resume and Runtime.runFinalizersOnExit Deprecated?

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stop() is indeed deprecated. It will leave the program in an inconsistent state. Better approaches are:

  1. Thread.interrupt()
  2. Setting a boolean visible in the thread, and getting that thread to check that variable regularly

See here for more details on how to stop threads safely.

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+1 for saying what to use instead of thread.stop() –  Stephen C Aug 21 '10 at 12:54
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First of all, that's not an error. It's a warning that you're using a deprecated method.

Thread.stop() is deprecated. You can read the rationale behind this here.

Basically their argument is that there is no safe way of terminating a thread from the outside; therefore the only way you should use would be to politely ask the thread to stop:

What should I use instead of Thread.stop?

Most uses of stop should be replaced by code that simply modifies some variable to indicate that the target thread should stop running. The target thread should check this variable regularly, and return from its run method in an orderly fashion if the variable indicates that it is to stop running. (This is the approach that JavaSoft's Tutorial has always recommended.) To ensure prompt communication of the stop-request, the variable must be volatile (or access to the variable must be synchronized).

For example, suppose your applet contains the following start, stop and run methods:

private Thread blinker;

public void start() {
    blinker = new Thread(this);
    blinker.start();
}

public void stop() {
    blinker.stop();  // UNSAFE!
}

public void run() {
    Thread thisThread = Thread.currentThread();
    while (true) {
        try {
            thisThread.sleep(interval);
        } catch (InterruptedException e){
        }
        repaint();
    }
}

You can avoid the use of Thread.stop by replacing the applet's stop and run methods with:

private volatile Thread blinker;

public void stop() {
    blinker = null;
}

public void run() {
    Thread thisThread = Thread.currentThread();
    while (blinker == thisThread) {
        try {
            thisThread.sleep(interval);
        } catch (InterruptedException e){
        }
        repaint();
    }
}
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