Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this function in my head:

<head>
      window.onload = function(){
         var x = new Array(0,2,3,4,5,6,7,8);
         var y = new Array(20,10,40,30,60,50,70,10);  
         drawGraph(y,x);
      }
</head>

Can I declare the function drawGraph() somewhere in the body? Do I need to declare it before it is called?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The order does matter. You'll need to have the drawGraph() function declared before it's called.

share|improve this answer
    
and can i have window on load out of the header? deeper in the html? –  fmsf Dec 9 '08 at 18:51
    
already verified and i can, tks for the answer :) –  fmsf Dec 9 '08 at 18:55
add comment

Keep in mind that many web platforms already use the window.onload method, and owing to the fact that window.onload can be called only once, you could have a script collision. You might consider using a different method for loading your script that builds the window.onload or waits for the page load to complete.

An example without using a JavaScript framework like JQuery would look like:

function addLoadEvent(func) {
    var oldonload = window.onload;
    if (typeof window.onload != 'function') {
      window.onload = func;
    } 
    else {
      window.onload = function() {
        oldonload();

        var x = new Array(0,2,3,4,5,6,7,8);
        var y = new Array(20,10,40,30,60,50,70,10);  
        drawGraph(y,x);
      }
    }
}

An example using JQuery would look like:

  $(document).ready(function() {
    var x = new Array(0,2,3,4,5,6,7,8);
    var y = new Array(20,10,40,30,60,50,70,10);  
    drawGraph(y,x);         
  })
share|improve this answer
add comment

You should be able to have the drawGraph function anywhere in the document because it isn't called until the document is completely loaded. That means any <script> tags should have already been parsed and executed.

While order does matter, how you declare functions also matters. If you use the declaration syntax,...

function identifier ( arglist ) { body }

...then it will exist before the script is even executed regardless of where in the script you declared it (I'm not sure if this is standard for all interpreters, but it seems to apply within Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer). However, that only applies to a single <script> tag. Declarations in other script tags won't exist until those scripts are parsed, which is after preceding scripts have executed.

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            function check_existance()
            {
                if(!check_existance.i)
                    check_existance.i = 0;

                document.write("<h5>Call : " + ++check_existance.i + "</h5>" +
                      "func1 : " + typeof func1 + "<br />" +
                      "func2 : " + typeof func2 + "<br />" +
                      "func3 : " + typeof func3 + "<br />" +
                      "func4 : " + typeof func4 + "<br />");
            }
        </script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            check_existance();

            func1 = function()
                    {
                        alert("func1");
                    };

            check_existance();

            function func2()
            {
                alert("func2");
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            check_existance();

            func3 = function()
                    {
                        alert("func3");
                    };

            check_existance();

            function func4()
            {
                alert("func4");
            }
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

Output:

Call : 1
func1 : undefined
func2 : function
func3 : undefined
func4 : undefined

Call : 2
func1 : function
func2 : function
func3 : undefined
func4 : undefined

Call : 3
func1 : function
func2 : function
func3 : undefined
func4 : function

Call : 4
func1 : function
func2 : function
func3 : function
func4 : function

I believe YSlow recommends <script> tags be placed at the bottom of the document (I guess preceding the closing </body> tag) because of the way they are loaded in browsers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.