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This code compiles on msvc/g++:

class A{
protected:
    int i;
    class B{
    public:
        A* a;
        B(A* a_)
        :a(a_){
        }
        void doSomething(){
            if (a)
                a->i = 0;//<---- this part
        }       
    };
public:
    A()
    :i(0){
    }
};

As you can see, B gets access to "protected" section of enclosing class, although it isn't declared as friend.

Is this a standard(standard-conforming) behavior?

I use this feature sometimes, but I don't remember a rule saying that nested protected class should automatically get access to all protected data of enclosing class.

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Dupe question. I'm not going to search for the original now, though. :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 21 '10 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In the C++03 standard, 11.8p1 says:

The members of a nested class have no special access to members of an enclosing class.

However, the resolution for defect report 45 (to the standard) states the opposite, and hence defines the behavior you see:

A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member.

In C++0x the text of 11.8 has been changed to reflect this fact, so this is valid behavior for both C++03 and C++0x conforming compilers.

See also this thread from the cprogramming.com forums.

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2  
+1 Good answer. However, if you google this, there is some IBM XL compiler documentation that only mentions the first part you've stated and implies that the OP's code would not compile. So the portable thing to do currently, until C++0x is widely implemented, would be to declare the nested class as a friend within the enclosing class. –  Praetorian Aug 21 '10 at 15:23
    
Good find. A link would be nice for the sake of completeness. :) –  Håvard S Aug 21 '10 at 15:45
    
I was being lazy earlier :-), here's the link. publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v101v121/… –  Praetorian Aug 21 '10 at 15:58
    
@Praetorian I would be included to declare the nested class as a friend because it better describes how I intend the code to behave, so I gave your comment +1 too –  Chris Huang-Leaver Aug 24 '10 at 9:01

I don't have a copy of C++03 handy but from a draft (n3090) of C++0x:

11.8 Nested classes

1 A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member. The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules (Clause 11) shall be obeyed.

[ Example:

class E {
    int x;
    class B { };
    class I {
        B b; // OK: E::I can access E::B
        int y;
        void f(E* p, int i) {
            p->x = i; // OK: E::I can access E::x
        }
    };
    int g(I* p) {
        return p->y; // error: I::y is private
    }
};

So at least in the next standard, enclosed classes can access the outer class' members as any normal member function would.

Update: This isn't allowed in the current standard. But a defect report (DR 45) was filed to fix this. (SigTerm's edit took this one out. Please, be careful.)

Update #2: I tried with VS2010, g++ (4.0.1 Apple) with -Wall -ansi -pedantic -std=c++98 and Comeau (4.3.10.1) in strict C++03 mode with C++0x extensions disabled -- all of them seem to accept access to the outer class private members in the inner class members.

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Refer $9.7/1.

"The nested class is in the scope of its enclosing class. Except by using explicit pointers, references, and object names, declarations in a nested class can use only type names, static members, and enumerators from the enclosing class."

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Is this a standard(standard-conforming) behavior?

No.

According to C++-2003

Section 11.8.1

Nested classes

The members of a nested class have no special access to members of an enclosing class, nor to classes or functions that have granted friendship to an enclosing class; the usual access rules (clause 11) shall be obeyed. The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules (clause 11) shall be obeyed.

[Example:
class E {

    int x;
    class B { };
    class I {

       B b;  //error: E::B is private
       int y;
       void f(E* p, int i)
       {
             p->x = i;           //error: E::x is private
       }
    };
    int g(I* p)
    {
           return p->y;  //error: I::y is private
    }
};
—end example]

But there is a slight modification to that section in ISO/IEC N 3092 which says

A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member. The members of an enclosing class have no special access to members of a nested class; the usual access rules (Clause 11) shall be obeyed.

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