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This has to be a common question that all programmers have from time to time. How do I read a line from a text file? Then the next question is always how do i write it back.

Of course most of you use a high level framework in day to day programming (which are fine to use in answers) but sometimes it's nice to know how to do it at a low level too.

I myself know how to do it in C, C++ and Objective-C, but it sure would be handy to see how it's done in all of the popular languages, if only to help us make a better decision about what language to do our file io in. In particular I think it would be interesting to see how its done in the string manipulation languages, like: python, ruby and of course perl.

So I figure here we can create a community resource that we can all star to our profiles and refer to when we need to do file I/O in some new language. Not to mention the exposure we will all get to languages that we don't deal with on a day to day basis.

This is how you need to answer:

  1. Create a new text file called "fileio.txt"
  2. Write the first line "hello" to the text file.
  3. Append the second line "world" to the text file.
  4. Read the second line "world" into an input string.
  5. Print the input string to the console.

Clarification:

  • You should show how to do this in one programming language per answer only.
  • Assume that the text file doesn't exist beforehand
  • You don't need to reopen the text file after writing the first line

No particular limit on the language. C, C++, C#, Java, Objective-C are all great.

If you know how to do it in Prolog, Haskell, Fortran, Lisp, or Basic then please go right ahead =)

Votes:

Vote up answers which have good naming conventions, and are easy to understand.

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9  
The problem with this is that it won't show up in searches for a specific language as it's not, nor can it be, tagged with every language. –  ChrisF Aug 21 '10 at 17:50
21  
I don't understand why this question is closed. Isn't the purpose of this site to help people find information? If someone knows how to do something (like IO) in C, and wants to learn how to do the same thing in Python, this could help them by allowing them to see both side by side. –  Slapout Aug 21 '10 at 18:34
18  
I also don't understand why this is closed. It seems like it's just because it doesn't include the words "...in the least amount of characters..." which is pretty silly. Code golf is a fun exercise. But is it really useful to make all the rosetta-stone questions have obfuscated, tiny code in all the answers? –  kharybdis Aug 21 '10 at 18:38
12  
I don't understand how this is fits a Q&A site: at least with code golf, there's a somewhat objective standard by which to vote on answers: the shortest or most clever answer gets the most votes. With this: what is it, how many people like Haskell? Questions like this are like trying to shoehorn every possible type of content into a system that's designed for only one. What's wrong with the rest of the internet for handling this? –  user113292 Aug 21 '10 at 21:40
11  
Why this doesn't work well. No information about the pros and cons of each approach (what languages support only one way?). No discussion of the trade offs and deep issues in each language. Limited scope which implies that the need for a bajiliion separate "in Every Language" questions. And most of all there is no community moderation of the quality of each answer. Why do I say no moderation when people are voting on them? Because there is supposed to be only one answer for each language, and people wont read enough answers to see multiple alternatives in their field. –  dmckee Aug 21 '10 at 21:44
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locked by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 5:40

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

closed as not a real question by Bill the Lizard Aug 23 '10 at 1:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

80 Answers

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Python 3

with open('fileio.txt', 'w') as f:
   f.write('hello')
with open('fileio.txt', 'a') as f:
   f.write('\nworld')
with open('fileio.txt') as f:
   s = f.readlines()[1]
print(s)

Clarifications

  • readlines() returns a list of all the lines in the file. Therefore, the invokation of readlines() results in reading each and every line of the file. In that particular case it's fine to use readlines() because we have to read the entire file anyway (we want its last line). But if our file contains many lines and we just want to print its nth line, it's unnecessary to read the entire file. Here are some better ways to get the nth line of a file in Python: What substitutes xreadlines() in Python 3?.

  • What is this with statement? The with statement starts a code block where you can use the variable f as a stream object returned from the call to open(). When the with block ends, python calls f.close() automatically. This guarantees the file will be closed when you exit the with block no matter how or when you exit the block (even if you exit it via an unhandled exception). You could call f.close() explicitly, but what if your code raises an exception and you don't get to the f.close() call? That's why the with statement is useful.

  • You don't need to reopen the file before each operation. You can write the whole code inside one with block.

    with open('fileio.txt', 'w+') as f:
        f.write('hello')
        f.write('\nworld')
        s = f.readlines()[1]
    print(s)
    

    I used three with blocks to emphsize the difference between the three operations: write (mode 'w'), append (mode 'a'), read (mode 'r', the default).

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19  
I really don't think anyone should ever write readlines()[1] in example code. In this case you may know the file only has two lines, but someone else blithely assuming it's a good solution might try it on a million-line file and get a rather nasty surprise. –  Porculus Aug 21 '10 at 20:42
14  
@Porculus with readlines() we don't go through all the lines in the file. This is python 3. readlines() returns an iterator (not a list). Therefore only the first two lines of the file will be read. This is similar to xreadlines() in python 2 (which doesn't exist in python 3). –  snakile Aug 21 '10 at 21:35
7  
@snakile: could you please cite something in support of readlines() returns an iterator (not a list) Just a note: you typically cannot index an iterator. –  SilentGhost Aug 22 '10 at 9:36
8  
@SilentGhost I'm quoting "Dive into Python 3": "The readlines() method now returns an iterator, so it is just as efficient as xreadlines() was in Python 2". Search this statement in: diveintopython3.org/porting-code-to-python-3-with-2to3.html . Second, in python 3 you can index an iterator. Type range(10)[4] in the shell (range() also returns an iterator in Python 3 in contrary to python 2 where range() returns a list). Note that range(N)[i] is done in O(i), not O(1) and not O(N). –  snakile Aug 22 '10 at 10:23
5  
@snakile: Your comments are wrong on several levels. First, readlines returns a list in Python 3 (test it and see). So the code given will read the entire file. Second, iterators can not be indexed in Python 2 or 3. The range object has special support for indexing, which is done in O(1). –  interjay Aug 22 '10 at 17:57
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LOLCODE

The specs are sketchy to say the least, but I did the best I could. Let the downvoting begin! :) I still find it a fun exercise.

HAI
CAN HAS STDIO?
PLZ OPEN FILE "FILEIO.TXT" ITZ "TehFilez"?
    AWSUM THX
        BTW #There is no standard way to output to files yet...
        VISIBLE "Hello" ON TehFilez
        BTW #There isn't a standard way to append to files either...
        MOAR VISIBLE "World" ON TehFilez
        GIMMEH LINES TehLinez OUTTA TehFilez
        I HAS A SecondLine ITZ 1 IN MAH TehLinez
        VISIBLE SecondLine
    O NOES
        VISIBLE "OH NOES!!!"
KTHXBYE
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28  
I don't think there's any other language out there to have this property to, literally, make me... lol. –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 21 '10 at 23:46
85  
Is it sad that I think LOLCODE is more readable than anything else I've seen? –  Joel Aug 22 '10 at 1:15
13  
It's intersting how much it feels like a natural language. –  Abhinav Sarkar Aug 22 '10 at 5:23
19  
Saying that you expect to be downvoted is a guarantee for upvotes on SO because reverse psychology is a reflex action for a programmer. –  Brock Woolf Aug 22 '10 at 5:42
13  
The PLZ ? / AWSUM THX / O NOES is just terrific. This seems kinda almighty to me. –  Calvin1602 Aug 22 '10 at 10:32
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Brain***k

,------------------------------------------------>,------------------------------------------------>,------------------------------------------------>[-]+++++++++>[-]+++++++++>[-]+++++++++<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>>+<<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]>>[-]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<[>>>>+>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<<<->>>->>>>>[-]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<[>>>>+>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>][-]<<<<<<<[>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]<<<<[>>>+>+<<<<-]>>>>[<<<<+>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<<->>>->>>>[-]<<<<<<<[>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]<<<<[>>>+>+<<<<-]>>>>[<<<<+>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>][-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<->>>->>>[-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>]<[-]+<[-]+<<<<<<[>>>>>>[-]<<<<<<[-]]>>>>>>[[-]+<<<<<[>>>>>[-]<<<<<[-]]>>>>>[[-]+<<<<[>>>>[-]<<<<[-]]>>>>[[-]+<<<[>>>[-]<<<[-]]>>>[[-]+<<[>>[-]<<[-]]>>[[-]+<[>[-]<[-]]>[[-]+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.-...>[-]<[-]]<>[-]]<<>>[-]]<<<>>>[-]]<<<<>>>>[-],------------------------------------------------>,------------------------------------------------>,------------------------------------------------>[-]+++++++++>[-]+++++++++>[-]+++++++++<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>>+<<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]>>[-]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<[>>>>+>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<<<->>>->>>>>[-]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]<<<<<[>>>>+>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>][-]<<<<<<<[>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]<<<<[>>>+>+<<<<-]>>>>[<<<<+>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<<->>>->>>>[-]<<<<<<<[>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]<<<<[>>>+>+<<<<-]>>>>[<<<<+>>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>][-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<->>>->>>[-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>]<[-]+<[-]+<<<<<<[>>>>>>[-]<<<<<<[-]]>>>>>>[[-]+<<<<<[>>>>>[-]<<<<<[-]]>>>>>[[-]+<<<<[>>>>[-]<<<<[-]]>>>>[[-]+<<<[>>>[-]<<<[-]]>>>[[-]+<<[>>[-]<<[-]]>>[[-]+<[>[-]<[-]]>[[-]+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.-...>[-]<[-]]<>[-]]<<>>[-]]<<<>>>[-]]<<<<>>>>[-]]<<<<<>>>>>[-]]<<<<<<>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]>[-]++++++++++<<+<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>>>>[-]<<<<<[>>>+>>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<->>->>>[-]<<<<<[>>>+>>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>]<<<<[-]+<[>[-]<[-]]>[[-]+>[<[-]>[-]]<[<<<<<<<[-]<+>>>>>>>>[-]]><[-]]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]>[-]++++++++++>>>[-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<->>>->>>[-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>]<<<<[-]+<<[>>[-]<<[-]]>>[[-]+>[<[-]>[-]]<[<<<<<<<<[-]<+>>>>>>>>>[-]]><[-]]<<<<<<<<<++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>>>>>>>>[-]]]<<<<<>>>>>[-]]<<<<<<>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>+<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>-]>[-]++++++++++<<+<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>>>>[-]<<<<<[>>>+>>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<->>->>>[-]<<<<<[>>>+>>+<<<<<-]>>>>>[<<<<<+>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>]<<<<[-]+<[>[-]<[-]]>[[-]+>[<[-]>[-]]<[<<<<<<<[-]<+>>>>>>>>[-]]><[-]]<<<<<<<<[>>>>>>+>>+<<<<<<<<-]>>>>>>>>[<<<<<<<<+>>>>>>>>-]>[-]++++++++++>>>[-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>[<<<<<<->>>->>>[-]<<<<<<[>>>>+>>+<<<<<<-]>>>>>>[<<<<<<+>>>>>>-]<<<[>>+>+<<<-]>>>[<<<+>>>-][-]<<[>>[-]<[>[-]+<[-]]<[-]]>[-]>]<<<<[-]+<<[>>[-]<<[-]]>>[[-]+>[<[-]>[-]]<[<<<<<<<<[-]<+>>>>>>>>>[-]]><[-]]<<<<<<<<<++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++.>>>>>>>>[-]]
share
1  
Hah, I love it! –  Tom Gullen Aug 22 '10 at 13:29
2  
I just want to say f*k. –  kirk.burleson Aug 22 '10 at 15:48
26  
Did you miss a '-'? ;) –  Aiden Bell Aug 22 '10 at 19:53
2  
Oh the effort. Just for the record, how much time did it took to write ? –  Riduidel Aug 24 '10 at 9:03
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COBOL

Since nobody else did......

IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID.  WriteDemo.
AUTHOR.  Mark Mullin.
* Hey, I don't even have a cobol compiler

ENVIRONMENT DIVISION.
INPUT-OUTPUT SECTION.
FILE-CONTROL.
    SELECT StudentFile ASSIGN TO "STUDENTS.DAT"
        ORGANIZATION IS LINE SEQUENTIAL.

DATA DIVISION.
FILE SECTION.
FD TestFile.
01 TestData.
   02  LineNum        PIC X.
   02  LineText       PIC X(72).

PROCEDURE DIVISION.
Begin.
    OPEN OUTPUT TestFile
    DISPLAY "This language is still around."

    PERFORM GetFileDetails
    PERFORM UNTIL TestData = SPACES
       WRITE TestData 
       PERFORM GetStudentDetails
    END-PERFORM
    CLOSE TestFile
    STOP RUN.

GetFileDetails.
    DISPLAY "Enter - Line number, some text"
    DISPLAY "NXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX"
    ACCEPT  TestData.
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2  
This should be voted up no less than 1 million times for pure awesomeness +1 –  Brock Woolf Aug 22 '10 at 15:24
1  
+1 for "This language is still around." =D –  missingfaktor Aug 23 '10 at 7:19
3  
Be careful when trying this at home. Your cobol compiler might not like these modern variable-length lines... –  Stephan Eggermont Aug 23 '10 at 9:31
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Haskell

main :: IO ()
main = let filePath = "fileio.txt" in
       do writeFile filePath "hello"
          appendFile filePath "\nworld"
          fileLines <- readFile filePath
          let secondLine = (lines fileLines) !! 1
          putStrLn secondLine

If you just want to read/write a file:

main :: IO ()
main = readFile "somefile.txt" >>= writeFile "someotherfile.txt" 
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7  
Ahh the 'Almighty' Haskell. Thanks for your contribution :) –  Brock Woolf Aug 21 '10 at 16:53
3  
@Andreas Rejbrand I'm almost sure he forgot a 'be' –  Federico Culloca Aug 21 '10 at 18:38
4  
There are a number of other approaches to basic I/O in Haskell that become useful / important in Haskell once you're doing certain types of apps. The text and bytestring packages on cabal/hackage let you deal with various encodings, and various iteratee style packages such as iteratee and enumerate represent a "best known abstraction" for doing incremental io. Also important are parsing libs like parsec and the incremental bytestring only attoparsec lib. Haskellers have taken a very thorough approach to exploring io design choices. Nonviable examples include lazy io and continuations –  Carter Tazio Schonwald Aug 22 '10 at 0:11
4  
Yuji: basically, by cheating. Haskell is a pure functional language, except for anything of type IO a, which has special compiler support for side effects. (Purity is preserved elsewhere because anything which performs or observes a side effect is of type IO a, so the type system ensures the rest of your program stays pure.) –  Sam Stokes Aug 22 '10 at 7:54
4  
It so happens that IO is a monad, but that's not why it's allowed to do side effects. Being a monad is what lets you write that imperative-looking syntax: it also makes sure (also with special language support) the side effects happen in a sensible order, so you don't read from the file before you write to it, etc. –  Sam Stokes Aug 22 '10 at 8:00
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Ruby

PATH = 'fileio.txt'
File.open(PATH, 'w') { |file| file.puts "hello" }
File.open(PATH, 'a') { |file| file.puts "world" }
puts line = File.readlines(PATH).last
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2  
+1 Nice, but to be strict, you don't put the input into a variable before writing it to console. –  Lasse Espeholt Aug 21 '10 at 17:10
3  
@lasseespeholt, you're right. I fixed it. –  Wayne Conrad Aug 21 '10 at 19:56
5  
No reason to uppercase varname and say 'PATH'. Just say 'path'. –  OTZ Aug 22 '10 at 9:18
2  
@otz It's a constant. He could have called it 'Path' though, a constant in Ruby just has to start with an uppercase letter. –  Sirupsen Aug 22 '10 at 10:01
1  
@Thomas Ahle: when using File.open with a block, the file is opened, passed to the block, and then closed automatically. –  Matchu Aug 23 '10 at 21:25
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D

module d_io;

import std.stdio;


void main()
{
    auto f = File("fileio.txt", "w");
    f.writeln("hello");
    f.writeln("world");

    f.open("fileio.txt", "r");
    f.readln;
    auto s = f.readln;
    writeln(s);
}
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10  
+1, So much more beautiful and readable than the C++ version! I dream of a day when D completely replaces C and C++. :-) –  missingfaktor Aug 22 '10 at 6:31
10  
Nice. Maybe I should learn D some day. –  helpermethod Aug 22 '10 at 20:44
add comment

C#

string path = "fileio.txt";
File.WriteAllLines(path, new[] { "hello"}); //Will end it with Environment.NewLine
File.AppendAllText(path, "world");

string secondLine = File.ReadLines(path).ElementAt(1);
Console.WriteLine(secondLine);

File.ReadLines(path).ElementAt(1) is .Net 4.0 only, the alternative is File.ReadAllLines(path)[1] which parses the whole file into an array.

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4  
Why downvote? please comment –  Lasse Espeholt Aug 21 '10 at 23:20
13  
NOTE: File.ReadLines is specific to .NET 4 –  kirk.burleson Aug 22 '10 at 14:16
5  
What an unpleasant looking syntax C# has –  Aiden Bell Aug 22 '10 at 19:45
3  
@Aiden Bell: relative to which language? –  arriu Aug 24 '10 at 2:15
2  
@Aiden Bell - This answer is trying to be succinct over readable. There are a lot "nice" ways of achieving the same thing in C#. See dotnetperls.com/file-handling for more realistic examples. –  Dan Diplo Aug 24 '10 at 9:48
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ANSI C

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int /*ARGSUSED*/
main(char *argv[0], int argc) {
   FILE *file;
   char buf[128];

   if (!(file = fopen("fileio.txt", "w")) {
      perror("couldn't open for writing fileio.txt");
      exit(1);
   }

   fprintf(file, "hello");
   fclose(file);

   if (!(file = fopen("fileio.txt", "a")) {
      perror("couldn't opened for appening fileio.txt");
      exit(1);
   }

   fprintf(file, "\nworld");
   fclose(file);

   if (!(file = fopen("fileio.txt", "r")) {
      perror("couldn't open for reading fileio.txt");
      exit(1);
   }

   fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), file);
   fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), file);

   fclose(file);

   puts(buf);

   return 0;
}
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2  
Because the second line is the one that we want to print to stdout –  JeremyP Aug 22 '10 at 15:40
1  
#include <stdio.h> int main(void) { FILE file; char buf[128]; file = fopen("fileio.txt", "w"); if (!file) goto error; fputs("hello\n", file); fflush(file); fputs("world\n", file); fclose(file); file = fopen("fileio.txt", "r"); if (!file) goto error; fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), file); / skip 'hello' / fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), file); / get 'word' */ fclose(file); fputs(buf, stdout); return 0; error: fputs("Couldn't open file\n", stderr); return 1; } –  felipec Aug 24 '10 at 0:38
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Shell Script (UNIX)

#!/bin/sh
echo "hello" > fileio.txt
echo "world" >> fileio.txt
LINE=`sed -ne2p fileio.txt`
echo $LINE

Actually the sed -n "2p" part prints the second line, but the question asks for the second line to be stored in a variable and then printed, so... :)

share
9  
I don't know why, but I love this :) –  Federico Culloca Aug 21 '10 at 18:52
show 6 more comments

x86 Assembler (NASM) on Linux

I haven't touched asm in 7 years, so I had to use google a bit to hack this together, but still, it works ;) I know it's not 100% correct, but hey :D

OK, it doesn't work. sorry bout this. while it does print world in the end, it doesn't print it from the file, but from the ecx which is set on line 27.

section .data
hello db 'hello',10
helloLen equ $-hello
world db 'world',10
worldLen equ $-world
helloFile db 'hello.txt'

section .text
global _start

_start:
mov eax,8
mov ebx,helloFile
mov ecx,00644Q
int 80h

mov ebx,eax

mov eax,4
mov ecx, hello
mov edx, helloLen
int 80h

mov eax,4
mov ecx, world
mov edx, worldLen
int 80h

mov eax,6
int 80h

mov eax,5
mov ebx,helloFile
int 80h

mov eax,3
int 80h

mov eax,4
mov ebx,1
int 80h

xor ebx,ebx
mov eax,1
int 80h

References used: http://www.cin.ufpe.br/~if817/arquivos/asmtut/quickstart.html

http://bluemaster.iu.hio.no/edu/dark/lin-asm/syscalls.html

http://www.digilife.be/quickreferences/QRC/LINUX%20System%20Call%20Quick%20Reference.pdf

share
1  
thanks for contributing +1 –  Brock Woolf Aug 22 '10 at 3:52
4  
What's kind of funny is that the example in C, which is supposed to be a higher level language, is about as long as this one... =) –  Jani Hartikainen Aug 24 '10 at 7:42
1  
@Jani: But at least it's somewhat easier to understand. –  sbi Sep 19 '10 at 7:22
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JavaScript - node.js

First, lots of nested callbacks.

var fs   = require("fs");
var sys  = require("sys");
var path = "fileio.txt";

fs.writeFile(path, "hello", function (error) {
    fs.open(path, "a", 0666, function (error, file) {
        fs.write(file, "\nworld", null, "utf-8", function () {
            fs.close(file, function (error) {
                fs.readFile(path, "utf-8", function (error, data) {
                    var lines = data.split("\n");
                    sys.puts(lines[1]);
                });
            });
        });
    });
});

A little bit cleaner:

var writeString = function (string, nextAction) {
    fs.writeFile(path, string, nextAction);
};

var appendString = function (string, nextAction) {
    return function (error, file) {
        fs.open(path, "a", 0666, function (error, file) {
            fs.write(file, string, null, "utf-8", function () {
                fs.close(file, nextAction);
            });
        });
    };
};

var readLine = function (index, nextAction) {
    return function (error) {
        fs.readFile(path, "utf-8", function (error, data) {
            var lines = data.split("\n");
            nextAction(lines[index]);
        });
    };
};

var writeToConsole = function (line) {
    sys.puts(line);
};

writeString("hello", appendString("\nworld", readLine(1, writeToConsole)));
share
14  
Is }); a js smiley? –  Hans Passant Aug 21 '10 at 23:22
4  
@Dave, it's not the JS found in the browsers. I mean, syntactically and semantically, it's the same JS, just the standard library is different. I used the stdlib of the node.js platform. See nodejs.org –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 22 '10 at 0:52
5  
This code is crying out for continuations. I can hear its tears. –  Matt Aug 22 '10 at 11:07
1  
JS is the new Lisp –  kizzx2 Aug 23 '10 at 17:03
2  
Isn't it funny the number of lines is almost matching that of the ASM solution downstairs? –  kizzx2 Aug 23 '10 at 17:04
show 6 more comments

Common Lisp

(defun main ()
  (with-open-file (s "fileio.txt" :direction :output :if-exists :supersede)
    (format s "hello"))
  (with-open-file (s "fileio.txt" :direction :io :if-exists :append)
    (format s "~%world")
    (file-position s 0)
    (loop repeat 2 for line = (read-line s nil nil) finally (print line))))
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1  
for a language called "lisp" there should be a lot more "s" letters involved :) –  iWasRobbed Aug 29 '10 at 21:57
add comment

PowerShell

sc fileio.txt 'hello'
ac fileio.txt 'world'
$line = (gc fileio.txt)[1]
$line
share
3  
This is nice & clean. Yay powershell. –  Jay Bazuzi Aug 21 '10 at 21:59
4  
Damn, is there anything shorter?? –  user247077 Aug 23 '10 at 20:11
show 1 more comment

Shell Script

Here's a shell script using just builtin commands, rather than invoking external commands such as sed or tail as previous responses have done.

#!/bin/sh

echo hello > fileio.txt             # Print "hello" to fileio.txt
echo world >> fileio.txt            # Print "world" to fileio.txt, appending
                                    # to what is already there
{ read input; read input; } < fileio.txt  
                                    # Read the first two lines of fileio.txt,
                                    # storing the second in $input
echo $input                         # Print the contents of $input

When writing significant shell scripts, it is advisable to use builtins as much as possible, since spawning a separate process can be slow; from a quick test on my machine, the sed solution is about 20 times slower than using read. If you're going to call sed once, as in this case, it doesn't really matter much, as it will execute more quickly than you can notice, but if you're going to execute it hundreds or thousands of times, it can add up.

For those unfamiliar with the syntax, { and } execute a list of commands in the current shell environment (as opposed to ( and ) which create a subshell; we need to be operating in the current shell environment, so we can use the value of the variable later). We need to group the commands together in order to have them both operate on the same input stream, created by redirecting from fileio.txt; if we simply ran read < fileio.txt; read input < fileio.txt, we would just get the first line, as the file would be closed and re-opened between the two commands. Due to an idiosyncrasy of shell syntax ({ and } are reserved words, as opposed to metacharacters), we need to separate the { and } from the rest of the commands with spaces, and terminate the list of commands with a ;.

The read builtin takes as an argument the names of variables to read into. It consumes a line of input, breaks the input by whitespace (technically, it breaks it according to the contents of $IFS, which defaults to a space character, where a space character means split it on any of space, tab, or newline), assigns each word to the variable names given in order, and assigns the remainder of the line to the last variable. Since we're just supplying one variable, it just puts the whole line in that variable. We reuse the $input variable, since we don't care what's on the first line (if we're using Bash we could just not supply a variable name, but to be portable, you must always supply at least one name).

Note that while you can read lines one at a time, like I do here, a much more common pattern would be to wrap it in a while loop:

while read foo bar baz
do
  process $foo $bar $baz
done < input.txt
share
3  
Very nice. I learned something (albeit temporarily). –  Potatoswatter Aug 22 '10 at 4:53
show 2 more comments

Clojure

(use '[clojure.java.io :only (reader)])

(let [file-name "fileio.txt"]
  (spit file-name "hello")
  (spit file-name "\nworld" :append true)
  (println (second (line-seq (reader file-name)))))

Or equivalently, using the threading macro -> (also known as the paren remover):

(use '[clojure.java.io :only (reader)])

(let [file-name "fileio.txt"] 
  (spit file-name "hello") 
  (spit file-name "\nworld" :append true) 
  (-> file-name reader line-seq second println))
share
7  
+1 Clojure rocks! –  helpermethod Aug 21 '10 at 20:11
1  
WTF, for the last 50 years almost nobody said Lisp/Scheme rocks! –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 21 '10 at 23:41
11  
Wait, spit is really the name of the write-to-file function? –  Sam Stokes Aug 22 '10 at 8:03
4  
Clojure definitely does not rock! –  kirk.burleson Aug 22 '10 at 15:31
4  
@kirk.burleson Rocks more than Java, certainly. :) –  Rayne Aug 23 '10 at 19:09
show 4 more comments

F#

let path = "fileio.txt"
File.WriteAllText(path, "hello")
File.AppendAllText(path, "\nworld")

let secondLine = File.ReadLines path |> Seq.nth 1
printfn "%s" secondLine
share
1  
F#. Nice. Thanks for your contribution. –  Brock Woolf Aug 21 '10 at 17:32
add comment

BASIC

I haven't used BASIC in almost 10 years, but this question gave me a reason to quickly brush up my knowledge. :)

OPEN "fileio.txt" FOR OUTPUT AS 1
PRINT #1, "hello"
PRINT #1, "world"
CLOSE 1

OPEN "fileio.txt" FOR INPUT AS 1
LINE INPUT #1, A$
LINE INPUT #1, A$
CLOSE 1

PRINT A$
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show 5 more comments

Objective-C

NSFileHandle *fh = [NSFileHandle fileHandleForUpdatingAtPath:@"fileio.txt"];

[[NSFileManager defaultManager] createFileAtPath:@"fileio.txt" contents:nil attributes:nil];

[fh writeData:[@"hello" dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]];
[fh writeData:[@"\nworld" dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding]];

NSArray *linesInFile = [[[NSString stringWithContentsOfFile:@"fileio.txt" 
                                             encoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding 
                                                error:nil] stringByStandardizingPath] 
                          componentsSeparatedByString:@"\n"];

NSLog(@"%@", [linesInFile objectAtIndex:1]);
share
17  
I've never liked Objective-C. The syntax just seems so foreign when coming from a language like Java. –  Faisal Abid Aug 21 '10 at 17:43
5  
The secret to Objective-C is that Xcode does all the code completion for you. You don't have to remember the long method names. They certainly make your code much more readable though –  Brock Woolf Aug 21 '10 at 19:44
7  
And i thought the c++ syntax already looked the worst. –  Toad Aug 21 '10 at 20:58
6  
Objective-C only looks bad because the Stackoverflow syntax highlighter doesn't get coloured correctly. –  Brock Woolf Aug 22 '10 at 3:44
4  
I can't believe this is so far down the list! Also the Java guys commenting that Objective-C is ugly, did you see how many lines it took to write the same file? I used to be a Java enthusiast, but I think Objective-C has crept it's way into my heart. –  Kyle Aug 24 '10 at 11:20
show 8 more comments

Perl

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.10.0;
use utf8;
use strict;
use autodie;
use warnings qw<  FATAL all     >;
use open     qw< :std  :utf8    >;

use English  qw< -no_match_vars >;

# and the last shall be first
END { close(STDOUT) }

my $filename = "fileio.txt";
my($handle, @lines);

$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR = $OUTPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR = "\n";

open($handle, ">",  $filename);
print $handle "hello";
close($handle);

open($handle, ">>", $filename);
print $handle "world";
close($handle);

open($handle, "<",  $filename);
chomp(@lines = <$handle>);
close($handle);

print STDOUT $lines[1];
share
4  
o.O perl i can read... ;) –  RCIX Aug 21 '10 at 20:53
15  
what about lexical filehandles, 3 argument open? –  MkV Aug 21 '10 at 20:59
6  
Non-lexical filehandles should never be used on Stack Overflow. There is rarely a need for them in practice, and beginners should not ever be shown that that they even exist. –  Ether Aug 23 '10 at 4:01
4  
Same goes for two argument open: You should never use it on Stack Overflow, and probably not in practice. –  rpkelly Aug 24 '10 at 1:46
2  
I use 3-arg open and lexical filehandles so much I practically consider it a syntax error when I see it. And so it should be. /me ponders writing a module to make it so. –  Kent Fredric Aug 24 '10 at 8:11
show 16 more comments

R:

cat("hello\n", file="fileio.txt")
cat("world\n", file="fileio.txt", append=TRUE)
line2 = readLines("fileio.txt", n=2)[2]
cat(line2)
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add comment

PHP

<?php

$filePath = "fileio.txt";

file_put_contents($filePath, "hello");
file_put_contents($filePath, "\nworld", FILE_APPEND);

$lines = file($filePath);

echo $lines[1];

// closing PHP tags are bad practice in PHP-only files, don't use them
share
20  
Alternatively, you could take the C implementation and add dollar signs. –  Kendall Hopkins Aug 22 '10 at 5:17
6  
Just in case anybody is curious, the reason he left off the closing tag is because if you include it, and leave any trailing white space, you risk getting a 'headers already sent' error. –  Bill H Aug 24 '10 at 2:40
show 4 more comments

Java

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

class Test {
  public static void  main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    String path = "fileio.txt";
    File file = new File(path);

    //Creates New File...
    try (FileOutputStream fout = new FileOutputStream(file)) {
      fout.write("hello\n".getBytes());
    }

    //Appends To New File...
    try (FileOutputStream fout2 = new FileOutputStream(file,true)) {
      fout2.write("world\n".getBytes());
    }

    //Reading the File...
    try (BufferedReader fin = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file))) {
      fin.readLine();
      System.out.println(fin.readLine());
    }       
  }
}
share
36  
@Brock: These days Java is not slow. Just verbose, but not slow. Please don't make such comments; hurts us JVM people. :'| –  missingfaktor Aug 21 '10 at 17:37
9  
Whoever said Java is slow is either a blind Java hater or lives under a rock. Java can be as fast as, if not faster than C, with platform independence to boot. –  NullUserException Aug 21 '10 at 18:00
4  
@Missing Faktor: And so? –  Jerry Coffin Aug 21 '10 at 18:58
19  
execution speed is the most retarded form of pissing contests programmers have. It is always about choosing the right tool for the job, choosing a random metric like execution speed and assigning heaps of importance to it is just silly, especially since execution speed isn't horribly important for the vast majority of tasks, as long as it is fast enough (which java is for almost everything) –  Matt Briggs Aug 21 '10 at 21:25
11  
"hardwiring is faster than machine code", "machine code is faster than asm", "asm is faster than C", "C is faster than Java", "blah blah blah"... Do you even have one clue how much indirection is already between machine code and CPU? microcode, predictive optimizer, instruction/data caches, decoder, etc, not to mention nondeterminism caused by dynamic allocation in C/asm. Java and other safe languages are just one more small step of indirection, it's no big deal. You can either stay in your primitive form forever or evolve with us. –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Aug 22 '10 at 0:36
show 19 more comments

C++

#include <limits>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::fstream file( "fileio.txt",
        std::ios::in | std::ios::out | std::ios::trunc  );
    file.exceptions( std::ios::failbit );   

    file << "hello\n" // << std::endl, not \n, if writing includes flushing
         << "world\n";

    file.seekg( 0 )
        .ignore( std::numeric_limits< std::streamsize >::max(), '\n' );
    std::string input_string;
    std::getline( file, input_string );

    std::cout << input_string << '\n';
}

or somewhat less pedantically,

#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    fstream file( "fileio.txt", ios::in | ios::out | ios::trunc  );
    file.exceptions( ios::failbit );   

    file << "hello" << endl
         << "world" << endl;

    file.seekg( 0 ).ignore( 10000, '\n' );
    string input_string;
    getline( file, input_string );

    cout << input_string << endl;
}
share
1  
Great! Thanks for contributing +1 –  Brock Woolf Aug 21 '10 at 19:30
14  
I forgot how ugly c++'s syntax can be. –  Toad Aug 21 '10 at 20:55
8  
@Hans: Would you like to clarify that? Personally, I think I/O belongs in a library rather than in the language, and all the languages I program in do it that way (C, C++, Java, Python, etc.) –  Chinmay Kanchi Aug 22 '10 at 14:02
2  
Now I know why Linus says C++ is ugly. (no offense) –  kizzx2 Aug 23 '10 at 17:03
show 6 more comments

Go

package main

import (
  "os"
  "bufio"
  "log"
)

func main() {
  file, err := os.Open("fileio.txt", os.O_RDWR | os.O_CREATE, 0666)
  if err != nil {
    log.Exit(err)
  }
  defer file.Close()

  _, err = file.Write([]byte("hello\n"))
  if err != nil {
    log.Exit(err)
  }

  _, err = file.Write([]byte("world\n"))
  if err != nil {
    log.Exit(err)
  }

  // seek to the beginning 
  _, err = file.Seek(0,0)
  if err != nil {
    log.Exit(err)
  }

  bfile := bufio.NewReader(file)
  _, err = bfile.ReadBytes('\n')
  if err != nil {
    log.Exit(err)
  }

  line, err := bfile.ReadBytes('\n')
  if err != nil {
    log.Exit(err)
  }

  os.Stdout.Write(line)
}
share
23  
This language should be renamed "type" –  Aiden Bell Aug 22 '10 at 19:52
1  
Or maybe it should be renamed "Stop" –  xagyg Aug 24 '10 at 1:56
16  
It's rather amazing that given 30 years of evolution and language design, they've still managed to invent a new language that's as hard to write error-checking code in as C. Even Java's less verbose! –  DK. Aug 24 '10 at 9:02
5  
Wow... Go seems so much Fail with this example –  Alessandro Stamatto Aug 24 '10 at 17:24
2  
Go: there is no try –  CyberShadow Aug 28 '10 at 13:18
show 3 more comments

Erlang

Probably not the most idiomatic Erlang, but:

#!/usr/bin/env escript

main(_Args) ->
  Filename = "fileio.txt",
  ok = file:write_file(Filename, "hello\n", [write]),
  ok = file:write_file(Filename, "world\n", [append]),
  {ok, File} = file:open(Filename, [read]),
  {ok, _FirstLine} = file:read_line(File),
  {ok, SecondLine} = file:read_line(File),
  ok = file:close(File),
  io:format(SecondLine).
share
1  
Erlang rocks... –  T.K. Aug 22 '10 at 16:51
show 2 more comments

Emacs Lisp

Despite what some people say Emacs is mainly a text editor [1]. So while Emacs Lisp can be used to solve all kinds of problems it is optimized towards the needs of a text editor. Since text editors (obviously) have quite specific needs when it comes to how files are handled this affects what file related functionality Emacs Lisp offers.

Basically this means that Emacs Lisp does not offer functions to open a file as a stream, and read it part by part. Likewise you can't append to a file without loading the whole file first. Instead the file is completely [2] read into a buffer [3], edited and then saved to a file again.

For must tasks you would use Emacs Lisp for this is suitable and if you want to do something that does not involve editing the same functions can be used.

If you want to append to a file over and over again this comes with a huge overhead, but it is possible as demonstrated here. In practice you normally finish making changes to a buffer whether manually or programmatically before writing to a file (just combine the first two s-expressions in the example below).

(with-temp-file "file"
  (insert "hello\n"))

(with-temp-file "file"
  (insert-file-contents "file")
  (goto-char (point-max))
  (insert "world\n"))

(with-temp-buffer
  (insert-file-contents "file")
  (next-line)
  (message "%s" (buffer-substring (point) (line-end-position))))

[1] At least I would not go as far as calling it an OS; an alternative UI yes, an OS no.

[2] You can load only parts of a file, but this can only be specified byte-wise.

[3] A buffer is both a datatype in someways similar to a string as well as the "thing you see while editing a file". While editing a buffer is displayed in a window but buffers do not necessarily have to be visible to the user.

Edit: If you want to see the text being inserted into the buffer you obviously have to make it visible, and sleep between actions. Because Emacs normally only redisplays the screen when waiting for user input (and sleeping ain't the same as waiting for input) you also have to force redisplay. This is necessary in this example (use it in place of the second sexp); in practice I never had to use `redisplay' even once - so yes, this is ugly but ...

(with-current-buffer (generate-new-buffer "*demo*")
  (pop-to-buffer (current-buffer))
  (redisplay)
  (sleep-for 1)
  (insert-file-contents "file")
  (redisplay)
  (sleep-for 1)
  (goto-char (point-max))
  (redisplay)
  (sleep-for 1)
  (insert "world\n")
  (redisplay)
  (sleep-for 1)
  (write-file "file"))
share
1  
nice thanks. Is it possible to enhance this so I actually see a 'ghost' opening the file and typing to it, like a macro of some sort? –  zedoo Aug 22 '10 at 8:17
show 2 more comments

Windows Batch Files - Version #2

@echo off
echo hello > fileio.txt
echo world  >> fileio.txt
set /P answer=Insert: 
echo %answer%  >> fileio.txt
for /f "skip=1 tokens=*" %%A in (fileio.txt) do echo %%A

To explain that last horrible looking for loop, it assumes that there is only hello (newline) world in the file. So it just skips the first line and echos only the second.

Changelog

  • #2 - Opps, must of misread the requirements or they changed on me. Now reads last line from file
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show 3 more comments

Scala:

Using standard library:

val path = "fileio.txt"
val fout = new FileWriter(path)
fout write "hello\n"
fout.close()
val fout0 = new FileWriter(path, true)
fout0 write "world\n"
fout0.close() 
val str = Source.fromFile(path).getLines.toSeq(1)
println(str)

Using Josh Suereth's Scala-ARM Library:

val path = "fileio.txt"
for(fout <- managed(new FileWriter(path))) 
  fout write "hello\n"
for(fout <- managed(new FileWriter(path, true))) 
  fout write "world\n"
val str = Source.fromFile(path).getLines.toSeq(1)
println(str)      


Since many people have used the same file descriptor to write the two strings, I'm also including that way in my answer.

Using standard library:

val path = "fileio.txt"
val fout = new FileWriter(path)
fout write "hello\n"
fout write "world\n"
fout.close()
val str = Source.fromFile(path).getLines.toSeq(1)
println(str)

Using Josh Suereth's Scala-ARM Library:

val path = "fileio.txt"
for(fout <- managed(new FileWriter(path))){
  fout write "hello\n"
  fout write "world\n"
}
val str = Source.fromFile(path).getLines.toSeq(1)
println(str)
share
2  
@Radtoo: Had to show the append operation. That's why I did it this way. –  missingfaktor Aug 22 '10 at 7:53
show 7 more comments

Groovy

new File("fileio.txt").with { 
    write  "hello\n"
    append "world\n"   
    println secondLine = readLines()[1]
}
share
3  
You are cheating on the "world\n" part. It's not appending, it is just writing to the same file descriptor. –  OTZ Aug 22 '10 at 9:10
show 2 more comments

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