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This has to be a common question that all programmers have from time to time. How do I read a line from a text file? Then the next question is always how do i write it back.

Of course most of you use a high level framework in day to day programming (which are fine to use in answers) but sometimes it's nice to know how to do it at a low level too.

I myself know how to do it in C, C++ and Objective-C, but it sure would be handy to see how it's done in all of the popular languages, if only to help us make a better decision about what language to do our file io in. In particular I think it would be interesting to see how its done in the string manipulation languages, like: python, ruby and of course perl.

So I figure here we can create a community resource that we can all star to our profiles and refer to when we need to do file I/O in some new language. Not to mention the exposure we will all get to languages that we don't deal with on a day to day basis.

This is how you need to answer:

  1. Create a new text file called "fileio.txt"
  2. Write the first line "hello" to the text file.
  3. Append the second line "world" to the text file.
  4. Read the second line "world" into an input string.
  5. Print the input string to the console.

Clarification:

  • You should show how to do this in one programming language per answer only.
  • Assume that the text file doesn't exist beforehand
  • You don't need to reopen the text file after writing the first line

No particular limit on the language. C, C++, C#, Java, Objective-C are all great.

If you know how to do it in Prolog, Haskell, Fortran, Lisp, or Basic then please go right ahead =)

Votes:

Vote up answers which have good naming conventions, and are easy to understand.

share

locked by Robert Harvey Oct 5 '11 at 5:40

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

closed as not a real question by Bill the Lizard Aug 23 '10 at 1:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
The problem with this is that it won't show up in searches for a specific language as it's not, nor can it be, tagged with every language. –  ChrisF Aug 21 '10 at 17:50
21  
I don't understand why this question is closed. Isn't the purpose of this site to help people find information? If someone knows how to do something (like IO) in C, and wants to learn how to do the same thing in Python, this could help them by allowing them to see both side by side. –  Slapout Aug 21 '10 at 18:34
18  
I also don't understand why this is closed. It seems like it's just because it doesn't include the words "...in the least amount of characters..." which is pretty silly. Code golf is a fun exercise. But is it really useful to make all the rosetta-stone questions have obfuscated, tiny code in all the answers? –  spencer nelson Aug 21 '10 at 18:38
12  
I don't understand how this is fits a Q&A site: at least with code golf, there's a somewhat objective standard by which to vote on answers: the shortest or most clever answer gets the most votes. With this: what is it, how many people like Haskell? Questions like this are like trying to shoehorn every possible type of content into a system that's designed for only one. What's wrong with the rest of the internet for handling this? –  user113292 Aug 21 '10 at 21:40
11  
Why this doesn't work well. No information about the pros and cons of each approach (what languages support only one way?). No discussion of the trade offs and deep issues in each language. Limited scope which implies that the need for a bajiliion separate "in Every Language" questions. And most of all there is no community moderation of the quality of each answer. Why do I say no moderation when people are voting on them? Because there is supposed to be only one answer for each language, and people wont read enough answers to see multiple alternatives in their field. –  dmckee Aug 21 '10 at 21:44

80 Answers 80

Rebol []

write/lines %fileio.txt "hello"
write/lines/append %fileio.txt "world"
print last read/lines %fileio.txt
share

For examples of how to do this sort of thing in many languages (61!) try the page on File I/O at Rosetta Code. To be fair, it doesn't appear to answer exactly what you're asking – it's dealing with whole-file I/O – but it's pretty close and covers a wider range than this question is otherwise likely to attract as answers.

share
8  
Are you sure that you do not mean 61, and not 61! ? –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 21 '10 at 17:13
34  
Just for the record - 61! = 5075802138772247988008568121766252272260045289880360030994059394809856 00000000000000 –  belisarius Aug 21 '10 at 17:39
17  
@Belisarius: Don't you mean - 61! = - 50758… –  Potatoswatter Aug 21 '10 at 19:55
7  
@belisarius Thank you so much for shifting the block of zeros one to the right - makes the whole number suddenly perfectly readable. –  Dave O. Aug 22 '10 at 0:52

Delphi

Delphi, the standard, low-level way (that is, no TStringList and other toys):

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

var
  f: Text;
  fn: string;
  ln: string;

begin

  fn := ExtractFilePath(ParamStr(0)) + 'fileio.txt';

  // Create a new file
  FileMode := fmOpenWrite;
  AssignFile(f, fn);
  try
    Rewrite(f);
    Writeln(f, 'hello');
    Writeln(f, 'world');
  finally
    CloseFile(f);
  end;

  // Read from the file
  FileMode := fmOpenRead;
  AssignFile(f, fn);
  try
    Reset(f);
    Readln(f, ln);
    Readln(f, ln);
    Writeln(ln);
  finally
    CloseFile(f);
  end;

end.

Because Delphi is a native Win32 compiler, you can also use the Windows API to handle all I/O operations:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Windows;

var
  f: HFILE;
  fn: string;
  lns: AnsiString;
  fsize, amt, i: cardinal;
  AfterLine1: boolean;

const
  data = AnsiString('hello'#13#10'world');

begin

  fn := ExtractFilePath(ParamStr(0)) + 'fileio.txt';

  f := CreateFile(PChar(fn), GENERIC_WRITE, 0, nil, CREATE_ALWAYS, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, 0);
  try
    WriteFile(f, data, length(data), amt, nil);
  finally
    CloseHandle(f);
  end;

  f := CreateFile(PChar(fn), GENERIC_READ, 0, nil, OPEN_ALWAYS, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, 0);
  try
    fsize := GetFileSize(f, nil);
    SetLength(lns, fsize);
    ReadFile(f, lns[1], fsize, amt, nil);
    for i := 1 to fsize do
      case lns[i] of
        #10: AfterLine1 := true;
      else
        if AfterLine1 then
          Write(lns[i]);
      end;
  finally
    CloseHandle(f);
  end;


end.

And, for completeness, I include the high-level approach, even though I never use it myself:

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Classes;

var
  fn: string;

begin

  fn := ExtractFilePath(ParamStr(0)) + 'fileio.txt';

  with TStringList.Create do
    try
      Add('hello');
      Add('world');
      SaveToFile(fn);
    finally
      Free;
    end;

  with TStringList.Create do
    try
      LoadFromFile(fn);
      Writeln(Strings[1]);
    finally
      Free;
    end;

end.
share
9  
I think you pretty much scared everyone away from Delphi. –  kirk.burleson Aug 22 '10 at 14:25
1  
Then maybe it's time to move on to the 21st century. Use a Stream, not File/Text –  Henk Holterman Aug 23 '10 at 21:50
2  
@Henk Holterman: Why abandon a perfectly working system? The low-level approach is fast (as fast as it gets), very easy to use, and completely unlimited since it gives you full control. Maybe I should add that I read/write binary files more often than text files, and when it comes to binary files, there are not as many alternatives to the low-level approach. Hence it feels natural for me always to use it, even for text-files. But still: why abandon a method that works perfectly? I know that some people are afraid of low-level, manual, stuff, but I am not. –  Andreas Rejbrand Aug 24 '10 at 7:39
1  
@Henk Holterman: "Then maybe it's time to move on to the 21st century" newer/shiner doesn't mean "better". –  SigTerm Aug 25 '10 at 15:57
1  
@Andreas: Then why aren't you doing assembler?? Honestly, I know little of Delphi and my Pascal is pretty rotten, but from what I can see I'd prefer the last piece of code to be dropped into my lap when you're leaving the company. –  sbi Sep 19 '10 at 13:31

ActionScript 3.0

Using Adobe AIR libraries:

import flash.filesystem.File;
import flash.filesystem.FileMode;
import flash.filesystem.FileStream;

public class fileio
{
    public static function doFileIO():void
    {
        var file:File = File.applicationStorageDirectory.resolvePath("fileio.txt");
        var stream:FileStream = new FileStream();
        stream.open(file, FileMode.WRITE);
        stream.writeUTFBytes("hello");
        stream.writeUTFBytes("\nworld");
        stream.close();

        stream.open(file, FileMode.READ);
        var content:String = stream.readUTFBytes(stream.bytesAvailable);
        stream.close();
        var input:String = content.split("\n")[1];
        trace(input);
    }
}

AIR applications cannot write into their directory due to security reasons, so it uses application storage directory.

share

Factor

For more information (and to download the latest release):

http://www.factorcode.org.

USING: io io.encodings.utf8 io.files ;

"fileio.txt" utf8
[ [ "hello" print ] with-file-writer ]
[ [ "world" print ] with-file-appender ]
[ file-lines last print ] 2tri
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Prolog

% read_line_to_codes is defined in YAP library already.
% Uncomment the next line and remove the makeshift replacement definition to use it.
% use_module(library(readutil)).

readcodes(Stream,[]) :- peek_char(Stream,'\n'),get_char(Stream,'\n');peek_char(Stream,end_of_file).
readcodes(Stream,[First|Rest]) :- get_code(Stream,First),readcodes(Stream,Rest).

read_line_to_codes(Stream,Line) :- readcodes(Stream,Line),!.

:- open('fileio.txt',write,Stream),write(Stream,'hello\n'),close(Stream).
:- open('fileio.txt',append,Stream),write(Stream,'world'),close(Stream).

secondline(L) :- open('fileio.txt',read,Stream),read_line_to_codes(Stream,_),read_line_to_codes(Stream,L),close(Stream).
:- secondline(L),format('~s\n',[L]).
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Perl 6

use v6;

my $path = 'fileio.txt';

# Open $path for writing.
given open($path, :w) {
    .say('hello'); # Print the line "hello\n" to it.
    .close; # Close the file.
}

# Open the file for appending.
given open($path, :a) {
    .say('world'); # Append the line "world\n" to it.
    .close;
}

my $line = lines($path)[1]; # Get the second line. lines returns a lazy iterator.
say $line; # Perl 6 filehandles autochomp, so we use say to add a newline.

EDIT: here's an alternate solution with a small helper function to avoid the need to explicitly close the file.

use v6;

sub with-file($path, *&cb, *%adverbs) {
    given open($path, |%adverbs) {
        .&cb;
        .close;
    }
}

my $path = 'fileio.txt';

# Open $path for writing.
with-file $path, :w, {
    .say('hello'); # Print the line "hello\n" to it.
};

# Open the file for appending.
with-file $path, :a, {
    .say('world'); # Append the line "world\n" to it.
};

my $line = lines($path)[1]; # Get the second line. lines returns a lazy iterator.
say $line; # Perl 6 filehandles autochomp, so we use say to add a newline.
share
6  
Perl actually makes me sad. No language ever needs a keyword 'given'. What next, 'beholdeth' or 'insomuchas' –  Aiden Bell Aug 22 '10 at 20:00
4  
@Aiden: given in Perl 6 is similar to Clojure's doto macro. It lets you avoid repeating the name of the object on which to invoke methods. –  missingfaktor Aug 23 '10 at 7:46
1  
@jplindstrom: The .close is necessary. Perl 6 doesn't mandate reference counting GC, so there's no real way to guarantee timely destruction of objects, so even if the file-handle's DESTROY closed the file, it wouldn't be closed until the next GC run after it falls out of scope. Ideally, there could be a with-file function such that "with-file $path, :w, { .say('hello') }", and the file-handle would automatically be closed after executing the block. I've edited my original answer to add an example of how that would look. –  ekiru Aug 30 '10 at 6:35

Lua

io.open( 'TestIO.txt', 'w' ):write( 'hello' ):write( '\n', 'world' ):close()
aLine = io.open( 'TestIO.txt', 'r' ):read( '*a' ):match( '%C*%c*(.*)' )
print( aLine )
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*NIX shell (bash or sh)

#!/bin/bash

echo 'hello' > fileio.txt
echo 'world' >> fileio.txt

myvar=`tail -n 1 fileio.txt`
echo $myvar
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ANSI C (POSIX API)

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#include <stdio.h> /* For error reporting */

#define BUFFER_SIZE 6

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int fd;
    const char HELLO[] = "hello\n";
    const char WORLD[] = "world\n";

    if ((fd = open ("fileio.txt", O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, S_IRWXU)) < 0) {
        perror ("open");
        return 1;
    }

    if (write (fd, HELLO, sizeof (HELLO)) < 0) {
        perror ("write");
        return 1;
    }

    if (write (fd, WORLD, sizeof (WORLD)) < 0) {
        perror ("write(2)");
        return 1;
    }

    /* Rewind file */
    lseek (fd, 0, SEEK_SET);

    /* Read whole file */
    int bytes_read;
    do {
        char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];

        bytes_read = read (fd, buffer, BUFFER_SIZE);
        write (0, buffer, bytes_read);
    } while (bytes_read > 0);


    if (close (fd) != 0) {
        perror ("close");
        return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}
share

Io

File with("fileio.txt") open write("hello\n") write("world\n") \
    rewind readLines second println

Is this the shortest of the solutions?

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Tcl

set f [open fileio.txt w+]

puts $f hello    
puts $f world

seek $f 0

puts [lindex [split [read $f] \n] 1]

close $f
share
1  
thanks for contributing –  Brock Woolf Aug 21 '10 at 19:59

Python 2


Example 1:

with open('fileio.txt', 'a') as f:
    f.write('hello')
    f.write('\nworld')
with open('fileio.txt') as f:
    s = f.readlines()[1]
    print s

Example 2 - without context managers:

f = open('fileio.txt', 'a')
f.write('hello')
f.write('\nworld')
f.close()
f = open('fileio.txt')
s = f.readlines()[1]
f.close()
print s
share
4  
Does this fully follow the rules? This appends both hello and world to the file. The rules said that hello must be written to the file and world should be appended. Unless this is accepted... (I'm not too sure of what the OP meant). –  vlad003 Aug 21 '10 at 23:25
2  
Instead of f.readlines()[1] which will read the entire file, you could use f.next(); s = f.next() which will read only the first two lines. Or use itertools.islice(f, 1,2)[0] –  Dave Kirby Aug 22 '10 at 10:23

Visual Basic 6.0

open "fileio.txt" for output as #1
write #1, "hello"
close #1

open "fileio.txt" for append as #1
write #1, "world"
close #1

open "fileio.txt" for input as #1
dim strn as string
input #1, strn
input #1, strn
msgbox(strn)
close #1
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MUMPS (not obfuscated)

For historical reasons related to disk space and memory usage ca. 1969, MUMPS allows you to truncate commands to one (or sometimes two) characters, which is why Clayton's example looked so "weird" (although I could read it easily enough). Here's more about what's going on with this MUMPS program.

FileIo ; Define a "label" identifying this piece of code (not a function here).
 ; MUMPS has only process-specific variable scope, so stack local
 ; variables with the 'New' command.
 New File, Line1, Line2
 Set File="FILEIO.TXT"

 ; MUMPS has a concept of a "currently open" device, which "Read" and "Write"
 ; commands use.  Identify a device with the Open command and switch to the
 ; device with the "Use" command.  Get rid of the device with the "Close"
 ; command.

 ; Another funny thing here is the "postconditional expression," which in this
 ; case is "WNS".  In this case we pass arguments to the Open command.  The
 ; exact meaning is implementation-specific but if I had to guess, these
 ; arguments have to do with opening the file for writing, using a newline
 ; character as a delimiter, etc.
 Open File:"WNS" Use File Write "hello" Close File
 Open File:"WAS" Use File Write !,"world" Close File ; ! = new line

 ; Here the "Read" command executes twice on the file, reading two lines into
 ; the variables "Line1" and "Line2".  The Read command is probably aware of the
 ; line-oriented nature of the file because of the "RS" postconditional.
 Open File:"RS" Use File Read Line1,Line2 Close File Write Line2,!
 Quit
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FORTRAN

I've been hating FORTRAN recently, so here goes:

      PROGRAM FILEIO
C     WRITES TWO LINES TO A TEXT FILE AND THEN RETRIEVES THE SECOND OF
C     THEM
      CHARACTER*5 STRIN
      OPEN(UNIT=1, FILE='FILEIO.TXT')
      WRITE(1,100) 'HELLO'
      WRITE (1,100) 'WORLD'
      CLOSE(1)
C
      OPEN(UNIT=2, FILE='FILEIO.TXT')
      READ(2,100) STRIN
      READ(2,100) STRIN
      WRITE(*,*) STRIN
 100  FORMAT(A5)
      STOP
      END  

Edit by ldigas: I on the other hand rather like it
(sorry for messing with your answer; I didn't feel like starting another Fortran post)

character(10) :: line
open(1,file='fileio.txt',status='replace')
write(1,'("hello"/"world")'); rewind(1);
read(1,'(/a)')line; write(*,'(a)')line
end

(this is a little newer Fortran variant ... only some 15-20 years old ;-)

share

D with Tango

import tango.text.Util, tango.io.Stdout, tango.io.device.File;

void main()
{
    scope file = new File ("fileio.txt", File.ReadWriteCreate);
    file.write ("hello\n");
    file.write ("world\n");
    auto line = splitLines (file.rewind.text())[1];
    stdout(line).nl;
}

Condensed version:

void main()
{
        with (new File ("fileio.txt", File.ReadWriteCreate))
              stdout (lineOf (put("hello\n").put("world\n").rewind.text(), 1)).nl;    
}
share

C# with Streams

A good C# example was already previously provided, but I felt including how to do file I/O on a line by line basis with streams would be helpful as well.

        string path = @"fileio.txt";

        //creating file and writing to it
        using (StreamWriter writer = File.CreateText(path))
        {
            writer.WriteLine("Hello");
        }

        //appending to existing file
        using (StreamWriter writer = File.AppendText(path))
        {
            writer.WriteLine("World");
        }

        //reading file
        using(StreamReader reader = File.OpenText(path))
        {
            int lineNum = 0;
            string line = null;

            while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)//read until eof
            {
                if (++lineNum == 2)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(line);
                }
            }
        }
share
3  
Is there a reason you're doing this... StreamWriter writer = File.CreateText(path); writer.WriteLine("Hello"); writer.Close(); Instead of the more idiomatic this... using(StreamWriter writer = File.CreateText(path)) writer.WriteLine("Hello"); The using statement should be used to manage disposable resources rather than manually disposing which can lead to leaks. –  Ramon Leon Aug 24 '10 at 2:51

Modern Perl

use 5.012;
use warnings;
use autodie;

# 1 & 2 - create and write line to file
open my $new, '>', 'fileio.txt';
say {$new} 'hello';
close $new;

# 3 - open file to append line 
open my $append, '>>', 'fileio.txt';
say {$append} 'world';
close $append;

# 4 - read in second line to input string
my $line = do {
    open my $read, '<', 'fileio.txt';
    <$read>;    # equivalent to: readline $read
    <$read>;    # last value expression gets returned from do{}
};

print $line;   # 5 - print input string!

Above is a basic example of using open in Modern Perl (ie. three arg open, lexical filehandles, autodie and say/print best practise).

However it is really unnecessary to pollute the namespace with $new and $append lexical variables (which hold the filehandle). So for points 1-3 I would probably feel happier doing:

{ 
    open my $fh, '>', 'fileio.txt';
    say {$fh} 'hello';
}

{ 
    open my $fh, '>>', 'fileio.txt';
    say {$fh} 'world';
}

or:

use IO::File;   # core module

IO::File->new( 'fileio.txt', 'w' )->print( "hello\n" );
IO::File->new( 'fileio.txt', 'a' )->print( "world\n" );


Update re: clarification: You don't need to reopen the text file after writing the first line

And no mention whether you need to re-open file for reading back second line thus it can all be done like so:

my $line = do {
    open my $fh, '+>', 'fileio.txt';
    say {$fh} $_ for qw/hello world/;  # or just: say {$fh} "hello\nworld" :)
    seek $fh, 0, 0;                    # rewind to top of file
    (<$fh>)[1];                        # no need to be lazy with just 2 recs!
};

print $line;

/I3az/

share

JScript (Windows Script Host)

var fileName = "fileio.txt";
var ForReading = 1;
var ForAppending = 8;

var fso = new ActiveXObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

// Create a file and write to it
var file = fso.CreateTextFile(fileName, true /* overwrite if exists */);
file.WriteLine("hello");
file.Close();

// Append to the file
file = fso.OpenTextFile(fileName, ForAppending);
file.WriteLine("world");
file.Close();

// Read from the file
file = fso.OpenTextFile(fileName, ForReading);
file.SkipLine();
var str = file.ReadLine();
file.Close();
WScript.Echo(str);
share
2  
VBScript Version isn't all so different... –  st0le Aug 21 '10 at 17:13
3  
@st0le: Yes; I just like JScript better. –  Helen Aug 21 '10 at 17:20

Pascal

 Program pascalIO;
    Var FName, TFile  : String[15];
        UserFile: Text; 
    Begin
     FName := 'fileio.txt';
     Assign(UserFile, FName);  
     Rewrite(UserFile);  
     Writeln(UserFile,'hello');
     Writeln(UserFile,'world');
     Close(UserFile);

     Assign(UserFile, FName);
     Reset(UserFile);
     Readln(UserFile,TFile);
     Readln(UserFile,TFile);
     Writeln( TFile);


     Close(UserFile);
    End.
share
1  
Looks good. Thanks for the contribution. –  Brock Woolf Aug 21 '10 at 17:42
1  
I guess TFile should be a string, too. And you don't need Txt. –  devio Aug 21 '10 at 19:11
3  
Beautiful :) I don't know why, but I'm fond of this syntax. Perhaps because it reminds me of high school :) –  Danita Aug 21 '10 at 21:40

Io

f := File with("fileio.txt")
f open
f write("hello")
f close

f openForAppending
f write("\nworld")
f close

f openForReading
secondLine := f readLines at(1)
f close
write(secondLine)
share
4  
The poetic irony! –  Thomas Eding Aug 21 '10 at 17:07
8  
Actually, it's Io, with uppercase i, not Lo. :) –  Ionuț G. Stan Aug 21 '10 at 17:37
2  
@strager: Correct. –  Brock Woolf Aug 22 '10 at 9:00
2  
@otz, Can't distinguish between ♯ and #. –  strager Aug 22 '10 at 9:24
1  
@otz Точно? ("Really?" in Russian. Yes, I do use multibyte characters in normal conditions.) –  whitequark Aug 22 '10 at 12:38

J

f =: 'fileio.txt'
('hello', LF) 1!:2 < f
('world', LF) 1!:3 < f
; 1 { < ;. _2 (1!:1  < f)

The last line reads the file (1!:1 < f), cuts it into lines (< ;. _2), gets the second element (1 {). Then the Monadic ; is used to unbox the element.

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Python

open('fileio.txt', 'w').write('hello\n')
open('fileio.txt', 'a').write('world\n')
with open('fileio.txt', 'r') as f:
  print f.readline() and f.readline(),
share

PLT Racket

#lang racket
(call-with-output-file "fileio.txt"
                       #:exists 'truncate
                       (lambda (out)
                            (fprintf out "hello\n" )))
(call-with-output-file "fileio.txt"
                       #:exists 'append
                       (lambda (out)
                            (fprintf out "world\n" )))
(call-with-input-file "fileio.txt"
                      (lambda (in)
                            (read-line in)
                            (display (read-line in))))
share

JavaScript - Narwhal on Node

var FS = require("narwhal/fs");
FS.open("fileio.txt", "w")
    .print("hello")
    .print("world")
    .close()

var stream = FS.open("fileio.txt", "r");
stream.next();
print(stream.next());
stream.close();

This is another particular JavaScript embedding.

http://narwhaljs.org

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Clojure

Because you want to read line by line, you can't use slurp, so

(use 'clojure.java.io)

And then in traditional lisp style:

(let [f "hello.txt"]
  (spit f "hello\n") 
  (spit f "world\n" :append true)
  (print (second (line-seq (reader f)))))

or, bereft of beloved brackets:

(doto "hello.txt"
  (spit "hello\n")
  (spit "world\n" :append true)
  (-> reader line-seq second print ))
share

Ioke

path = "fileio.txt"

FileSystem withOpenFile(path, fn(f,
    f println("hello"))
)
FileSystem withOpenFile(path, fn(f,
    f println("world"))
)
FileSystem readLines(path) [1] print
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AWK

(without command-line feedback)

BEGIN {
    print "hello" > "fileio.txt"
    print "world" > "fileio.txt"
    for ( i = 0; i < 2; i ++ )
        getline < "fileio.txt"
    fflush( "fileio.txt" );

    print $0
}
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K 3

f:`fileio.txt
f 0:/:(*a;a:$`hello`world)
`0:*1_0:f
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3  
Did you make this up? –  kirk.burleson Aug 22 '10 at 15:25

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