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Observe the following table model:

CREATE TABLE [site].[Permissions] (
    [ID]     INT REFERENCES [site].[Accounts]( [ID] ) NOT NULL,
    [Type]   SMALLINT NOT NULL, 
    [Value]  INT NULL
);

The site.Accounts->site.Permissions is a one-to-many relationship so 'ID' cannot be made a primary key due to the uniqueness that a PK imposes.

The rows are selected using a WHERE [ID] = ? clause, so adding a phoney IDENTITY column and making it the PK yields no benefit at the cost of additional disk space.

Its my understanding that the targeted platform - SQL Server (2008) - does not support composite PKs. These all add up to my question: If a Primary Key is not used, so something wrong? Or could something be more right?

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2  
This might be helpful reading: weblogs.sqlteam.com/jeffs/archive/2007/08/23/… –  Michael Haren Aug 22 '10 at 1:39
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your understanding is not correct, SQL Server does support composite primary keys!

The syntax to add one would be

ALTER TABLE  [site].[Permissions] 
ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Permissions PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (id,[Type])

Regarding the question in the comments "What is the benefit of placing a PK on the entire table?"

I'm not sure from your description though what the PK would need to be on. Is it all 3 columns or just 2 of them? If it's on id,[Type] then presumably you wouldn't want the possibility that the same id,[Type] combo could appear multiple times with conflicting values.

If it is on all 3 columns then to turn the question around why wouldn't you want a primary key?

If you are going to have a clustered index on your table you could just make that the primary key. If say you made a clustered index on the id column only SQL Server would add in uniqueifiers anyway to make it unique and your columns are so narrow (int,smallint,int) this just seems a pointless addition.

Additionally the query optimiser can use unique constraints to improve its query plans (though might not apply if the only queries on that table really are WHERE [ID] = ?) and it would be pretty wasteful to allow duplicates that you then have to both store and filter out with DISTINCT.

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Okay... Surprised I couldn't find anything on google. Either way, what is the benefit of placing a PK on the entire table? 1. Data integrity: Identical rows are forbidden... 2.? –  Kivin Aug 22 '10 at 1:39
    
Entity integrity. I'm not sure from your description though what the PK would need to be on. Is it all 3 columns or just 2 of them? If it's on id,[Type] then presumably you wouldn't want the possibility that the same id,[Type] combo could appear with 2 different values. If it is on all 3 columns then it would just be wasteful to allow duplicates that you then have to both store and filter out with DISTINCT. –  Martin Smith Aug 22 '10 at 1:41
1  
@Kivin: 2) Primary key generally means clustered index, which is better than a non-clustered one - especially considering how you will be searching the table. The clustered key doesn't have to be the primary key, but generally it is. –  OMG Ponies Aug 22 '10 at 1:42
    
@ Martin, you're right. When I sat down and read Michael Haren's link and went to work writing a PK, I realized that I only wanted the uniqueness on the first two columns. –  Kivin Aug 22 '10 at 1:59
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