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I'm learning queues from a book. I've got into a problem while learning circular queue. The author from which I'm learning uses the following piece of code to explain how an element is inserted in a circular queue.

#define MAX 100
char *p[MAX];
int spos = 0; // spos: holds the index of the **next free** storage location

int rpos = 0;// rpos: holds the index of the next item to retrieve

void qstore(char *q)
{
  /* The queue is full if either spos is one less than rpos
      or if spos is at the end of the queue array and rpos
      is at the beginning.
  */
  if(spos+1= =rpos || (spos+1==MAX && !rpos)) <-- /***Problem is here**. Is it even  
                                                    correct?*/
  {
     printf(''List Full\n");
     return;
  }
  p[spos] = q;
  spos++;

  if(spos==MAX) 
  spos = 0; /* loop back */
}

He further states that: The queue is full when the store index is one less than the retrieve index; otherwise, there is room in the queue for another event.

SO, acc. to the author, if spos (which holds the index of the next free storage location) is equal to 4 and rpos=5, then the queue is full. Isn't this incorrect? Because spos=3 means that the memory location at p[3] is empty.


So I decided to change the program.

#define MAX 100
char *p[MAX];
int spos = 0; // spos: holds the index of the **last allocated** storage location

int rpos = 0;// rpos: holds the index of the next item to retrieve

void qstore(char *q)
{
  /* The condition for queue full is same as the previous program*/

 /* The queue is full if either spos is one less than rpos
      or if spos is at the end of the queue array and rpos 
      is at the beginning.
  */

if((spos+1==rpos) || (spos+1==MAX && rpos==0)) // Also changed syntax of test condition.
 {
   printf("Queue Full\n");
 } 

spos++

if((spos+1==MAX) && (rpos!=0))
 {
   spos=0;
 }
else
{
  spos++;
}

 p[spos]=q;

}

Is my code correct?

share|improve this question
    
Could you perhaps say, which book / author this is your are citing from? –  Jens Gustedt Aug 22 '10 at 6:29
    
C: The Complete Reference, 4th by Ed Herbert Schildt –  Naruto Uzumaki Aug 22 '10 at 6:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The author's implementation is not wrong and is intentional, but you won't see it unless you think about/see the dequeue process. The problem is how do you determine if the queue when empty?

The queue is empty when spos == rpos. If you don't say the queue is full when spos+1 == rpos, but spos == rpos you have lost the ability to tell the difference between a full and empty queue.

You are correct however is noticing that you will leave one queue entry free. You queue will only hold 99 items and not 100. That "missing" is the price you pay for needing to distinguish between a full and empty circular queue without using any additional variables besides rpos, spos, and queue.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 exactly right –  Bill Forster Aug 22 '10 at 5:13
    
Thanks! So my code is wrong? –  Naruto Uzumaki Aug 22 '10 at 8:10
    
Yes your code is wrong. It increments spos twice so you'll only be using every other entry in p. –  shf301 Aug 22 '10 at 13:26
    
Oh! That's an unintentional mistake. I edited this code. There wasn't an else check before and when I added it later, I must've forgotten deleting the previous statement. If I delete that extra increment before the if-else block, will my code be correct? I guess not, I need to account for nulls perhaps, and I might have problem in finding a check for empty queue. –  Naruto Uzumaki Aug 22 '10 at 14:23
1  
One nice variation on the approach which avoids wasting a queue slot is to make the queue size be a power of two, and have the read/write indices wrap at a larger power of two. In that case, one can easily distinguish the queue-full and queue-empty cases without needing extra storage (unless the queue size would be 256 or 65,536 elements). In C, the easiest way to do this is to have the indices simply be unsigned integer types and let them wrap whenever they will. –  supercat Aug 24 '11 at 21:20

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