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Instead of writing the following non-thread safe method.

private static final Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
public void fun() {
    // Going to call mutable methods in calendar.
}

I change it to a thread safe version.

public void fun() {
    final Calendar calendar = Calendar.getInstance();
    // Going to call mutable methods in calendar.
}

Instead of creating a new instance each time even for a same thread, I did the improvement by

public void fun() {
    final Calendar calendar = getCalendar();
    // Going to call mutable methods in calendar.
}

/**
 * Returns thread safe calendar.
 * @return thread safe calendar
 */
public Calendar getCalendar() {
    return calendar.get();
}

private static final ThreadLocal <Calendar> calendar = new ThreadLocal <Calendar>() {
    @Override protected Calendar initialValue() {
        return Calendar.getInstance();
     }
 };

For my 3rd approach, is there any need to call the ThreadLocal.remove?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your only intent is to make it threadsafe, then there is indeed no need to do so. But when the threads are maintained by a threadpool and your intent is more to give each freshly released thread from a threadpool its own initial value, then you should do so.

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As @BalusC says, it depends on what you are concerned about.

I have a suspicion that your recycling of Calendar objects using a thread local may actually be costing more than you are saving by not calling Calendar.getInstance(). This has the smell of a premature micro-optimization.

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But, Joshua Bloch even suggest using ThreadLocal for SimpleDateFormat example. (I plan to use for Calendar, SimpleDateFormat and NumberFormat) - old.nabble.com/… –  Cheok Yan Cheng Aug 22 '10 at 8:03
    
But nothing! Rule #1 of optimization - profile you application first. –  Stephen C Aug 22 '10 at 8:14
    
@Yan Cheng Calendar should be a quite cheap object to construct. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Aug 22 '10 at 10:34

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