Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to understand what's happening in the example below (where a protected member is being accessed from outside the package through a subclass).

I know for classes outside the package, the subclass can see the protected member only through inheritance.

There are two packages: package1 and package2.

  1. package1: ProtectedClass.java

    package org.test.package1;
    
    public class ProtectedClass {
    
        protected void foo () {
            System.out.println("foo");
        }
    }
    
  2. package2: ExtendsprotectedClass.java

    package org.test.package2;
    
    import org.test.package1.ProtectedClass;
    
    public class ExtendsprotectedClass  extends ProtectedClass {
    
        public void boo() {
            foo(); // This works, 
                   // since protected method is visible through inheritance
        }
    
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            ExtendsprotectedClass epc = new ExtendsprotectedClass();
            epc.foo(); // Why is this working? 
                       // Since it is accessed through a reference,
                       // foo() should not be visible, right?
        }
    }
    
  3. package2: UsesExtendedClass.java

    package org.test.package2;
    
    public class UsesExtendedClass {
    
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            ExtendsprotectedClass epc = new ExtendsprotectedClass();
            epc.foo(); // CompilationError: 
                       // The method foo() from the type ProtectedClass
                       // is not visible
        }
    }
    

It is understood that the boo() method in ExtendsprotectedClass can access foo(), since protected members can be accessed through inheritance only.

My question is, why is the foo() method working fine when accessed through a reference in the main() method of ExtendsprotectedClass but will not work when accessed through the epc reference in UsesExtendedClass?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Code within the ExtendsprotectedClass class is allowed to access protected members of ProtectedClass via a reference of type ExtendsprotectedClass. From the JLS section 6.6.2:

A protected member or constructor of an object may be accessed from outside the package in which it is declared only by code that is responsible for the implementation of that object.

and

Let C be the class in which a protected member m is declared. Access is permitted only within the body of a subclass S of C. In addition, if Id denotes an instance field or instance method, then:

  • If the access is by a qualified name Q.Id, where Q is an ExpressionName, then the access is permitted if and only if the type of the expression Q is S or a subclass of S. [...]

UsesExtendedClass isn't reponsible for the implementation of ExtendsprotectedClass, hence the final call fails.

EDIT: The reasoning behind this is that protected access is designed to help subclasses implement the functionality they need, giving more access to the internals of the superclass than would normally be available. If that were available to all code, it would be pretty close to making the method public. Basically, the subclasses are trusted not to break encapsulation; they're given more capabilities within objects of their own type. The public API shouldn't expose those details, but the protected API can just for the purposes of giving subclasses more opportunities.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jon Thanks. I understand that class members of subclass can access protected members ( as indicated in boo() method ). But Was curious to know as to why it's allowed to access the protected member via a reference of the subclass, ONLY in subclass methods ? any rationale behind it ? –  JWhiz Aug 22 '10 at 8:26
    
@JWhiz: Editing... –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '10 at 8:39
1  
2) Works because because the protected method is accessed by a pointer of its own class. This should fail: <br> public static void ExtendsprotectedClass.main(String[] args){ ProtectedClass epc = new ExtendsprotectedClass(); //upcast <br> epc.foo(); // should be compilation error? <br> } –  Markus Kull Aug 22 '10 at 8:52
    
@Jon:Totally agree that protected access is designed to help subclasses implement the functionality they need. That's why i had added a snippet of code boo() calling foo().i.e subclass code can use the protected foo() or override foo() of the base class.understood. but what I'm still not getting is why is it allowed access directly through a reference ExtendsprotectedClass epc = new ExtendsprotectedClass();epc.foo();.It shouldn't had as in second case right?Any rationale on why is it allowing to access protected method foo() via a reference only in class implementing base class? –  JWhiz Aug 22 '10 at 8:55
    
@JWhiz: Because it means that code within that class is able to work instances of itself easily - for things like comparison, static factory methods etc. It can be a real pain to write an instance method just for the sake of being able to get at a particular member. Again, the code of the subclass should know what it's doing. –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '10 at 10:59
show 6 more comments

It is working in the first case because it is being called from the same class even the method is being accessed through a reference. You could even call a private method of ExtendsprotectedClass through a reference in the same main method.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. Now i see why its able to access it through reference. +1 for it. But , It should not be allowed to call private methods through an Object reference right ? Doesn't this violate the very purpose of making it private ? Any specific reason for allowing to do so ? –  JWhiz Aug 22 '10 at 10:04
1  
@JWhiz the java access modifiers work at class and not at instance level. Because of that a private method is private to the class and not an instance. If private worked on instances you would have to make more variables and methods public if two instances have to interact. This would break encapsulation by making the implementation visible outside of the class. –  josefx Aug 22 '10 at 16:10
add comment

I believe you've answered your own question; UsesExtendedClass does not inherit from ProtectedClass, and -- by definition -- "protected" members are accessible only in the class in which they are declared / defined or in a class that inherits from the one in which they are declared or defined.

share|improve this answer
2  
by definition -- "protected" members are accessible only in the class in which they are declared / defined. I don't quite agree with that as protected members are accessible from other classes within the same package without inheritance. –  JWhiz Aug 22 '10 at 8:22
add comment

take a look on this picture from : http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/accesscontrol.html

enter image description here

its clear that protected member of class can be accessed via subclass.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.