Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to know how many event handlers for an event?

I want a way to execute the following code:

// if (control.CheckedChanged.Handlers.Length == 0)
{
    control.CheckedChanged += (s, e) =>
    {
      // code;
    }
}

Note: this code is out side the control class.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't, because only the type that exposes the event has access to the actual delegate. From within the control, you could do something like that:

if (MyEvent!= null)
{
    EventHandler[] handlers = (EventHandler[])MyEvent.GetInvocationList();
    foreach(EventHandler handler in handlers)
    {
        ...
    }
}

Or, for what you're trying to do:

if (CheckedChanged == null)
{
    CheckedChanged += (s, e) =>
    {
      // code;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That code will always either throw a NullReferenceException or go into the if block... there's no such thing as a delegate instance with no actions. –  Jon Skeet Aug 22 '10 at 12:29
    
@Jon, good point... I'll fix it –  Thomas Levesque Aug 22 '10 at 12:30
    
This code works only if It wrote inside the class, but I'm talking about join an event to an event handler outside the class, so.. this solution didn't work for the second situation –  Homam Aug 22 '10 at 12:34
    
As I said, there is no way to do it from outside the class (unless you're willing to use reflection on private members, which is quite ugly...) –  Thomas Levesque Aug 22 '10 at 12:39
    
I'll add a flag property in the class "HasEventHandler" if there's no way. Thanks. –  Homam Aug 22 '10 at 12:40

My answer is more of a comment for Thomas Levesque, but I can't comment yet, so here goes nothing. I find this area of C# a little ugly, since there's a possibility to introduce race conditions - i.e. different threads may race and you may enter the if statement with CheckedChanged != null

if (CheckedChanged == null)
{
    CheckedChanged += (s, e) =>
    {
      // code;
    }
}

You should either lock this code, but in many cases you will find yourself writing code like this

//Invoke SomeEvent if there are any handlers  attached to it.
if(SomeEvent != null) SomeEvent(); 

But SomeEvent may be nulled in the process, so it would be safer to write something like this

SomeEVentHandler handler = SomeEvent;
if (handler != null) handler();

...just to be extra safe.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.