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I have a C# program that uses a production grammar to generate 3D models of trees and flowers and similar organic entities (see wikipedia entry for more info on L-Systems) - when I'm generating a large tree with leaves, I (expectedly) get exponential growth in the string that would go up to 100's of gigs if I'd let it (and I'd like to).

Constraints - I have to do this (sort of) in C# - the C++/native side is busy compiling and rendering the rather immense geometry that's produced.

So StringBuilder is right out --- even if it could handle it, I don't have enough memory!

I don't want to do a pure file based solution - waaaaaayyyyyyyy toooooooooooo sloooooooooooowwww!

I can't change the grammar - I realize I could compress the standard L-Systems notation, but it's a context sensitive grammar, so once you've got it working, you become positively superstitious about fiddling with it.

Things I've considered

Memory mapped files - I don't mind using P/Invoke to get to the native layer to support things, I just don't want to rewrite the whole production system in C++ - but I haven't found much in the way of handy libraries for C# to access this functionality

Low level mucking about with memory management/page faulting, etc - but hey, if I did that I might as well sell it as a product - makes the slow pure file based solution not look like such a bad idea

Anybody got any ideas here ? How do I effeciently traverse/manipulate/expand multigig strings produced by a production grammar ?

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You might elaborate a little bit on what kind of string operations you do. Just appending writes? Random read / write? Random read / write in a chunk at a time? With the size of the data you apparently need to store somethings on disk, but you want to keep a working set in RAM? How do you identify the working set? I assume a database is not a suitable for this kind of operations. –  Albin Sunnanbo Aug 22 '10 at 18:44
    
It's a production system - the entire string is processed, and recognized substrings are replaced with their new productions A database would be 'problematic' It's effectively a giant turing machine - I need to keep whats under the head in RAM, but otherwise can pull it on and off disk –  Mark Mullin Aug 23 '10 at 2:13
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At risk of stating the obvious, let me toss out one possibility: compression. These self-referencing structures are inherently compressible. Perhaps, rather than using substitution to explicitly replace a segment with an expanded one, you could use a representation that lets you simply reference the expansion, allowing that reference to be reused as needed. This seems to be the only alternative to having an app that uses up terabytes just to draw a single leaf. –  Steven Sudit Aug 23 '10 at 2:53
    
Mentioning compression is a good idea - the problem with using compression directly in substitution is that on each pass through the production system, previously substituted items get substituted again - plus a neural network is generating coefficients for things like length and angle -- I have been thinking of compression with respect to decompressing the 'active' part of the compression (what I'm currently substituting) but most references on compression treat the input as fixed before beginning the process –  Mark Mullin Aug 23 '10 at 10:57
    
Mark, you're quite right that the typical approach to compression involves the notion of a pre-existing plaintext. What I'm talking about here is something like the idea of using a trie data structure (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trie) as opposed to a dictionary. It's not just about passively compressing, but rather using an inherently more compact representation that encodes the redundancies implicitly. If you're at the 100G mark today, you're within an order of magnitude of bursting past the limits of affordable hard drives, so you might benefit from rethinking the solution. HTH –  Steven Sudit Aug 23 '10 at 16:45
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You're quite right that the typical approach to compression involves the notion of a pre-existing plaintext. What I'm talking about here is something like the idea of using a trie data structure as opposed to a dictionary. It's not just about passively compressing, but rather using an inherently more compact representation that encodes the redundancies implicitly. If you're at the 100G mark today, you're within an order of magnitude of bursting past the limits of affordable hard drives, so you might benefit from rethinking the solution.

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Please note that Daniel's answer about memory mapped files is complementary to mine. –  Steven Sudit Aug 24 '10 at 16:06
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If you can upgrade to .net 4.0 then then you can use memory mapped files without needing to P/Invoke.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997372.aspx

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Thanks! - am using .net 4, didn't know that –  Mark Mullin Aug 23 '10 at 2:14
    
If you're dealing with amounts of data in the 100G range, then -- like it or not -- you're dealing with memory mapping and paging. Since you're not willing to off-load the mess to a database, you might as well tackle this head-on at this level. –  Steven Sudit Aug 23 '10 at 2:49
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If this is only for your development machines then a "back to the future" solution might be a RAM Disk, aka RAM Drive.

A RAM disk or RAM drive is a block of RAM (primary storage or volatile memory) that a computer's software is treating as if the memory were a disk drive (secondary storage).

One product for example. Search for RAM Disk or RAM drive and you'll get a cornucopia of choices.

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100 GB won't fit in a RAM drive. –  Albin Sunnanbo Aug 22 '10 at 19:58
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Then have you come full circle? Paging Systems, whether liked or not, may be in your future. :-) –  JustBoo Aug 22 '10 at 20:27
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