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I'm following a tutorial. (Real World Haskell)

And I have one beginner question about head and tail called on empty lists: In GHCi it returns exception.

Intuitively I think I would say they both should return an empty list. Could you correct me ? Why not ? (as far as I remember in OzML left or right of an empty list returns nil)

I surely have not yet covered this topic in the tutorial, but isnt it a source of bugs (if providing no arguments)? I mean if ever passing to a function a list of arguments which may be optionnal, reading them with head may lead to a bug ?

I just know the GHCi behaviour, I don't know what happens when compiled.

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This is actually a special case of a more general problem with "partial functions". A "total" function will return a result for any arguments. A partial function is not total; some arguments will return bottom (i.e. an error or an endless loop). Work on total languages (where all functions are total) is proceeding, but don't hold your breath. –  Paul Johnson Aug 22 '10 at 19:54
    
I don't understand "is proceeding, but don't hold your breath" ? From what I undertand right now I tend to really prefer total functions over partial ones. –  Stephane Rolland Aug 22 '10 at 20:08
    
@Stephane Rolland: Don't wait for this languages to become reality ;) For most cases, the Maybe a type is the best choice for expressing computations that may return values.` –  Dario Aug 22 '10 at 20:12
    
@Dario maybe I havent understood well... what you mean it's the possibility of return something or not... so two types may be returned (something or void)... I have to wonder about that. –  Stephane Rolland Aug 22 '10 at 20:33
    
@Stephane Rolland: There are computations that will not always succeed. Returning undefined is not a good option since the option of failure is not covered by the type system and the validity of the result cannot be checked (you cannot pattern-match against undefined). Whenever there is a computation that can either return a value or fail, one should take Maybe a. E.g. parseNumber :: String -> Int is a bad choice since it doesn't cover the possibility that parsing fails. parseNumber :: String -> Maybe Int states this clearly without the danger of ending up with undefined values. –  Dario Aug 23 '10 at 10:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Intuitively I think would say they both should return an empty list. Could you correct me ? Why not ?

Well - head is [a] -> a. It returns the single, first element; no list.

And when there is no first element like in an empty list? Well what to return? You can't create a value of type a from nothing, so all that remains is undefined - an error.


And tail? Tail basically is a list without its first element - i.e. one item shorter than the original one. You can't uphold these laws when there is no first element.

When you take one apple out of a box, you can't have the same box (what happened when tail [] == []). The behaviour has to be undefined too.


This leads to the following conclusion:

I surely have not yet covered this topic in the tutorial, but isnt it a source of bugs ? I mean if ever passing to a function a list of arguments which may be optionnal, reading them with head may lead to a bug ?

Yes, it is a source of bugs, but because it allows to write flawed code. Code that's basically trying to read a value that doesn't exist. So: Don't ever use head/tail* - Use pattern matching.

sum     [] = 0
sum (x:xs) = x + sum xs

The compiler can guarantee that all possible cases are covered, values are always defined and it's much cleaner to read.

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x:xs yeah that's the way the thing was used in OzML (what I meant by left or right). I am really pleased with this way of writing. thx for the answer. –  Stephane Rolland Aug 22 '10 at 19:40
    
I rembember a safe head function with type [a]-> Maybe a –  Zhen Jul 6 '11 at 14:21
    
@Zhen: Yup of course. But handling the Maybe is usually not easier than pattern-matching the list as-is, though in some situations safeHead might be definitely useful. –  Dario Jul 27 '11 at 20:06

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