Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume I have a routine which takes an enumeration value as an argument and returns a Boolean ... and I want to check a set of those enumeration values to see if they are all true. Is there a idiomatic way to do it. This was my "old school" attempt which seems non-scala-ish:

def allUnitQueuesEmpty(): Boolean =
    ( getQueue(QID.CPU).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1C_I).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1D_I).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1VC_I).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1C_D).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1D_D).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1VC_D).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L1WB_D).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L2C).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.L2WB).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.MEM_RD).isEmpty() &&
      getQueue(QID.MEM_WRT).isEmpty() );

Can this be done with a List?

-Jay

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

No need for a list, actually. QID.values() returns an array of all QID values, and an array can be implicitly converted to a Scala collection, which allows you to define

def allUnitQueuesEmpty(): Boolean = QID.values.forall(v => getQueue(v).isEmpty)

If you only needed some of those values, this would work instead:

import QID._
def l1UnitQueuesEmpty(): Boolean = Array(L1C_I, L1D_I, L1VC_I).forall(v => getQueue(v).isEmpty)
share|improve this answer
add comment

All of Scala's collections have forall and exists methods which ascertain whether the collection to which they're applied satisfies the predicate supplied as an argument (over the elements of the collection) for every element (forall) or for at least one element (exists).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.