Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

i have code to save a file like

SaveFileDialog dialog = new SaveFileDialog();
dialog.Filter = "Text files|*.txt";

SaveDialog:
if ((bool)dialog.ShowDialog()) {
    if (System.IO.Path.GetExtension(dialog.FileName) != ".txt") {
        MessageBox.Show("You must select a .txt file");
        dialog.FileName = "";
        goto SaveDialog;
    }
    File.WriteAllText(dialog.FileName, txtEditor.Text);
}

i read that i should not use goto. i could use do/while and check that a valid extension was selected but that will add alot of unnecessary code. i find this neater. or is there a better/more correct way?

share|improve this question
1  
DialogResult cannot be cast to a boolean. :P – Siege Aug 23 '10 at 7:15
    
After so many years i have forgot about this key word. – Damian Leszczyński - Vash Aug 23 '10 at 7:20
    
@Siege: In WPF the result of ShowDialog() is a boolean – Matt Ellen Aug 23 '10 at 7:23
    
@jiewmeng: is this WPF or winforms? – Matt Ellen Aug 23 '10 at 7:26
    
@Matt Ellen: You're right (it's actually Nullable<bool>, which would explain the cast), for some reason I had assumed he was using WinForms. – Siege Aug 23 '10 at 7:35
up vote 5 down vote accepted
using (SaveFileDialog dialog = new SaveFileDialog())
{
    dialog.Filter = "Text files|*.txt";
    while(dialog.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
        if (System.IO.Path.GetExtension(dialog.FileName).ToLowerInvariant() != ".txt")
            MessageBox.Show("You must select a.txt file");
        else // file is ok
        {
            File.WriteAllText(dialog.FileName, txtEditor.Text);
            break;
        }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I would upvote this answer if you didn't use while (true). Put the next condition into the while-condition and it's good to go. If the user pressed cancel, he's not going to save the file anyway – Scoregraphic Aug 23 '10 at 7:24
    
You're absolutely right. Fixed it... also added the 'using' statement, as Bradley's answer suggests... good idea. – Nissim Aug 23 '10 at 7:34
    
i am getting an error saying type used in using must be implicitly convertible to System.IDisposable. also there is no DialogResult.OK – Jiew Meng Aug 23 '10 at 12:42
    
My answer applies to winforms, in which SaveFileDialog implements IDisposable. I'm not familiar with WPF, so if this errors continues - simply remove the 'using' statement Also, since this is WPF, change the 'while' condition to: while ((bool)dialog.ShowDialog()) – Nissim Aug 23 '10 at 13:11
    
FileDialogs are not IDisposable in WPF. – Xavier Poinas Aug 23 '10 at 23:04

I would suggest the following:

using (SaveFileDialog dialog = new SaveFileDialog()) {
    dialog.Filter = "Text files|*.txt";

    while (true) {
        if (dialog.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK) {
            if (!System.IO.Path.GetExtension(dialog.FileName).Equals(".txt", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase)) {
                MessageBox.Show("You must select a .txt file");
            }
            else {
                File.WriteAllText(dialog.FileName, txtEditor.Text);
                break; 
            }          
        }
        else break;
    }
}

While there are legitimate reasons for using the goto statement, in this case it can be avoided and replaced with a more readable solution.

Note also that you should not cast DialogResult (the return value of ShowDialog()) to bool.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Though what's that bool valid doing in there ? :-) Also nice point about using, so Dispose is called properly. – Steffen Aug 23 '10 at 7:22
    
My mistake, carried forward from an earlier idea. – Bradley Smith Aug 23 '10 at 7:22
    
This is the solution I was going to suggest. But honestly, while I dislike seeing 'goto' when an alternative method exists, infinite loops don't offer much more in terms of readability. – Siege Aug 23 '10 at 7:26
    
I would still argue that break/continue are more elegant constructs in terms of readability than goto. The only legitimate case i've ever found for using goto was in switch statements, where you can implement superset/subset logic using 'goto case [label]'. – Bradley Smith Aug 23 '10 at 7:29
    
@Bradley Smith. No, even then it's bad. Use method calls if you use the same piece of code twice. – Scoregraphic Aug 23 '10 at 7:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.