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Update - for those of a facetious frame of mind, you can assume that Aggregate still produces the normal result whatever function is passed to it, including in the case being optimized.

I wrote this program to build a long string of integers from 0 to 19999 separate by commas.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const int size = 20000;

            Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

            stopwatch.Start();
            Enumerable.Range(0, size).Select(n => n.ToString()).Aggregate((a, b) => a + ", " + b);
            stopwatch.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");
        }
    }
}

When I run it, it says:

5116ms

Over five seconds, terrible. Of course it's because the whole string is being copied each time around the loop.

But what if make one very small change indicated by the comment?

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
    using MakeAggregateGoFaster;  // <---- inserted this

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const int size = 20000;

            Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

            stopwatch.Start();
            Enumerable.Range(0, size).Select(n => n.ToString()).Aggregate((a, b) => a + ", " + b);
            stopwatch.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");
        }
    }
}

Now when I run it, it says:

42ms

Over 100x faster.

Question

What's in the MakeAggregateGoFaster namespace?

Update 2: Wrote up my answer here.

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by George Stocker Mar 18 at 14:54

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
what are you asking? did you write MakeAggregateGoFaster and this is a puzzle? –  Jimmy Dec 9 '08 at 23:15
    
The reason I put this onhold is that you've given us a "Hey, how did I make this go faster" without giving us the code; causing this to be a case of, "I could do a dozen different things to speed this up." Or: "This is a clever puzzle and I want you to solve it" -- both things Stack Overflow isn't really good for. –  George Stocker Mar 18 at 14:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You are 'overriding' System.Linq.Aggregate with your own extension method in namespace MakeAggregateGoFaster.

Perhaps specialised on IEnumerable<string> and making use of a StringBuilder?

Maybe taking an Expression<Func<string, string, string>> instead of a Func<string, string, string> so it can analyse the expression tree and compile some code that uses StringBuilder instead of calling the function directly?

Just guessing.

share|improve this answer

Well, that would depend entirely on what code is in the MageAggregateGoFaster namespace now wouldn't it?

This namespace is not part of the .NET runtime, so you've linked in some custom code.

Personally I would think that something that recognizes string concatenation or similar, and builds up a list, or similar, then allocates one big StringBuilder and uses Append.

A dirty solution would be:

namespace MakeAggregateGoFaster
{
    public static class Extensions
    {
        public static String Aggregate(this IEnumerable<String> source, Func<String, String, String> fn)
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            foreach (String s in source)
            {
                if (sb.Length > 0)
                    sb.Append(", ");
                sb.Append(s);
            }

            return sb.ToString();
        }
    }
}

dirty because this code, while doing what you say you experience with your program, does not use the function delegate at all. It will, however, bring down the execution time from around 2800ms to 11ms on my computer, and still produce the same results.

Now, next time, perhaps you should ask a real question instead of just look how clever I am type of chest-beating?

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Not answering the question, but I think the standard patterns here are to use StringBuilder or string.Join:

string.join(", ",Enumerable.Range(0, size).Select(n => n.ToString()).ToArray())
share|improve this answer
    
I just timed that, and it looks like if (size > 1,000,000) my version is faster (with the using statement added of course). –  Daniel Earwicker Dec 9 '08 at 23:21

The reason I asked if it was a puzzle was because a puzzle is allowed to sacrifice robustness in varying degrees as long as it satisfies the letter of the stated problem. With that in mind, here goes:

Solution 1 (runs instantly, problem doesn't validate):

public static string Aggregate(this IEnumerable<string> l, Func<string, string, string> f) {
     return "";
}

Solution 2 (runs about as fast as the problem requires, but ignores the delegate completely):

public static string Aggregate(this IEnumerable<string> l, Func<string, string, string> f) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    foreach (string item in l)
        sb.Append(", ").Append(item);
    return sb.Remove(0,2).ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

Why not use one of the other forms of Aggregate?

                Enumerable.Range(0, size ).Aggregate(new StringBuilder(),
                        (a, b) => a.Append(", " + b.ToString()),
                        (a) => a.Remove(0,2).ToString());

You can specify any type for your seed, perform whatever formatting or custom calls are needed in the first lambda function and then customize the output type in the second lambda function. The built in features already provide the flexibility you need. My runs went from 1444ms to 6ms.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why, but I had to add a null check on b in your example to get it to work: .Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (a, b) => a.Append("\n" + (b == null ? "" : b.ToString())), (a) => a.Remove(0, 2).ToString()); –  pabo May 24 '12 at 21:08

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