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You can do anonymous functions in C# like you can in JavaScript:

JavaScript:

var s = (function ()
{
    return "Hello World!";
}());

C#:

var s = new Func<String>(() =>
{
    return "Hello World!";
})();

... In JavaScript you can pass functions to be executed by other functions. On top of that; you can pass parameters to the function which gets executed:

var f = function (message) // function to be executed
{
    alert(message);
};

function execute(f) // function executing another function
{
    f("Hello World!"); // executing f; passing parameter ("message")
}

Is the above example possible in C#?


Update

Use-case: I am iterating over a bunch of database, logging specific entities. Instead of calling my second function (F()) inside Log() of Logger, I'd like to call F() outside the class.

... Something along the lines of:

public void F(String databaseName)
{
}

public class Logger
{
    public void Log(Function f)
    {
        var databaseName = "";

        f(databaseName);
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Absolutely - you just need to give the method an appropriate signature:

public void Execute(Action<string> action)
{
    action("Hello world");
}
...
Execute(x => Console.WriteLine(x));

Note that you do have to specify the particular delegate type in the parameter - you can't just declare it as Delegate for example.

EDIT: Your database example is exactly the same as this - you want to pass in a string and not get any output, which is exactly what Action<string> does. Except if you're trying to call an existing method (F() in your code) you don't even need a lambda expression - you can use method group conversions instead:

public void F(String databaseName)
{
}

public class Logger
{
    public void Log(Action<string> f)
    {
        var databaseName = "";

        f(databaseName);
    }
}

// Call it like this:
Logger logger = new Logger(...);
logger.Log(F);
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Updated my question. Could you take another look. And perhaps be a bit more elaborate? –  roosteronacid Aug 23 '10 at 9:22
    
@roosteronacid: My example is exactly what you need: the Action<string> delegate is basically a delegate which takes a string and acts on it, and then doesn't return anything... just like F(string) in your example. –  Jon Skeet Aug 23 '10 at 9:31

according your Update part: you need a container to keep your functions

 IList<Action<string>> actionList = new List<Action<Sstring>>();

in your Log() function you can add your F() to the container:

actionList.Add(F);

then invoke the function(s) somewhere outside:

 foreach (Action<string> func in actionList)
      {
           func("databasename");
      }
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You can pass delegate:

        var f = (Action<string>)
                (x =>
                     {
                         Console.WriteLine(x);
                     }
                );

        var execute = (Action<Action<string>>)
                      (cmd =>
                           {
                               cmd("Hello");
                           }
                      );
        execute(f);
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Like:

var s = new Func<String, string>((string name) =>
{
    return string.Format("Hello {0}!", name);
});

?

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