Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this document, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa365247(VS.85).aspx#paths

To make these device objects accessible by Windows applications, the device drivers create a symbolic link (symlink) in the Win32 namespace, "Global??", to their respective device objects. For example, COM0 and COM1 under the "Global??" subdirectory are simply symlinks to Serial0 and Serial1, "C:" is a symlink to HarddiskVolume1, "Physicaldrive0" is a symlink to DR0, and so on. Without a symlink, a specified device "Xxx" will not be available to any Windows application using Win32 namespace conventions as described previously. However, a handle could be opened to that device using any APIs that support the NT namespace absolute path of the format "\Device\Xxx".

What are the APIs? Let me know some such functions please.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Benjamin -

  1. The simple fact is that you CAN open a "special device file" in Windows, very much as you do in *nix. This is what I tried to say in my original reply. I stand by everything I said in my first post. And I believe the MSDN link I referred to there does a very good job of explaining this, too.

  2. The syntax for a *nix device file is "/dev/SOME_DEVICE". Multiple devices are (by convention, not necessity) distinguished as "/dev/SOME_DEVICE0", "/dev/SOME_DEVICE1", etc. Device files can also be "aliased" using *nix "symbolic links".

  3. The syntax for a Windows device file is a UNC name. I'm sure you're familiar with UNC shares (for example, "\\myserver\c$"). In all the examples we've discussed above, the server happens to be the local host. Hence "\\.\SOME_RESOURCE_NAME".

It's really as simple as that.

And it DOES work.

Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Thank you in advance .. PSM

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks paulsm & Larry. I misunderstood the sentences in MSDN. –  Benjamin Aug 25 '10 at 21:12

The concept of treating a "device" as a "file" is common in *nix (Unix, Linux, Mac OS, etc).

Basically, the MSDN article means that any Win32 API that opens a "file" (either a local disk file, or a UNC resource) could just as easily open a "special device".

A couple of examples:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa363858%28VS.85%29.aspx

  CreateFile
  WriteFile
  ReadFile
  CloseHandle
share|improve this answer
    
CreateFileW(L"\\Device\\Xxx", ...) Is it possible? I don't think so. It must be a symbolic lick in GLOBAL?? namespace. –  Benjamin Aug 23 '10 at 22:53
    
Look at the MSDN link I cited - I believe you'll find an example! Remember: "CreateFile()" is really pretty much a synonym for "open resource". It doesn't necessarily imply you're creating that resource from scratch. –  paulsm4 Aug 24 '10 at 5:26
1  
But you do need to use a different syntax: \\.\device\Xxx. –  Larry Osterman Aug 24 '10 at 5:42
    
@Larry It doesn't work. I can't open any device by the syntax. Does it work really? –  Benjamin Aug 24 '10 at 12:06
    
Did you read the "Win32 Device Namespaces" part of the article you linked? Where did you get the device name you mentioned above? –  Larry Osterman Aug 24 '10 at 13:29

The answers provided so far are misleading at best. They do not answer your question or cover the important distinction between the NT namespace and the other namespaces.

When accessing the NT namespace you need to use the API calls that start with Nt, such as NtOpenFile, if you want to access devices that are only found in the NT namespace of the kernel. For example, a device in \Devices with no symbolic link in \GLOBAL??.

The other calls mentioned above work fine if you are accessing the Win32 device namespace but these require the driver to create a symbolic link in that namespace.

If you want to access a device that is only found in the NT namespace then use NTOpenFile http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb432381(v=vs.85).aspx This is really a very old API call and has drifted in and out of the userpace header files. It is available again and works just fine.

Cheers, Robert

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.