Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

OOP interfaces.

share|improve this question
12  
When your title is longer than the content of your question, then it's probably not a well-formulated question. You want good answers, please provide a good question. –  Joachim Sauer Aug 23 '10 at 11:08
    
see this old quesion for related discussion –  Matt Ellen Aug 23 '10 at 16:30
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. An Interface totally abstracts away the implementation knowledge from the client.
  2. It allows us to change their behavior dynamically. This means how it will act depends on dynamic specialization (or substitution).
  3. It prevents the client from being broken if the developer made some changes to implementation or added new specialization/implementation.
  4. It gives an open way to extend an implementation.

Programming language (C#, java )

These languages do not support multiple inheritance from classes, however, they do support multiple inheritance from interfaces; this is yet another advantage of an interface.

share|improve this answer
8  
I would +1 this if it wasn't written so horrible that you have to read every sentence twice. –  dbemerlin Aug 23 '10 at 10:59
    
Markdown has support for lists, please use them when appropriate (and don't throw text in a code block like that!) –  Jasper Aug 23 '10 at 11:03
2  
@dbemerlin I would vote your comment as being great if you would be honest and admit that you needed to read each item for more than two times. –  thelost Aug 23 '10 at 11:05
    
@dbemerlin i know its a bit late, but I gave my attempt at fixing it. –  SiegeX Jun 21 '13 at 16:41
add comment

In my own experience I find interfaces very useful when it comes to design and implement multiple inter-operating modules with multiple developers. For example, if there are two developers, one working on backend and other on frontend (UI) then they can start working in parallel once they have interfaces finalized. Thus, if everyone follows the defined contract then the integration later becomes painless. And thats what interfaces precisely do - define the contract!

Basically it avoids this situation : alt text

share|improve this answer
    
Very funny and suggestive :) –  thelost Aug 23 '10 at 11:09
6  
Hey, this reminds me of my work... which in turns reminds me... have to get back to it (D*mn you SO!) –  dbemerlin Aug 23 '10 at 11:10
2  
unfortunately refactoring won't be easy for those guys as for software people –  Arseny Aug 23 '10 at 13:43
add comment

Interfaces are very useful when you need a class to operate on generic methods implemented by subclasses.

public class Person
{
  public void Eat(IFruit fruit)
  {
    Console.WriteLine("The {0} is delicious!",fruit.Name);
  }
}

public interface IFruit
{
   string Name { get; }
}
public class Apple : IFruit
{
  public string Name
  {
    get { return "Apple"; }
  }
}
public class Strawberry : IFruit
{
  public string Name
  {
    get { return "Strawberry"; }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Interfaces are very useful, in case of multiple inheritance.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Basically Interfaces allow a Program to change the Implementation without having to tell all clients that they now need a "Bar" Object instead of a "Foo" Object. It tells the users of this class what it does, not what it is.

Example:

A Method you wrote wants to loop through the values given to it. Now there are several things you can iterate over, like Lists, Arrays and Collections.

Without Interfaces you would have to write:

public class Foo<T>
{
    public void DoSomething(T items[])
    {
    }

    public void DoSomething(List<T> items)
    {
    }

    public void DoSomething(SomeCollectionType<T> items)
    {
    }

}

And for every new iteratable type you'd have to add another method or the user of your class would have to cast his data. For example with this solution if he has a Collection of FooCollectionType he has to cast it to an Array, List or SomeOtherCollectionType.

With interfaces you only need:

public class Foo<T>
{
    public void DoSomething(IEnumerable<T> items)
    {
    }
}

This means your class only has to know that, whatever the user passes to it can be iterated over. If the user changes his SomeCollectionType to AnotherCollectionType he neither has to cast nor change your class.

Take note that abstract base classes allow for the same sort of abstraction but have some slight differences in usage.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.