Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

ExecuteNonQuery requires an open and available Connection. The connection's current state is closed.

What am I doing wrong here? I'm assuming you can reuse the connection?

Thanks for any help!

using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["LocalSqlServer"].ToString()))
{
    cn.Open();

    // If we are reverting to an old type
    if (pageAction == "revert")
    {
        debug.Text = "FLAG 1";

        // Get the revert ID
        int revertingID = int.Parse(Request.QueryString["revID"]);
        bool rowsReturned = false;

        debug.Text = "FLAG 2 - " + revertingID.ToString();

        // Set all to 0
        using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT ID FROM tblSiteSettings WHERE ID = " + revertingID, cn))
        {
            // If it exists
            SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);
            if (rdr.Read())
            {
                rowsReturned = true;
            }
            rdr.Close();
        }

        debug.Text = "FLAG 3 - " + rowsReturned.ToString();

        // Set new active and reset others
        if (rowsReturned == true)
        {
            using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("UPDATE tblSiteSettings SET isActive = 1 WHERE ID = " + revertingID, cn))
            {
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
            using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("UPDATE tblSiteSettings SET isActive = 0 WHERE ID <> " + revertingID, cn))
            {
                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }
        //debug.Text = "FLAG 4 - ";
    }
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your problem is:

SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);

You should just call cmd.ExecuteReader()' if you want to use the connection again prior to "getting rid" of it. If you want to get an understanding for what the CommandBehaviour.CloseConnection part does/means then the documentation for SqlCommand.ExecuteReader is a good bet. There's also documentation to tell you what all the possible values of the CommandBehaviour enumeration are. Essentially CommandBehaviour.CloseConnection does the following:

When the command is executed, the associated Connection object is closed when the associated DataReader object is closed.

If you have no special need to specify a CommandBehaviour, then either specify CommandBehaviour.Default, or don't specify one at all. CommandBehaviour.Default is:

The query may return multiple result sets. Execution of the query may affect the database state. Default sets no CommandBehavior flags, so calling ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.Default) is functionally equivalent to calling ExecuteReader().

share|improve this answer
    
Does the Using() statement his commands are wrapped in close the connection as well when it disposes the SqlCommand? –  Tommy Aug 23 '10 at 13:52
    
@Tommy, not as far as I'm aware - the documentation for SqlCommand.Dispose doesn't call it out, so I'd assume not (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Rob Aug 23 '10 at 13:58
    
Good call, if the connection definition was wrapped in a Using block, then it would. stackoverflow.com/questions/410222/… –  Tommy Aug 23 '10 at 14:06
add comment

You're closing the connection rdr.Close(); and never re-opening it before calling ExecuteNonQuery().

You don't actually need to close it at all if it's wrapped in a using as the call to Dispose() will automatically close the connection for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It appears you are doing a read before doing your ExecuteNonQuery. In your first call to SqlCommand (for the SELECT), you are closing the connection after the read is complete.

SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection);

Remove the command behavior, you should be good to go, or re-open the connection in your next if statement.

This

SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

Or this

if (rowsReturned == true){
   cn.open();
share|improve this answer
add comment

Right here, your SqlDataReader will close the connection when it completes:

// Set all to 0 
using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT ID FROM tblSiteSettings WHERE ID = " + revertingID, cn)) 
{ 
    // If it exists 
    SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection); 
    if (rdr.Read()) 
    { 
        rowsReturned = true; 
    } 
    rdr.Close(); 
} 

Later, the "Set new active and reset others" section will fail, because the connection is closed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.