Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've used a regular expression in @Path to achieve overloading and at first I thought it was really neat, but overloading methods is usually not good practice. Does the same apply to RESTful web services? Is there a better way to achieve this using JAX-RS?

So I can now call my getProject REST service by /project/ProjectNumber1000 or /project/12345

@Path("/project")
public class ProjectPropertiesResource
{
    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
    @Path("/{name : [a-zA-Z]+}")
    public Response getProjectPropertiesByName(@PathParam("name") String name)
    {
         ...
    }

    @GET
    @Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
    @Path("/{id : \\d+}")
    public Response getProjectPropertiesById(@PathParam("id") long id)
    {
         ...
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Maybe it's just me, but I don't see any overloading in your example. Both methods have different names. –  Jeroen Rosenberg Aug 23 '10 at 13:57
1  
I've 'overloaded' the path to access those methods. The methods themselves have different name as I don't usually use overloading. –  willcodejavaforfood Aug 23 '10 at 14:03
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do it, however, only one of the overloads should actually return response body with a 200. The other overloads should return a 303 redirect to the URI that returns the body.

This will ensure that caches only have one copy of the resource and if you do PUT or POST on the main URI you will invalidate the one copy. Otherwise, you can start to get inconsistent results due to different versions existing in the cache.

share|improve this answer
    
OK that is a good point, so I would just use Response.temporaryRedirect in one of the methods –  willcodejavaforfood Aug 23 '10 at 14:10
    
Yes, something like that. 303 is actually "See Other" not "temporary redirect". –  Darrel Miller Aug 23 '10 at 15:17
    
OK the 'Used in the redirect-after-POST (aka POST/redirect/GET) pattern.' comment in the JavaDoc scared me off that one –  willcodejavaforfood Aug 23 '10 at 15:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.