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The old JS SDK had a function called FB.ensureInit. The new SDK does not seem to have such function... how can I ensure that I do not make api calls until it is fully initiated?

I include this in the top of every page:

<div id="fb-root"></div>
<script>
  window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
      appId  : '<?php echo $conf['fb']['appid']; ?>',
      status : true, // check login status
      cookie : true, // enable cookies to allow the server to access the session
      xfbml  : true  // parse XFBML
    });
    FB.Canvas.setAutoResize();
  };

  (function() {
    var e = document.createElement('script');
    e.src = document.location.protocol + '//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js';
    e.async = true;
    document.getElementById('fb-root').appendChild(e);
  }());
</script>
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See this link for my solution to this problem. facebook.stackoverflow.com/questions/12399428/… –  Remi Grumeau Feb 18 '13 at 17:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 105 down vote accepted

Update on Jan 04, 2012

It seems like you can't just call FB-dependent methods (for example FB.getAuthResponse()) right after FB.init() like before, as FB.init() seems to be asynchronous now. Wrapping your code into FB.getLoginStatus() response seems to do the trick of detecting when API is fully ready:

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
        //...
    });

    FB.getLoginStatus(function(response){
        runFbInitCriticalCode(); 
    });

};  

or if using fbEnsureInit() implementation from below:

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
        //...
    });

    FB.getLoginStatus(function(response){
        fbApiInit = true;
    });

};  

Original Post:

If you want to just run some script when FB is initialized you can put some callback function inside fbAsyncInit:

  window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
      appId  : '<?php echo $conf['fb']['appid']; ?>',
      status : true, // check login status
      cookie : true, // enable cookies to allow the server to access the session
      xfbml  : true  // parse XFBML
    });
    FB.Canvas.setAutoResize();

    runFbInitCriticalCode(); //function that contains FB init critical code
  };

If you want exact replacement of FB.ensureInit then you would have to write something on your own as there is no official replacement (big mistake imo). Here is what I use:

  window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
      appId  : '<?php echo $conf['fb']['appid']; ?>',
      status : true, // check login status
      cookie : true, // enable cookies to allow the server to access the session
      xfbml  : true  // parse XFBML
    });
    FB.Canvas.setAutoResize();

    fbApiInit = true; //init flag
  };

  function fbEnsureInit(callback) {
        if(!window.fbApiInit) {
            setTimeout(function() {fbEnsureInit(callback);}, 50);
        } else {
            if(callback) {
                callback();
            }
        }
    }

Usage:

fbEnsureInit(function() {
    console.log("this will be run once FB is initialized");
});
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2  
Thank you Serg.. you are a legend! –  Pablo Aug 23 '10 at 15:31
    
@Pablo lol thanks :) –  serg Aug 23 '10 at 15:36
3  
I'm not able to run a Facebook API request immediately after FB.init is called -- perhaps because the method I'm using is 'fql.query'? Either way, I have to set a lengthy timeout on the fbApiInit flag. –  Ian Hunter Dec 9 '11 at 18:18
    
Thanks for the update - I was having the same problem and your updated solution worked perfectly! –  Terri Ann Jan 17 '12 at 22:58
    
@beanland, fql.query api calls require that the user has logged in. Are you sure that you are running the query after getting a response back from FB.getLoginStatus(function(response){}? -- note the difference the "updated answer" vs. the "original answer" above. –  tjmehta Feb 22 '12 at 7:12

Actually Facebook has already provided a mechanism to subscribe to authentication events.

In your case you are using "status: true" which means that FB object will request Facebook for user's login status.

FB.init({
    appId  : '<?php echo $conf['fb']['appid']; ?>',
    status : true, // check login status
    cookie : true, // enable cookies to allow the server to access the session
    xfbml  : true  // parse XFBML
});

By calling "FB.getLoginStatus()" you are running the same request again.

Instead you could use FB.Event.subscribe to subscribe to auth.statusChange or auth.authResponseChange event BEFORE you call FB.init

FB.Event.subscribe('auth.statusChange', function(response) {
    if(response.status == 'connected') {
        runFbInitCriticalCode();
    }
});

FB.init({
    appId  : '<?php echo $conf['fb']['appid']; ?>',
    status : true, // check login status
    cookie : true, // enable cookies to allow the server to access the session
    xfbml  : true  // parse XFBML
});

Most likely, when using "status: false" you can run any code right after FB.init, because there will be no asynchronous calls.

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NOTE : With this method the only caveat is that, if you are not logged in, the event will not be triggered. Just make your default UI state as if not authenticated, and it works perfectly. You can then check for connected or not_authorized inside of the event handler. –  David C Jan 22 at 17:38

Here is a solution in case you use and Facebook Asynchronous Lazy Loading:

// listen to an Event
$(document).bind('fbInit',function(){
    console.log('fbInit complete; FB Object is Available');
});

// FB Async
window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({appId: 'app_id', 
         status: true, 
         cookie: true,
         oauth:true,
         xfbml: true});

    $(document).trigger('fbInit'); // trigger event
};
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2  
I love it! The only issue is that Facebook insists that you should include your FB init code directly after the opening <body> tag, and best practice says you should load jQuery before the closing <body> tag. Doh! Chicken and egg. I'm tempting to say "screw you, Facebook" and load FB after jQuery. –  Ethan Brown May 1 '13 at 1:06

While some of the above solutions work, I thought I'd post our eventual solution - which defines a 'ready' method that will fire as soon as FB is initialized and ready to go. It has the advantage over other solutions that it's safe to call either before or after FB is ready.

It can be used like so:

f52.fb.ready(function() {
    // safe to use FB here
});

Here's the source file (note that it's defined within a 'f52.fb' namespace).

if (typeof(f52) === 'undefined') { f52 = {}; }
f52.fb = (function () {

    var fbAppId = f52.inputs.base.fbAppId,
        fbApiInit = false;

    var awaitingReady = [];

    var notifyQ = function() {
        var i = 0,
            l = awaitingReady.length;
        for(i = 0; i < l; i++) {
            awaitingReady[i]();
        }
    };

    var ready = function(cb) {
        if (fbApiInit) {
            cb();
        } else {
            awaitingReady.push(cb);
        }
    };

    window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
        FB.init({
            appId: fbAppId,
            xfbml: true,
            version: 'v2.0'
        });

        FB.getLoginStatus(function(response){
            fbApiInit = true;
            notifyQ();
        });
    };

    return {
        /**
         * Fires callback when FB is initialized and ready for api calls.
         */
        'ready': ready
    };

})();
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I've avoided using setTimeout by using a global function:

EDIT NOTE: I've updated the following helper scripts and created a class that easier/simpler to use; check it out here ::: https://github.com/tjmehta/fbExec.js

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
        //...
    });
    window.fbApiInit = true; //init flag
    if(window.thisFunctionIsCalledAfterFbInit)
        window.thisFunctionIsCalledAfterFbInit();
};

fbEnsureInit will call it's callback after FB.init

function fbEnsureInit(callback){
  if(!window.fbApiInit) {
    window.thisFunctionIsCalledAfterFbInit = callback; //find this in index.html
  }
  else{
    callback();
  }
}

fbEnsureInitAndLoginStatus will call it's callback after FB.init and after FB.getLoginStatus

function fbEnsureInitAndLoginStatus(callback){
  runAfterFbInit(function(){
    FB.getLoginStatus(function(response){
      if (response.status === 'connected') {
        // the user is logged in and has authenticated your
        // app, and response.authResponse supplies
        // the user's ID, a valid access token, a signed
        // request, and the time the access token
        // and signed request each expire
        callback();

      } else if (response.status === 'not_authorized') {
        // the user is logged in to Facebook,
        // but has not authenticated your app

      } else {
        // the user isn't logged in to Facebook.

      }
    });
  });
}

fbEnsureInit example usage:

(FB.login needs to be run after FB has been initialized)

fbEnsureInit(function(){
    FB.login(
       //..enter code here
    );
});

fbEnsureInitAndLogin example usage:

(FB.api needs to be run after FB.init and FB user must be logged in.)

fbEnsureInitAndLoginStatus(function(){
    FB.api(
       //..enter code here
    );
});
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1  
I wrote this helper class that performs the same as above in an easier and cleaner way; check it out here:: github.com/tjmehta/fbExec.js –  tjmehta Apr 25 '12 at 5:32

The Facebook API watches for the FB._apiKey so you can watch for this before calling your own application of the API with something like:

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
  FB.init({
    //...your init object
  });
  function myUseOfFB(){
    //...your FB API calls
  };
  function FBreadyState(){
    if(FB._apiKey) return myUseOfFB();
    setTimeout(FBreadyState, 100); // adjust time as-desired
  };
  FBreadyState();
}; 

Not sure this makes a difference but in my case--because I wanted to be sure the UI was ready--I've wrapped the initialization with jQuery's document ready (last bit above):

  $(document).ready(FBreadyState);

Note too that I'm NOT using async = true to load Facebook's all.js, which in my case seems to be helping with signing into the UI and driving features more reliably.

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You can subscribe to the event:

ie)

FB.Event.subscribe('auth.login', function(response) {
  FB.api('/me', function(response) {
    alert(response.name);
  });
});
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Instead of using any setTimeout or setInterval I would stick to deferred objects (implementation by jQuery here). It's still tricky to resolve queue in proper moment, because init don't have callbacks but combining result with event subscription (as someone pointed before me), should do the trick and be close enough.

Pseudo-snippet would look as follows:

FB.Event.subscribe('auth.statusChange', function(response) {
   if (response.authResponse) {
       // user has auth'd your app and is logged into Facebook
   } else {
       // user has not auth'd your app, or is not logged into Facebook
   }
   DeferredObject.resolve();
});
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Another way to check if FB has initialized is by using the following code:

ns.FBInitialized = function () {
    return typeof (FB) != 'undefined' && window.fbAsyncInit.hasRun;
};

Thus in your page ready event you could check ns.FBInitialized and defer the event to later phase by using setTimeOut.

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