Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

By using Activator.CreateInstance we can create objects of a class, even if the constructor is private.

Is there anyway to prevent this?

share|improve this question
1  
What's in your private constructor that you want to hide from Activator.CreateInstance? –  Tim Robinson Aug 23 '10 at 16:31
    
@Tim: does it matter? –  Erich Mirabal Aug 23 '10 at 20:42
    
@Erich, potentially yes. Depending on what the OP is trying to achieve, there may be a better way that doesn't involve having a private constructor. –  Tim Robinson Aug 24 '10 at 7:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Reflection breaks encapsulation in general. Any private member of any type (constructor, method, property, field, you name it) can be accessed using reflection (Activator.CreateInstance falls under this umbrella).

That said, if you want your type not to be instantiatable via the overload of Activator.CreateInstance generally used to overcome private constructors, you could get rid of its parameterless constructor for your type altogether (by defining only constructors that take parameters).

You still can't do anything about someone using one of the overloads that specifies parameters, though.

share|improve this answer

The short answer: You can't

The more detailed answer: Read about .NET code access security. It's possible to run code in a limited-trust environment; partially trusted code can't bypass access restrictions. By default, code runs with full trust, and full-trust code can use reflection to access private members.

share|improve this answer

There is a way to prevent it from happening, but it's not pretty: In the private constructor, you can add some checks based on the StackTrace class. Create a new StackTrace within your private constructor. Call GetFrames() and iterate over them, checking to see if any of the frames contain a call from the Activator type. Within the StackFrame. you can query for the method via GetMethod function. That returns a MethodBase which inherits from MemberInfo class. That will have the DeclaringType property you care about.

As you iterate over the stack frame, if you notice that one the invoking types is the Activator class, you know your private constructor is being called via that approach.

You should only need to look at two stackframes (skipping over your current one) to verify this. I believe that there is one other way besides the Activator class to instantiate using reflection, but I don't remember it at this point.

share|improve this answer

I know it's an older post but I ran into it and I just couldn't resist.

There is a way to prevent Activator to access the private constructor. For example in the Singleton pattern class using a nested class:

public sealed class SingletonClass
{


 SingletonClass()
    {
    }

public static SingletonClass Instance
{
    get
    {
        return InnerClass.instance;
    }
}

class InnerClass
{
    static InnerClass()
    {
    }

    internal static readonly SingletonClass instance = new SingletonClass();
}

}

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.