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I'm new to C++ STL, and I'm having trouble comprehending the graph representation.

vector<int> adj[N];

So does this create an array of type vector or does this create a vector of arrays? The BFS code seems to traverse through a list of values present at each instance of adj[i], and hence it seems works like an array of vectors. Syntax for creating a vector is:

vector<int> F;

which would effectively create a single dimensional vector F.

What is the difference between

vector< vector<int> > N; 

and

vector<int> F[N]
share|improve this question
1  
Try reading it from right to left. In this case it becomes array of vectors. – Selçuk Cihan Feb 19 at 14:50
    
int x[N]; is an array of int; vector<int> y[N]; is an array of vector<int>. – Pete Becker Feb 19 at 17:09
    
Remember, for any array defined as T name[N], you have an array, name, with N elements of type T. Also, while we're on the subject of arrays, std::array<T, N> is a container for an array in the form of T name[N], just as std::vector<T> is a container for a variable-length array of type T. – Justin Time Feb 20 at 3:58
up vote 24 down vote accepted

So does this (vector<int> adj[N];) create an array of type vector or does this create a vector of arrays?

It creates array of vectors

What is the difference between

vector< vector<int> > N; 

and

vector<int> F[N]

In the first case you are creating a dynamic array of dynamic arrays. (vector of vectors). The size of each vector could be changed at the runtime and all objects will be allocated on the heap.

In the second case you are creating a fixed-size array of vectors. You have to define N at compile-time, and all vectors will be placed on the stack, however, each vector will allocate elements on the heap.

I'd always prefer vector of vectors case (or the matrix, if you could use third-party libraries), or std::array of std::arrays in case of compile-time sizes.

I'm new to C++ STL, and I'm having trouble comprehending the graph representation.

You may also represent graph as a std::unordered_map<vertex_type, std::unordered_set<vertex_type>>, where vertex_type is the type of vertex (int in your case). This approach could be used in order to reduce memory usage when the number of edges isn't huge.


: To be precise - not always on stack - it may be a part of a complex object on the heap. Moreover, C++ standard does not define any requirements for stack or heap, it provides only requirements for storage duration, such are automatic, static, thread or dynamic.

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1  
Not wanting to be picky but vector<int> F[N] does not necessarily allocate F on the stack. It depends on the context. – Mohamad Elghawi Feb 19 at 9:56
1  
@MohamadElghawi, do you mean automatic / dynamic storages? – soon Feb 19 at 10:00
1  
For example: it can have static storage duration or even be placed in the heap if it is inside an object that gets newed. – Mohamad Elghawi Feb 19 at 10:01
1  
No, it does not offer any benefits in this case. As I already said, it could be used in order to reduce memory usage, since adjacency matrix takes N^2 memory, where N is the number of vertices. – soon Feb 19 at 10:22
1  
@thematroids, "that shouldn't affect traversal sequence" - so long as you filled the graph and don't modify it. – soon Feb 19 at 10:24
vector<int> arr[N];

It displays an array of vector, each array[i] would have a vector stored in it that can traverse through many values. It is like a an Array of Linked List where the heads are only stored in array[i] positions.


vector<vector<int> > N vs vector<int> F[N]

The difference between 2D Vector and an Array of Vector is that 2D Vectors can span in size while array of vectors have their dimension fixed for the array size.

share|improve this answer
    
And also an vector is a standard C++ library container (as is also a std::array) allowing the use of iterators, algorythms, and so on, while a simple array is just a low level data structure with no wrapping nor goodies. Prefere first for high level programming and second for low level one - implementation for std::array or std::vector do use arrays... – Serge Ballesta Feb 19 at 9:28
1  
@SergeBallesta You can use iterators and algorithms with raw arrays, e.g. using the global begin and end functions. – tuple_cat Feb 19 at 10:31

Under the hood a vector still uses array, it is implementation specific but is safe to think that:

vector<int>

internally creates an int[]. What vectors gives you is that it abstract from you the part where if you want to re-size you don't have to re-allocate manually etc, it does that for you (plus much more of course). When you do: vector<vector<int>> you are going to create a vector of vectors, meaning a 2D matrix. You can nest it as much as you want. Vector takes in a type T and allocates an array of that type. so if you pass vector as type T, it will effectively do what you did in your first line, an array of vector<int>. Hope it makes sense

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Short Answer:
It's an array of vector <int>s.

Long Answer:
When reading a declaration such as

vector<int> adj[N];

The compiler uses a method known as the "spiral-" or "clockwise-rule" in order to interpret what it means. The idea behind the spiral rule is that you start at the variable name, and move outwards in a clockwise spiral in order to figure out what type of variable it is. For example:

char* str [10];

Can be interpreted like this: Clockwise Spiral graphic

Therefore, vector<int> adj[N]; is an array of vectors rather than a vector of arrays



Practice makes perfect:

1: What does int * foo [ ]; mean?

Answer:

"foo" is an array of pointers to integers


2: What does int * (*foo [ ] )(); mean?

Answer:

"foo" is an array of pointers to functions returning pointers to integers


3: What does int * (*(*foo [ ] )())(); mean?

Answer:

"foo" is an array of pointers to functions returning pointers to functions returning pointers to integers

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Sorry for not posting the picture directly. Unfortunately, I don't yet have the required reputation. – Chef Cyanide Feb 20 at 1:48
    
^ Nevermind, I added the graphic. – Chef Cyanide Mar 28 at 0:04

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