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In C#, what is the difference between ToUpper() and ToUpperInvariant()?

Can you give an example where the results might be different?

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1  
Because upvoting a question can help you get a badge... I didn't upvote this question, just sayin –  taylonr Aug 23 '10 at 18:16
17  
because the stated goal of the site is to contain information about programming and that "No question is too basic" (stackoverflow.com/questions/1003841/…) –  Nathan Koop Aug 23 '10 at 18:17
3  
I think most people who answered this question knew the answer without googling it. –  Armstrongest Aug 23 '10 at 18:35
2  
To answer Stefanvds,"...when googling 'ToUpperInvariant()' and picking the 3rd result ..." That is precisely the reason I asked this question on StackOverflow. Because I don’t have time to read, ’n’ number of Google matches (after first checking for an answer on StackOverflow) to find an answer that generally contains not enough, or too much information, that may or not be correct. In this case, the word “Turkish” which is sort of the operative answer here, yes, is on the 3rd google hit, but is buried somewhere where I needed to scroll down to see it . –  Lill Lansey Aug 25 '10 at 13:30
2  
This is a good, simple question that encourages informative answers. +1 –  Jeff Yates May 24 '11 at 16:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 60 down vote accepted

ToUpper uses the current culture. ToUpperInvariant uses the invariant culture.

The canonical example is Turkey, where the upper case of "i" isn't "I".

Sample code showing the difference:

using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;

public class Test
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        string invariant = "iii".ToUpperInvariant();
        CultureInfo turkey = new CultureInfo("tr-TR");
        Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = turkey;
        string cultured = "iii".ToUpper();

        Font bigFont = new Font("Arial", 40);
        Form f = new Form {
            Controls = {
                new Label { Text = invariant, Location = new Point(20, 20),
                            Font = bigFont, AutoSize = true},
                new Label { Text = cultured, Location = new Point(20, 100),
                            Font = bigFont, AutoSize = true }
            }
        };        
        Application.Run(f);
    }
}

For more on Turkish, see this Turkey Test blog post.

I wouldn't be surprised to hear that there are various other capitalization issues around elided characters etc. This is just one example I know off the top of my head... partly because it bit me years ago in Java, where I was upper-casing a string and comparing it with "MAIL". That didn't work so well in Turkey...

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1  
+1 for Turkey example (not for Jon Skeetishness :} ) –  Armstrongest Aug 23 '10 at 17:54
16  
haha I read that thinking... "'Turkey' doesn't have a letter 'i' in it" –  Jeff Mercado Aug 23 '10 at 17:57

Jon's answer is perfect. I just wanted to add that ToUpperInvariant is the same as calling ToUpper(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture).

That makes Jon's example a little simpler:

using System;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Threading;
using System.Windows.Forms;

public class Test
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        string invariant = "iii".ToUpper(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        string cultured = "iii".ToUpper(new CultureInfo("tr-TR"));

        Application.Run(new Form {
            Font = new Font("Times New Roman", 40),
            Controls = { 
                new Label { Text = invariant, Location = new Point(20, 20), AutoSize = true }, 
                new Label { Text = cultured, Location = new Point(20, 100), AutoSize = true }, 
            }
        });
    }
}

I also used New Times Roman because it's a cooler font.

I also set the Form's Font property instead of the two Label controls because the Font property is inherited.

And I reduced a few other lines just because I like compact (example, not production) code.

I really had nothing better to do at the moment.

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there is no difference in english. only in turkish culture a difference can be found.

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8  
And you're sure that Turkish is the only culture in the world that has different rules for upper-case than English? I find that hard to believe. –  Joel Mueller Aug 23 '10 at 17:59
2  
Turkish is the most often used example, but not the only one. And it's the language, not the culture that has four different I's. Still, +1 for Turkish. –  Armstrongest Aug 23 '10 at 18:01
    
sure there must be some others. most ppl will never ever meet those languages in programming anyway –  Stefanvds Aug 23 '10 at 18:11
6  
Sure they will. Web Applications are open to the globe and it's good to set your parameters. What if you're operating on a legacy database that doesn't do unicode? What characters will you accept as a username? What if you have to put in Customer names into a Legacy ERP built on COBOL? Lots of cases where the culture is important. Not to mention, dates and numbers. 4.54 is written 4,54 in some languages. Pretending those other languages don't exist won't get you very far in the long run. –  Armstrongest Aug 23 '10 at 18:30
    
obviously cultures are important for dates and numbers, i'm just telling most ppl will never meet the languages which have a different result in toUpper and toUpperInvariant. –  Stefanvds Aug 24 '10 at 7:12

ToUpperInvariant uses the rules from the invariant culture

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Start with MSDN

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.toupperinvariant.aspx

The ToUpperInvariant method is equivalent to ToUpper(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)

Just because a capital i is 'I' in English, doesn't always make it so.

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http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.string.toupperinvariant.aspx

Microsoft documentation explains differences and gives examples of differing results.

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