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Suppose I have class A with a virtual function F():

class A
{
    virtual void F()
    {
        // Do something
    };
};

And I have another class B which inherits A and redefines F():

class B : A
{
    void F()
    {
        // Do something
    };
};

And a different class C which also inherits A but overrides F():

class C : A
{
    void F() override
    {
        // Do something
    };
};

What is the difference between F() in classes B and C?

share|improve this question
up vote 25 down vote accepted

Both B::f() and C::f() are overrides and they are exactly the same.

override is essentially a compile-time advisory term that will cause a compilation error if the function does not override one in a base class.

This can help program stability: if the name and parameter types to A::f() are changed, then a compile error will result.

share|improve this answer

Both are overrides.

When you use the keyword override you ensure a compilation failure if it should happen to not be an override.

And that's good practice.

share|improve this answer
3  
Not to mention the readability factor when perusing repositories like git – Tgsmith61591 Feb 19 at 13:49
    
@Tgsmith61591: Yes. I also wondered whether to include an example of how to overload (essentially "redefine") without overriding. But I decided to be concise. :) – Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 19 at 13:51

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