Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the main difference between StringBuffer and StringBuilder? Is there any performance issues when deciding on any one of these?

share|improve this question
add comment

23 Answers

up vote 444 down vote accepted

StringBuffer is synchronized, StringBuilder is not.

share|improve this answer
83  
and StringBuilder is intended as a drop in replacement for StringBuffer where synchronisation is not required –  Joel Dec 23 '09 at 8:52
18  
and synchronization is virtually never required. If someone wants to synchronize on a StringBuilder, they can just surround the entire block of code with a synchronized (sb) { } on the instance –  locka Apr 24 '13 at 16:06
4  
@locka I would argue that StringBuffer is never a good idea (unless you have an API which requires it) vanillajava.blogspot.de/2013/04/… –  Peter Lawrey Sep 4 '13 at 10:21
3  
Only place I see for a StringBuffer is console like output and various logging utility: many thread may output in conflict. Since you don't want 2 output to get mixed up... but usually synchronizing at StringBuffer level is too low level, you will want to synchronize at an appender like levelm so locka answer is the best and StringBuilder should be deprecated. It would save code review time with newbies. –  Remi Morin Feb 17 at 16:10
add comment

StringBuilder is faster than StringBuffer because it's not synchronized.

Here's a simple benchmark test:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int N = 77777777;
        long t;

        {
            StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
            t = System.currentTimeMillis();
            for (int i = N; i --> 0 ;) {
                sb.append("");
            }
            System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - t);
        }

        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            t = System.currentTimeMillis();
            for (int i = N; i --> 0 ;) {
                sb.append("");
            }
            System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - t);
        }
    }
}

A test run gives the numbers of 2241 ms for StringBuffer vs 753 ms for StringBuilder.

share|improve this answer
69  
+1 for testing the performance. –  Alfredo Osorio Sep 28 '11 at 14:21
3  
I changed the string literal to something larger: "the quick brown fox " and got more interesting results. Basically, they are about as fast. I actually ran out of memory so I had to remove a few sevens. Explanation: the synchronization is optimized away by hotspot. You are basically just measuring the time it takes hotspot to do this (and probably some more optimizations). –  Jilles van Gurp Aug 26 '12 at 15:25
26  
+1 for the Ascii Art in the loop condition. –  MonoThreaded Mar 22 '13 at 20:53
    
Agree with Alfredo. Adding to Jiles comment, when used with one char string ("A"), the ration is like 2 x 1 (2 for StringBuffer). using more than 3 chars and I got "OutOfMemoryError"! (-Xms512m/-Xmx1024m) –  Ricardo Rivaldo Apr 2 '13 at 14:27
1  
+1, for the example. This really helped. :) –  Ankit Jun 9 '13 at 6:08
add comment

Basically, StringBuffer methods are synchronized while StringBuilder are not.

The operations are "almost" the same, but using synchronized methods in a single thread is overkill.

That's pretty much about it.

Quote from StringBuilder API:

This class [StringBuilder] provides an API compatible with StringBuffer, but with no guarantee of synchronization. This class is designed for use as a drop-in replacement for StringBuffer in places where the string buffer was being used by a single thread (as is generally the case). Where possible, it is recommended that this class be used in preference to StringBuffer as it will be faster under most implementations.

So it was made to substitute it.

The same happened with Vector and ArrayList.

share|improve this answer
add comment

But needed to get the clear difference with the help of an example?

StringBuffer or StringBuilder

Simply use StringBuilder unless you really are trying to share a buffer between threads. StringBuilder is the unsynchronized (less overhead = more efficient) younger brother of the original synchronized StringBuffer class.

StringBuffer came first. Sun was concerned with correctness under all conditions, so they made it synchronized to make it thread-safe just in case.

StringBuilder came later. Most of the uses of StringBuffer were single-thread and unnecessarily paying the cost of the synchronization.

Since StringBuilder is a drop-in replacement for StringBuffer without the synchronization, there would not be differences between any examples.

If you are trying to share between threads, you can use StringBuffer, but consider whether higher-level synchronization is necessary, e.g. perhaps instead of using StringBuffer, should you synchronize the methods that use the StringBuilder.

share|improve this answer
2  
little better explanation than others over here... :) –  agpt Aug 27 '13 at 5:09
add comment

StringBuilder was introduced in Java 1.5 so it won't work with earlier JVMs.

From the Javadocs:

StringBuilder class provides an API compatible with StringBuffer, but with no guarantee of synchronization. This class is designed for use as a drop-in replacement for StringBuffer in places where the string buffer was being used by a single thread (as is generally the case). Where possible, it is recommended that this class be used in preference to StringBuffer as it will be faster under most implementations.

share|improve this answer
11  
1.4 is at its End of Service Life, so it hardly seem worth worrying about pre-1.5. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 14 '08 at 17:15
    
@tomHawtin-tackline not necessarily - there are enterprise products out there on pre 1.4 that most of us use daily. Also BlackBerry java is based on 1.4 and that is still very current. –  Richard Le Mesurier Mar 13 '13 at 8:47
    
And CDC and CLDC don't have StringBuilder. –  Jin Kwon Jul 12 '13 at 3:47
add comment

In single threads, a StringBuffer is not that much slower than a StringBuilder, thanks to JVM optimisations. In multithreading, you can't use safely a StringBuilder.

Here is my test :

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String withString ="";
    long t0 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (int i = 0 ; i < 100000; i++){
        withString+="some string"+i+" ; ";
    }
    System.out.println("strings:" + (System.currentTimeMillis() - t0));

    t0 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    StringBuffer buf = new StringBuffer();
    for (int i = 0 ; i < 100000; i++){
        buf.append("some string");
    }
    System.out.println("Buffers : "+(System.currentTimeMillis() - t0));

    t0 = System.currentTimeMillis();
    StringBuilder building = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0 ; i < 100000; i++){
        building.append("some string");
    }
    System.out.println("Builder : "+(System.currentTimeMillis() - t0));
}

Results :
strings: 319740
Buffers : 23
Builder : 7 !

So Builders are faster than Buffers, and WAY faster than strings concatenation. Now let's use an Executor for multiple threads :

public class StringsPerf {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ThreadPoolExecutor executorService = (ThreadPoolExecutor) Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
        //With Buffer
        StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();
        for (int i = 0 ; i < 10; i++){
            executorService.execute(new AppendableRunnable(buffer));
        }
        shutdownAndAwaitTermination(executorService);
        System.out.println(" Thread Buffer : "+ AppendableRunnable.time);

        //With Builder
        AppendableRunnable.time = 0;
        executorService = (ThreadPoolExecutor) Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for (int i = 0 ; i < 10; i++){
            executorService.execute(new AppendableRunnable(builder));
        }
        shutdownAndAwaitTermination(executorService);
        System.out.println(" Thread Builder: "+ AppendableRunnable.time);

    }

   static void shutdownAndAwaitTermination(ExecutorService pool) {
        pool.shutdown(); // code reduced from Official Javadoc for Executors
        try {
            if (!pool.awaitTermination(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS)) {
                pool.shutdownNow();
                if (!pool.awaitTermination(60, TimeUnit.SECONDS))
                    System.err.println("Pool did not terminate");
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {}
    }
}

class AppendableRunnable<T extends Appendable> implements Runnable {

    static long time = 0;
    T appendable;
    public AppendableRunnable(T appendable){
        this.appendable = appendable;
    }

    @Override
    public void run(){
        long t0 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (int j = 0 ; j < 10000 ; j++){
            try {
                appendable.append("some string");
            } catch (IOException e) {}
        }
        time+=(System.currentTimeMillis() - t0);
    }
}

Now StringBuffers take 157 ms for 100000 appends. It's not the same test, but compared to the previous 37 ms, you can safely assume that StringBuffers appends are slower with multithreading use. The reason is that the JIT/hotspot/compiler/something makes optimizations when it detects that there is no need for checking locks.

But with StringBuilder, you have java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException, because a concurrent thread tries to add something where it should not.

Conclusion is that you don't have to chase StringBuffers. And where you have threads, think about what they are doing, before trying to gain a few nanoseconds.

share|improve this answer
4  
You have forgotten to do "t0 = System.currentTimeMillis();" before doing StringBuilder test. So the figure displayed for StringBuilder is actually time it took to run stringbuffer AND stringbuilder test. Add this line and you'll see that StringBuilder IS faster about TWO TIMES. –  Gena Batsyan Sep 26 '13 at 9:51
    
Corrected, thanks. Obviously, it changes stuff. –  Nicolas Zozol Oct 27 '13 at 10:35
add comment

StringBuilder and StringBuffer are almost the same. The difference is that StringBuffer is synchronized and StringBuilder is not. Although, StringBuilder is faster than StringBuffer, the difference in performance is very little. StringBuilder is a SUN's replacement of StringBuffer. It just avoids synchronization from all the public methods. Rather than that, their functionality is the same.

Example of good usage:

If your text is going to change and is used by multiple threads, then it is better to use StringBuffer. If your text is going to change but is used by a single thread, then use StringBuilder.

share|improve this answer
add comment

First lets see the similarities: Both StringBuilder and StringBuffer are mutable. That means you can change the content of them, with in the same location.

Differences: StringBuffer is mutable and synchronized as well. Where as StringBuilder is mutable but not synchronized by default.

Meaning of synchronized (synchronization): When some thing is synchronized, then multiple threads can access, and modify it with out any problem or side effect. StringBuffer is synchronized, so you can use it with multiple threads with out any problem.

Which one to use when? StringBuider : When you need a string, which can be modifiable, and only one thread is accessing and modifying it. StringBuffer : When you need a string, which can be modifiable, and multiple threads are accessing and modifying it.

Note : Don't use StringBuffer unnecessarily. Means, don't use it if only one thread is modifying and accessing it. Because it has lot of locking and unlocking code for synchronization which will un necessarily take up CPU time. Don't use locks unless it is required.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just want to mention that StringBuffer's INDIVIDUAL method calls are thread-safe. But if you have multiple lines of code, use a synchronized code block to guarantee thread-safety, with some lock/monitor (as per usual...). Basically, don't just assume that using a thread-safe library immediately guarantees thread-safety in YOUR program! –  kevinze Mar 14 at 18:39
add comment

StringBuilder is not thread safe. String Buffer is. More info here.

EDIT: As for performance , after hotspot kicks in , StringBuilder is the winner. However , for small iterations , the performance difference is negligible.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The javadoc explains the difference:

This class provides an API compatible with StringBuffer, but with no guarantee of synchronization. This class is designed for use as a drop-in replacement for StringBuffer in places where the string buffer was being used by a single thread (as is generally the case). Where possible, it is recommended that this class be used in preference to StringBuffer as it will be faster under most implementations.

share|improve this answer
add comment

StringBuffer - Synchronized hence threadsafe - thread safe hence slow -

StringBuilder - Introduced in java 5.0 - Asynchronous hence fast & efficient - User explicitly need to synchronized it, if he wants - You can replace it will StringBuilder without a any other change

share|improve this answer
add comment

StringBuilder (introduced in Java 5) is identical to StringBuffer, except its methods are not synchronized. This means it has better performance than the latter, but the drawback is that it is not thread-safe.

Read http://leepoint.net/notes-java/data/strings/23stringbufferetc.html for more details

share|improve this answer
add comment

The Difference i have noticed are :

StringBuffer is  synchronized
StringBuffer is  thread-safe
StringBuffer is  slow (try to write a sample program and execute it, it will take more time than StringBuilder)


StringBuilder is not synchronized
StringBuilder is not thread-safe
StringBuilder performance is better than StringBuffer.


Common thing : Both have same methods with same signatures. Both are mutable.
share|improve this answer
add comment

Better use StringBuilder since it is not synchronized and therefor better performance. StringBuilder is a drop-in replacement of the older StringBuffer.

share|improve this answer
3  
Unless your application is multithreaded, of course. :) –  Mark McKenna Jan 25 '11 at 12:23
3  
@Mark true but most of the time the StringBu(ff|ild)er is a local variable used only by a single thread. –  gabuzo Jan 25 '11 at 12:25
    
@MarkMcKenna: Even in a multi-threaded application, one would often either have to use external locking, or do extra work to avoid it. For example, if two threads each wish to append a record containing multiple strings to a stringbuilder, they would have to aggregate the data to be added and then add it as a unit even if it would have been faster--absent threading issues--to simply perform a sequence of discrete append operations. –  supercat Mar 13 at 15:54
    
@supercat true dat. –  Mark McKenna Mar 13 at 16:36
add comment

StringBuffer is synchronized, but StringBuilder is not. As a result, StringBuilder is faster than StringBuffer.

share|improve this answer
add comment

StringBuffer is used to store character strings that will be changed (String objects cannot be changed). It automatically expands as needed. Related classes: String, CharSequence.

StringBuilder was added in Java 5. It is identical in all respects to StringBuffer except that it is not synchronized, which means that if multiple threads are accessing it at the same time, there could be trouble. For single-threaded programs, the most common case, avoiding the overhead of synchronization makes the StringBuilder very slightly faster.

share|improve this answer
2  
Single-threaded programs are not the most common case in Java, but StringBuilder‍s are usually local to a method, where they are visible to only one thread. –  finnw Jan 25 '11 at 14:36
add comment

String is an immutable object which means the value cannot be changed where as StringBuffer is mutable.

The StringBuffer is Synchronized hence thread safe where as StringBuilder is not and suitable for only single threaded instances.

share|improve this answer
    
just because StringBuffer has synchronized code, doesn't necessarily mean that StringBuffer is threadsafe. Consider the following example: StringBuffer testingBuffer = "stackoverflow"; Now Thread-1 is trying to append "1" to testingBuffer, and Thread-2 is trying to append "2" to testingBuffer. Now even though append() method is synchronized, u cannot be sure whether the value of testingBuffer will be "stackoverflow12" or "stackoverflow21". Actually, it is advised by Oracle to use stringbuilder over stringbuffer. I hope this helped :) –  Biman Tripathy Dec 25 '12 at 21:29
add comment

Every method present in StringBuffer is Synchronized. hence at a time only one thread is allowed to operate StringBuffer object. It Increases waiting time of a Thread and Creates Performance problems to overcome this problem SUN People intoduced StringBuilder in 1.5 version.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This link will make you understand the concepts of not only StringBuilder and StringBuffer but also their association and difference with String class. This will make you understand when to use which class. http://www.acquireandinspire.org/2013/01/string-string-builder-string-buffer.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

A simple program illustrating the difference between StringBuffer and StringBuilder:

/**
 * Run this program a couple of times. We see that the StringBuilder does not
 * give us reliable results because its methods are not thread-safe as compared
 * to StringBuffer.
 * 
 * For example, the single append in StringBuffer is thread-safe, i.e.
 * only one thread can call append() at any time and would finish writing
 * back to memory one at a time. In contrast, the append() in the StringBuilder 
 * class can be called concurrently by many threads, so the final size of the 
 * StringBuilder is sometimes less than expected.
 * 
 */
public class StringBufferVSStringBuilder {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

        int n = 10; 

        //*************************String Builder Test*******************************//
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        StringBuilderTest[] builderThreads = new StringBuilderTest[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            builderThreads[i] = new StringBuilderTest(sb);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            builderThreads[i].start();
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            builderThreads[i].join();
        }
        System.out.println("StringBuilderTest: Expected result is 1000; got " + sb.length());

        //*************************String Buffer Test*******************************//

        StringBuffer sb2 = new StringBuffer();
        StringBufferTest[] bufferThreads = new StringBufferTest[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            bufferThreads[i] = new StringBufferTest(sb2);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            bufferThreads[i].start();
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            bufferThreads[i].join();
        }
        System.out.println("StringBufferTest: Expected result is 1000; got " + sb2.length());

    }

}

// Every run would attempt to append 100 "A"s to the StringBuilder.
class StringBuilderTest extends Thread {

    StringBuilder sb;

    public StringBuilderTest (StringBuilder sb) {
        this.sb = sb;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            sb.append("A");
        }

    }
}


//Every run would attempt to append 100 "A"s to the StringBuffer.
class StringBufferTest extends Thread {

    StringBuffer sb2;

    public StringBufferTest (StringBuffer sb2) {
        this.sb2 = sb2;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            sb2.append("A");
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

String is a immutable , stringbuffer is a mutable, string builder also mutable but its not syncronized, StringBuffer is a syncronized,

share|improve this answer
add comment

Since StringBuffer is synchronized , it needs some extra effort , hence based on perforamance , its a bit slow than StringBuilder .

share|improve this answer
add comment

The major difference is StringBuffer is syncronized but StringBuilder is not.If you need to use more than one thread , then StringBuffer is recommended.But, as per the execution speed StringBuilder is faster than StringBuffer , because its not syncronized .

share|improve this answer
2  
StringBuffer is only thread safe if you perform just one operation on it. I wouldn't recommend using it in multiple thread because it is very hard to get right. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 17 '13 at 10:59
add comment

protected by Gilbert Le Blanc Jul 1 '13 at 13:58

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.