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What is the use of anonymous classes in java? Can we say that usage of anonymous class is one of the advantages of java?

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23  
It's not so much an advantage of Java as it is a way to work around the lack of closures in Java. –  Eric Wilson Sep 21 '12 at 11:53
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12 Answers 12

up vote 127 down vote accepted

By an "anonymous class", I take it you mean anonymous inner class.

An anonymous inner class can come useful when making an instance of an object which certain "extras" such as overloading methods, without having to actually subclass a class.

I tend to use it as a shortcut for attaching an event listener:

button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
    {
        // do something.
    }
});

Using this method makes coding a little bit quicker, as I don't need to make an extra class that implements ActionListener -- I can just instantiate an anonymous inner class without actually making a separate class.

I only use this technique for "quick and dirty" tasks where making an entire class feels unnecessary. Having multiple anonymous inner classes that do exactly the same thing should be refactored to an actual class, be it an inner class or a separate class.

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3  
Or you could refactor duplicate anonymous inner classes into one method with the anonymous inner class (and possibly some other duplicated code). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 14 '08 at 17:13
11  
You know...for that past 3 days I've been reading and rereading the official Java tutorials over, and over and over again to try and understand the whole Anonymous Inner Class thing. You accomplished in roughly 3 paragraphs what 4 pages from the creators of the language couldn't. Thank you sooooo much. –  AbeLinkon Apr 14 '13 at 2:37
    
Great answer but a quick question. Does it mean Java can live without anonymous inner classes and they are like extra option to pick from? –  PK' Feb 23 at 20:37
1  
Very well explained, even tough I would suggest anyone reading this to look up and see what java 8 and lambda expressions can do to make coding quicker and more readable. –  Pievis Mar 27 at 20:26
    
@user2190639 Precisely, can't ask for better with Lambda in Java8 –  bonCodigo May 5 at 23:39
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Anonymous inner classes are effectively closures, so they can be used to emulate lambda expressions or "delegates". For example, take this interface:

public interface F<A, B> {
   B f(A a);
}

You can use this anonymously to create a first-class function in Java. Let's say you have the following method that returns the first number larger than i in the given list, or i if no number is larger:

public static int larger(final List<Integer> ns, final int i) {
  for (Integer n : ns)
     if (n > i)
        return n;
  return i;
}

And then you have another method that returns the first number smaller than i in the given list, or i if no number is smaller:

public static int smaller(final List<Integer> ns, final int i) {
   for (Integer n : ns)
      if (n < i)
         return n;
   return i;
}

These methods are almost identical. Using the first-class function type F, we can rewrite these into one method as follows:

public static <T> T firstMatch(final List<T> ts, final F<T, Boolean> f, T z) {
   for (T t : ts)
      if (f.f(t))
         return t;
   return z;
}

You can use an anonymous class to use the firstMatch method:

F<Integer, Boolean> greaterThanTen = new F<Integer, Boolean> {
   Boolean f(final Integer n) {
      return n > 10;
   }
};
int moreThanMyFingersCanCount = firstMatch(xs, greaterThanTen, x);

This is a really contrived example, but its easy to see that being able to pass functions around as if they were values is a pretty useful feature. See "Can Your Programming Language Do This" by Joel himself.

A nice library for programming Java in this style: Functional Java.

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11  
unfortunately, the verbosity of doing functional programming in java, IMHO, outweights its gains - one of the striking points of functional programming is that it tends to reduce code size, and makes things easier to read and modify. But functional java doesnt seem to do that at all. –  Chii Dec 10 '08 at 8:49
15  
All the understandability of functional programming, with the terseness of Java! –  Adam Jaskiewicz Dec 10 '08 at 13:37
2  
In my experience, functional style in Java is paid for with verbosity up front, but it yields brevity in the long run. For example, myList.map(f) is considerably less verbose than the corresponding for-loop. –  Apocalisp Dec 10 '08 at 17:46
2  
Scala, a functional programming style language, purportedly runs well inside the JVM and may be an option for functional-programming scenarios. –  Darrell Teague Mar 4 '13 at 17:57
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They're commonly used as a verbose form of callback.

I suppose you could say they're an advantage compared to not having them, and having to create a named class every time, but similar concepts are implemented much better in other languages (as closures or blocks)

Here's a swing example

myButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        // do stuff here...
    }
});

Although it's still messily verbose, it's a lot better than forcing you to define a named class for every throw away listener like this (although depending on the situation and reuse, that may still be the better approach)

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Did you mean to say terse? If it would be verbose, the callback would stay separately, making it a bit bigger, and thus making it verbose. If you say that this is still verbose, what would be a terse form then? –  user3081519 Feb 12 at 2:16
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I use them sometimes as a syntax hack for Map instantiation:

Map map = new HashMap() {{
   put("key", "value");
}};

vs

Map map = new HashMap();
map.put("key", "value");

It saves some redundancy when doing a lot of put statements. However, I have also run into problems doing this when the parent class needs to be serialized via remoting.

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9  
To be clear, the first set of braces is the anonymous inner class (subclassing HashMap). The second set of braces is an instance initializer (rather than a static one) which then sets the values on your HashMap subclass. +1 for mentioning it, -1 for not spelling it out for the noobs. ;-D –  Spencer Kormos Dec 12 '08 at 3:19
2  
Read more about the double-brace syntax here. –  Martin Andersson Feb 18 '13 at 8:04
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You use it in situations where you need to create a class for a specific purpose inside another function, e.g., as a listener, as a runnable (to spawn a thread), etc.

The idea is that you call them from inside the code of a function so you never refer to them elsewhere, so you don't need to name them. The compiler just enumerates them.

They are essentially syntactic sugar, and should generally be moved elsewhere as they grow bigger.

I'm not sure if it is one of the advantages of Java, though if you do use them (and we all frequently use them, unfortunately), then you could argue that they are one.

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Anonymous inner class is used in following scenario:

1.)For Overriding(Sub classing) ,When class definition is not usable except current case:

class A{
   public void methodA() {
      System.out.println("methodA");
    }
}
class B{
    A a = new A() {
     public void methodA() {
        System.out.println("anonymous methodA");
     }
   };
}

2.)For implementing an interface,When implemention of interface is required only for current case:

interface interfaceA{
   public void methodA();
}
class B{
   interfaceA a = new interfaceA() {
     public void methodA() {
        System.out.println("anonymous methodA implementer");
     }
   };
}

3.)Argument Defined Anonymous inner class:

 interface Foo {
   void methodFoo();
 }
 class B{
  void do(Foo f) { }
}

class A{
   void methodA() {
     B b = new B();
     b.do(new Foo() {
       public void methodFoo() {
         System.out.println("methodFoo");
       } 
     });
   } 
 } 
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Great answer, looks like 3.) is the pattern used for event listeners –  xdl Apr 25 at 0:11
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Yes, anonymous inner classes is definitely one of the advantages of Java.

With an anonymous inner class you have access to final and member variables of the surrounding class, and that comes in handy in listeners etc.

But a major advantage is that the inner class code, which is (at least should be) tightly coupled to the surrounding class/method/block, has a specific context (the surrounding class, method, and block).

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Having access to the surrounding class is very important! I think this is the reason in many cases where anonymous class is used, because it needs/uses the non-public attributes, methods and local variables of the surrounding class/method which outherwise (if a separate class would be used) would have to be passed or published. –  icza Jul 11 at 12:06
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GuideLines for Anonymous Class.

  1. Anonymous class is declared and initialized simultaneously.

  2. Anonymous class must extend or implement to one and only one class or interface resp.

  3. As anonymouse class has no name, it can be used only once.

eg:

button.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){

            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    }
});
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Regarding #3: Not entirely true. You can acquire multiple instances of an anonymous class with reflection, e.g. ref.getClass().newInstance(). –  icza Jul 11 at 11:54
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            new Thread() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    sleep(300);
                } 
                catch (InterruptedException e)
                {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    System.out.println(" EXCEPTION : " + e.toString());
                }
                handler.post(mainloading);
            }
        }.start();

This is also one of the example for anonymous inner type using thread

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One of the major usage of anonymous classes in class-finalization which called finalizer guardian. In Java world using the finalize methods should be avoided until you really need them. You have to remember, when you override the finalize method for sub-classes, you should always invoke super.finalize() as well, because the finalize method of super class won't invoke automatically and you can have trouble with memory leaks.

so considering the fact mentioned above, you can just use the anonymous classes like:

public class HeavyClass{
    private final Object finalizerGuardian = new Object() {
        @Override
        protected void finalize() throws Throwable{
            //Finalize outer HeavyClass object
        }
    };
}

Using this technique you relieved yourself and your other developers to call super.finalize() on each sub-class of the HeavyClass which needs finalize method.

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i use anonymous objects for calling new Threads..

new Thread( 
new Runnable()
{
public void run()
{
you code
}
}).start();
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Anonymous inner class can be beneficial while giving different implementations for different objects. But should be used very sparingly as it creates problem for program readability.

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