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I am programming an iPhone app, and I need to force it to exit due to certain user actions. After cleaning up memory the app allocated, what's the appropriate method to call to terminate the application?

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20  
There is only one proper way - Home button.. –  beryllium Feb 21 '12 at 10:07
4  
The only situation I can imagine anyone considering to quit programmatically is the following scenario: App starts, displays terms of use, refusing to accept then quits the app. This is something brands sometimes pressure the developer to do. But it is wrong. –  Daniel Aug 27 '12 at 15:03
3  
@Daniel Normally you put your disclaimer/terms of use (EULA) on itunes connect when you upload the app. If the user downloads your app it means they have accepted your EULA –  Paul de Lange Dec 17 '12 at 9:51
1  
I don't understand why you would even need to quit the app. Even for something like the EULA within the app, just don't go to next page of the app until user taps the "accept Terms & Conditions" button, so they keep staring at the same page until they accept. Or do you want the comic answer ? Hasta la vista, baby! –  Zhang May 23 '13 at 13:17
1  
There are completely valid reasons for needing to force quit an ios app. My case is that I'm distributing pre-launch beta versions of my app. The beta versions open up all the IAP's for free. These have a time limit and need to expire after a few weeks. So I'm using the answer below to kill the app after the beta period is over. I'll remove this in the LIVE version. But still the answer helped me and is correct! –  badweasel Oct 9 '13 at 11:40

19 Answers 19

up vote 105 down vote accepted

Have you tried exit(0)?

Alternatively, [[NSThread mainThread] exit], although I have not tried that it seems like the more appropriate solution.

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2  
exit(0); worked like a charm, thanks for the quick response. –  user21293 Dec 10 '08 at 5:54
68  
As doing this is an Apple no-no (may cause your app to be refused in the app-store for non-standard interface), consider August's answer as "the right one." FYI, this answer (Brett's) is correct for ALL C programs, and NSThread for all Cocoa programs. –  Olie Dec 18 '08 at 20:57
12  
In Tech Q&A QA1561, Apple strongly discourages use of exit as it makes the app appear to have crashed. developer.apple.com/iphone/library/qa/qa2008/qa1561.html –  progrmr May 6 '10 at 12:47
6  
[[NSThread mainThread] exit] causes your application to crash, because exit is not an instance method. exit(0) will send the app to the background in iOS 4. Calling exit(0) again will crash it. At least in the simulator. –  Pumbaa80 Jul 6 '10 at 14:22
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This question is a good demonstration of the failure of SO's voting system: people downvoting an unquestionably correct answer, because they don't like the question it's answering. –  Glenn Maynard Aug 25 '13 at 20:54

On the iPhone there is no concept of quitting an app. The only action that should cause an app to quit is touching the Home button on the phone, and that's not something developers have access to.

According to Apple, your app should not terminate on its own. Since the user did not hit the Home button, any return to the Home screen gives the user the impression that your app crashed. This is confusing, non-standard behavior and should be avoided.

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10  
As I said, it's non-standard behavior and should be avoided. iPhone apps are not desktop apps. Don't treat them as such. –  August Dec 10 '08 at 17:13
15  
We have apps that helps people sleep. They want the app to terminate after a set period to reduce battery drain. I think this case is acceptable - as the user is hopefully asleep and can't exit the app manually. –  JamesSugrue May 9 '09 at 22:47
25  
I'd still disagree. When they wake up, the app is "gone" leaving the user to wonder what happened. Instead, set a timer in your app, then when the time is up, idle the app -- no activity. An app doing absolutely nothing won't drain the battery.The Springboard is an app, too -- it doesn't shut down just to save energy. Instead, it simply waits for user input. –  August May 10 '09 at 13:53
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@jdandrea: Customers have already implicitly accepted Apple's standard EULA or your clients' substitute EULA. I'd expect a rejection from Apple with a EULA dialog at app start-up. –  Steve Madsen Nov 5 '09 at 15:09
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@jdandrea Is this app a free app? If not, how do you return the money to those users who reject the "minimal EULA"? –  Andrew J. Brehm Aug 12 '10 at 10:46

Its not really a way to quit the program, but a way to force people to quit.

UIAlertView *anAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Hit Home Button to Exit" message:@"Tell em why they're quiting" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:nil otherButtonTitles:nil];
[anAlert show];
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1  
At least on the simulator, if you do this, the alert will still be there when the user re-opens the app. Thus, I suggest giving them at least one button. –  cheshirekow Aug 31 '12 at 15:16
    
Use Kalyan's answer so that app quits when home button is pressed. –  Timur Kuchkarov Feb 18 '13 at 16:27

Go to your info.plist and check the key "Application does not run in background". This time when the user clicks the home button, the application exits completely.

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But background process also get dismiss. –  Gajendra K Chauhan Jul 9 '13 at 11:28
    
"Application does not run in background"="YES" seems not working on iOS 6.0 and beyond. Any Idea? –  anonim Jul 14 '13 at 15:42
    
Tks man. I was getting crazy with no background state on home click. –  djserva Apr 28 at 12:46

Check the QA here.

http://developer.apple.com/iphone/library/qa/qa2008/qa1561.html

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1  
iOS developers must read. –  Gajendra K Chauhan Jul 9 '13 at 11:31
    
Just added an AlertView without buttons to comply with this. Easy. –  Schultz9999 Sep 8 '13 at 21:11

exit(0) appears to a user as crashes, so show a confirmation message to user. After confirmation suspend(home button press programmatically) and wait 2 seconds while app is going background with animation then exit behind user's view

-(IBAction)doExit
{
    //show confirmation message to user
    UIAlertView* alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Confirmation"
                                                 message:@"Do you want to exit?"
                                                delegate:self
                                       cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel"
                                       otherButtonTitles:@"OK", nil];
    [alert show];
}

-(void)alertView:(UIAlertView *)alertView clickedButtonAtIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex
{
    if (buttonIndex != 0)  // 0 == the cancel button
    {
        //home button press programmatically
        UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
        [app performSelector:@selector(suspend)];

        //wait 2 seconds while app is going background
        [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:2.0];

        //exit app when app is in background
        exit(0);
    }
}
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so I tried almost all solutions here and as far as I can say, this solution fits best for my case. Thank you for sharing! –  Tom Hert Jan 24 at 5:20
1  
Will apple approve this "exit(0)" ? Because some people says apple will reject your app when you use exit 0. –  Gajendra K Chauhan Jan 24 at 9:27
    
is selector@(suspend) acceptable in the app store? –  jeraldo Jun 16 at 9:14

After some tests, I can say the following:

  • using the private interface : [UIApplication sharedApplication] will cause the app looking like it crashed, BUT it will call - (void)applicationWillTerminate:(UIApplication *)application before doing so;
  • using exit(0); will also terminate the application, but it will look "normal" (the springboard's icons appears like expected, with the zoom out effect), BUT it won't call the - (void)applicationWillTerminate:(UIApplication *)application delegate method.

My advice:

  1. Manually call the - (void)applicationWillTerminate:(UIApplication *)application on the delegate.
  2. Call exit(0);.
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Apple says not to use exit due to "Applications calling exit will appear to the user to have crashed, rather than performing a graceful termination and animating back to the Home screen" developer.apple.com/library/ios/#qa/qa2008/qa1561.html –  Micky Duncan Sep 5 '12 at 22:20

add UIApplicationExitsOnSuspend property on application-info.plist to true

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Your ApplicationDelegate gets notified of intentional quitting by the user:

- (void)applicationWillResignActive:(UIApplication *)application {

When I get this notification I just call

        exit(0);

Which does all the work. And the best thing is, it is the useres intent to quit, which is why this should not be a problem calling it there.

On my Audio-App it was necessary to quit the app after people were syncing their device while the music was still playing. As soon as the syncing is complete I get a notification. But quitting the app right after that would actually look like a crash.

So instead I set a flag to REALLY quit the app on the next backgrounding action. Which is okay for refreshing the app after a sync.

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My App has been rejected recently bc I've used an undocumented method. Literally:

"Unfortunately it cannot be added to the App Store because it is using a private API. Use of non-public APIs, which as outlined in the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement section 3.3.1 is prohibited:

"3.3.1 Applications may only use Documented APIs in the manner prescribed by Apple and must not use or call any private APIs."

The non-public API that is included in your application is terminateWithSuccess"

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Hm, you may 'have to' quit the application if, say, your application requires an internet connection. You could display an alert and then do something like this:

if ([[UIApplication sharedApplication] respondsToSelector:@selector(terminate)]) {
    [[UIApplication sharedApplication] performSelector:@selector(terminate)];
} else {
    kill(getpid(), SIGINT); 
}
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9  
No, you don't have to terminate it. The iTunes app, for example, when it can't detect a proper connection simply puts up a screen that says they're not connected. It doesn't quit, it simply informs the user of what's going on. The user then quits by tapping the home button. –  August Dec 11 '08 at 14:52
    
The compass app quits if it's unable to function, though. –  Josh Lee Nov 5 '09 at 15:06

Apple say:

"Warning: Do not call the exit function. Applications calling exit will appear to the user to have crashed, rather than performing a graceful termination and animating back to the Home screen."

I think that this is a bad assumption. If the user tap a quit button and a message appears that say something like: "The application will now quit.", it doesn't appear to be crashed. Apple should provide a valid way to quit an application (not exit(0)).

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1  
They do it's call the Home button it can be located at the bottom of any iDevice. So because of this there is never any need to build your own quit button in. –  Popeye May 23 '13 at 15:15
- (IBAction)logOutButton:(id)sender
{
   //show confirmation message to user
   CustomAlert* alert = [[CustomAlert alloc] initWithTitle:@"Confirmation" message:@"Do you want  to exit?" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel" otherButtonTitles:@"OK", nil];
   alert.style = AlertStyleWhite;
   [alert setFontName:@"Helvetica" fontColor:[UIColor blackColor] fontShadowColor:[UIColor clearColor]];
   [alert show];
}
- (void)alertView:(UIAlertView *)alertView clickedButtonAtIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex
{

   if (buttonIndex != 0)  // 0 == the cancel button
   {
      //home button press programmatically
      UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
      [app performSelector:@selector(suspend)];
      //wait 2 seconds while app is going background
      [NSThread sleepForTimeInterval:2.0];
      //exit app when app is in background
      NSLog(@"exit(0)");
      exit(0);
  }
}
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In addition to the above, good, answer I just wanted to add, think about cleaning up your memory.

After your application exits, the iPhone OS will automatically clean up anything your application left behind, so freeing all memory manually can just increase the amount of time it takes your application to exit.

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Please modify your answer in current scenario of IOS4.0 and UP.. :P –  rptwsthi Apr 15 '11 at 5:35

This has gotten a good answer but decided to expand a bit:

You can't get your application accepted to AppStore without reading Apple's iOS Human Interface Guidelines well. (they retain the right to reject you for doing anything against them) The section "Don't Quit Programmatically" http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#DOCUMENTATION/UserExperience/Conceptual/MobileHIG/UEBestPractices/UEBestPractices.html is an exact guideline in how you should treat in this case.

If you ever have a problem with Apple platform you can't easily find a solution for, consult HIG. It's possible Apple simply doesn't want you to do it and they usually (I'm not Apple so I can't guarantee always) do say so in their documentation.

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The user should decide when an app exits. I don't think it is a good user interaction when an app quits. Therefore there is no nice API for it, only the home button has one.

If there is an error: Implement it better or Notify the user. If there have to be a restart: Implement it better of Notify the user.

It sounds dumb, but it's bad practice to exit the app without letting the user decide and not notifying him. And since there is a home button for the user interaction, Apple states, there should not be 2 things for the same function (exiting an app).

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Exit an app other way than the home button is really non-iOS-esque approach.

I did this helper, though, that use no private stuff:

void crash()
{ [[NSMutableArray new] addObject:NSStringFromClass(nil)]; }

But still not meant for production in my case. It is for testing crash reportings, or to fast restart after a Core Data reset. Just made it safe not to be rejected if function left in the production code.

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Exit an app other way

I did this helper, though, that use no private stuff:

Exit(0);

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[[UIApplication sharedApplication] terminateWithSuccess];

It worked fine and automatically calls - (void)applicationWillTerminateUIApplication *)application delegate.

to remove compile time warning add this code @interface UIApplication(MyExtras) - (void)terminateWithSuccess; @end

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1  
using this private API will get your app rejected... –  William Denniss Jun 26 '10 at 10:03
4  
This is a private method, Diego Mercado has explained above that his app got rejected, then why take such a risk. –  RVN Oct 15 '10 at 9:02
    
Use private API will get the app rejected by Apple. –  ZuYuan Nov 20 '12 at 12:52
    
for enterprise app - this can be a solution. –  user1140780 Mar 26 '13 at 14:08

protected by Brad Larson Jul 7 '11 at 18:10

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