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I have some clean up in a terminate_handler and it is possible to throw an exception. Do I need to worry about catching it to prevent recursive calls to the terminate_handler? With gcc, it seems this can't happen and we just go into abort. Is that true of the standard or is the behavior undefined?

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I don't think that this would be helpful as an answer, but is it possible to just not do anything that can throw an exception during this time? –  dash-tom-bang Aug 23 '10 at 23:10
    
In the terminate_handler I'm try to finish consuming some logging buffers. So long as the program is terminating, I might as well see what I can get out of the logging buffers. If it fails, it fails, but why not try? I was just worried about an large regress if the logger got into a state where it started throwing. –  pythonic metaphor Aug 23 '10 at 23:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A terminate handler is not allowed to return (§18.6.​3.1/2); it must end the program (the default handler calls abort()). If it consisted of:

void my_terminate()
{
    throw 5;
}

You'd get undefined behavior, because you would leave the function (because the exception propagates) without having terminated the program. So if you have code that could throw, make sure you catch all exceptions, like this:

void my_terminate()
{
    try
    {
        // stuff
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        // too bad
    }

    abort();
}

However (to answer the title question), I don't see anything that restricts it from being entered again, so this should be technically be fine:

void my_terminate()
{
    static int counter = 0;

    if (counter++ < 5)
        terminate();

    abort();
}
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std::terminate -- probably the only place catch (...) is okay. +1 –  Billy ONeal Aug 24 '10 at 0:50

No, you cannot resume normal program flow from std::terminate. You can, however, throw a different exception from the unexpected function. Terminate does just that -- program execution terminates after it completes.

EDIT:

That said, you shouldn't be doing anything complicated in std::terminate -- if you're in terminate then things have blown up sufficiently that you should not be trying to continue -- and you shouldn't try to do things like allocate memory in std::terminate for the same reason -- what if the program is in there as a result of a low memory condition? There's nothing you can do about it there.

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I don't want to resume normal program flow. My handler might look like this void myTerminate(){ logger.consumeAll(); }. It's a last ditch attempt to log what's there. I was wondering what happens if Logger::consumeAll throws. –  pythonic metaphor Aug 23 '10 at 23:18
    
@Pythonic: Yes, I'm just doing a bad job of explaining what I meant. If that's what you're doing, as GMan says, if it throws you've got undefined behavior. –  Billy ONeal Aug 24 '10 at 0:51
    
@pythonic: Oh, and just because you don't want to resume normal program flow, does not mean that is not what you'd be doing in the event you threw from std::terminate ;) –  Billy ONeal Aug 24 '10 at 0:55
    
I didn't appreciate this last point until reading the responses! –  pythonic metaphor Aug 24 '10 at 14:26

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