Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I return an array of strings in an ANSI C program?

For example:

#include<stdio.h>

#define SIZE 10

char ** ReturnStringArray()
{
    //How to do this?
}

main()
{
    int i=0;

    //How to do here???

    char str ** = ReturnStringArray();

    for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++)
    {
        printf("%s", str[i]);
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could do the following. Error checking omitted for brevity

char** ReturnStringArray() {
  char** pArray = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)*SIZE);
  int i = 0;
  for ( i = 0; i < SIZE; i++ ) {
    pArray[i] = strdup("a string");
  }
  return pArray;
}

Note that you'd need to correspondingly free the returned memory.

Additionally in your printf call you'll likely want to include a \n in your string to ensure the buffer is flushed. Otherwise the strings will get queued and won't be immediately printed to the console.

char** str = ReturnStringArray();
for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++)
{
    printf("%s\n", str[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@JMSA added some printing code. –  JaredPar Aug 24 '10 at 0:38
    
You failed to fix up the code error hence my -1.... look at the line char str ** = ..... :P –  t0mm13b Aug 24 '10 at 0:43
    
@tommieb75 fixed –  JaredPar Aug 24 '10 at 0:48
    
reinstated +1 ;) good man! :) –  t0mm13b Aug 24 '10 at 0:55
2  
please don't cast the return of malloc in C, otherwise you wouldn't capture the lack of inclusion of the prototype –  Jens Gustedt Aug 24 '10 at 6:08

Do it this way

#include<stdio.h>

#define SIZE 10

char ** ReturnStringArray()
{
    //How to do this?
    char **strList = (char **)malloc(sizeof(char*) * SIZE);
    int i = 0;
    if (strList != NULL){
         for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++){
             strList[i] = (char *)malloc(SIZE * sizeof(char) + 1);
             if (strList[i] != NULL){
                sprintf(strList[i], "Foo%d", i);
             }
         }
    }
    return strList;
}

main()
{
    int i=0;

    //How to do here???

    char **str = ReturnStringArray();

    for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++)
    {
        printf("%s", str[i]);
    }
}
  • Problem 1: Your double pointer declaration was incorrect
  • Problem 2: You need to know the size of the string for each pointer in the double-pointer..
  • Problem 3: The onus is placed on you to free the memory when done with it..

The code sample above assumes that the maximum size of the string will not exceed the value of SIZE, i.e. 10 bytes in length...

Do not go beyond the boundary of the double pointer as it will crash

share|improve this answer
    
I have done the same thing. But in main() I am writing:- for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++) { printf("%s",ReturnStringArray()[i]); }. This is because, writing char **str = ReturnStringArray(); for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++) { printf("%s", str[i]); } is not working. Can you say why? I am using VC++ 2008. –  BROY Aug 24 '10 at 0:31
    
@JMSA: for(i=0 ; i<SIZE ; i++) { printf("%s",ReturnStringArray()[i]); } - that code is illegal, and does not work...that is, a function with array subscripts which is not the right way :) –  t0mm13b Aug 24 '10 at 0:45

pls dont typecast the return of malloc, you have not included <stdlib.h> and as someone pointed out above lack of prototype will result in int being casted to char **. Accidently your program may or may not work at all.

share|improve this answer
    
But the question doesn't even use malloc ? This doesn't seem to answer the question at all. –  Charles Bailey Aug 30 '10 at 7:40
    
my bad, my reference was to tommieb post. –  cyber_raj Aug 30 '10 at 15:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.