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Why does List<T>.IndexOf allow out-of-range start index?

var list = new List<int>() { 100 };
Console.WriteLine(list.IndexOf(1/*item*/, 1/*start index*/));

There will not be any exceptions. But there is no item with 1 index in this collection! There is just one item with 0 index. So, why does .Net allow you to do it?

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2  
What exactly is output to the console form this code? – Logarr Feb 20 at 21:18
    
There is legal output: -1 It means there is no such element in specified range – Rustam Salahutdinov Feb 20 at 21:19
    
If you try index 2 it would throw an exception. – Yacoub Massad Feb 20 at 21:21
2  
Looks like special case for List.Length, MSDN states that 0 can be used with empty list – csharpfolk Feb 20 at 21:22
4  
@JeroenVannevel he's asking why its not throwing a run-time exception – Meirion Hughes Feb 20 at 21:34

First of all, if someone should take care of an invalid input it's the runtime and not the compiler since the input is of the same valid type (int).

With that said, actually, seeing the source code of IndexOf making it seem like an implementation bug:

[__DynamicallyInvokable]
public int IndexOf(T item, int index)
{
    if (index > this._size)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException(ExceptionArgument.index, ExceptionResource.ArgumentOutOfRange_Index);
    }
    return Array.IndexOf<T>(this._items, item, index, this._size - index);
}

As you can see, it was intended to not allow you to insert an invalid index which is bigger than the size of the list, but the comparison is done with > instead of >=.

  • The following code returns 0:

    var list = new List<int>() { 100 };
    Console.WriteLine(list.IndexOf(100/*item*/, 0/*start index*/));
    
  • The following code returns -1:

    var list = new List<int>() { 100 };
    Console.WriteLine(list.IndexOf(100/*item*/, 1/*start index*/));
    
  • While The following code throws an Exception:

    var list = new List<int>() { 100 };
    Console.WriteLine(list.IndexOf(100/*item*/, 2/*start index*/));
    

There is no reason what so ever for the second and third cases to behave differently which makes it seem as a bug in the implementation of IndexOf.

Also, the documentation says:

ArgumentOutOfRangeException | index is outside the range of valid indexes for the List<T>.

Which as we have just seen is not what happening.

Note: the same behaviour happens with arrays:

int[] arr =  { 100 };

//Output: 0
Console.WriteLine(Array.IndexOf(arr, 100/*item*/, 0/*start index*/));

//Output: -1
Console.WriteLine(Array.IndexOf(arr, 100/*item*/, 1/*start index*/));

//Throws ArgumentOutOfRangeException
Console.WriteLine(Array.IndexOf(arr, 100/*item*/, 2/*start index*/));
share|improve this answer
    
...or it's just a design decision and not a bug as you are very quick to conclude. If the docs specifically state that 0 (== .Count) is valid for an empty list, it only makes sense to allow the same value as .Count for all lists. – Matti Virkkunen Feb 21 at 11:34
    
Give me a reasonable reason to allow size and throw on size + 1 when indexes are zero based. – Tamir Vered Feb 21 at 11:54
    
@Tamir see Ivan's answer for a very good reason to do so. – Lucas Trzesniewski Feb 21 at 12:31
    
It's an option, still the same result could be achieved by adding a validation to the for loop, still it is very minor reason to allow such an odd behavior... – Tamir Vered Feb 21 at 12:36
    
This is not odd behavior. You have array with 3 elements. If you start on index 0 you have skip 0 elements and there are 3 to go. If you start at 3 you have skip 3 elements and there are 0 to go. Why would you prohibit starting at the end of collection? – abc667 Feb 24 at 17:43

It allows it because someone decided this was OK, and that someone either wrote the spec or implemented the method.

It is also somewhat documented in List(T).IndexOf Method:

0 (zero) is valid in an empty list.

(which I also take that Count is a valid start index for any list)

Note that the same thing is documented, but slightly better documented, for Array.IndexOf Method:

If startIndex equals Array.Length, the method returns -1. If startIndex is greater than Array.Length, the method throws an ArgumentOutOfRangeException.

Let me clarify my answer here.

You're asking "Why does this method allow this input".

The only legal reason is "Because someone implemented the method so that it did".

Is it a bug? It may very well be. The documentation only says that 0 is legal start index for an empty list, it does not directly say that 1 is legal or not for a list with a single element in it. The exception documentation for the method seems to contradict this (as has been brought up in comments) which seems to be in favor of it being a bug.

But the only reason for "why does it do this" is that someone actually implemented the method that way. It may be a conscious choice, it may be a bug, it may be an oversight either in the code or in the documentation.

The only one that can tell which one it is would be the person or people that implemented this method.

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The behaviour for a general List<T> size actually contradicts the documentation (look at my answer). – Tamir Vered Feb 20 at 21:31
    
The documentation does not say what happens if start index is equal to the length of a non-empty list, so I would tend to disagree. – Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 20 at 21:32
1  
It clearly says it: ArgumentOutOfRangeException | index is outside the range of valid indexes for the List<T> – Tamir Vered Feb 20 at 21:32
1  
Yet it also says that 0 is legal for an empty list, which is not a legal index for an empty list. I'm not saying any of this makes sense. – Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 20 at 21:32
    
It looks like no realisation error. So someone maded this decision, but does anyone know why? – Rustam Salahutdinov Feb 20 at 21:35

Of course the only one who can say for sure why is this are the people that made that decision.

The only logical reason I see (and that's my guess) is to allow usage like this

for (int index = list.IndexOf(value); index >= 0; index = list.IndexOf(value, index + 1))
{
    // do something
}

or in other words, to be able to restart safely the search from the next index of the last successful search.

This might not look a very common scenario, but is typical pattern when processing strings (for instance when one want to avoid Split). Which reminds me that String.IndexOf has the same behavior and is a bit better documented (although without specifying the reason):

The startIndex parameter can range from 0 to the length of the string instance. If startIndex equals the length of the string instance, the method returns -1.

To resume, since Array, string and List<T> share the same behavior, apparently it's intended and definitely not an implementation bug.

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To understand what's happening we can take a look at the sources:

public int IndexOf(T item, int index) {
    if (index > _size)
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException(ExceptionArgument.index, ExceptionResource.ArgumentOutOfRange_Index);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<int>() >= -1);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<int>() < Count);
    Contract.EndContractBlock();
    return Array.IndexOf(_items, item, index, _size - index);
}

_size here is equivalent to list.Count so when you have one item you can use an index of 1 even if it doesn't exist in the list.

Unless there is a special reason that I'm not seeing, this looks like a good old off-by-one error in the framework. The documentation even mentions that an exceptions should be thrown if

index is outside the range of valid indexes for the List<T>.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think, I understand why. It's kind of easier whay of realisation of methods like this. Look:

public int IndexOf(T item, int index)
{
    if (index > this._size)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException(ExceptionArgument.index, ExceptionResource.ArgumentOutOfRange_Index);
    }
    return Array.IndexOf<T>(this._items, item, index, this._size - index);
}

This method overload use another, more common, overload:

return Array.IndexOf<T>(this._items, item, index, this._size - index);

So this method also use it:

public int IndexOf(T item)

So it doens't make sence if this code:

var list = new List<int>(); /*empty!*/
Console.WriteLine(list.IndexOf(1/*item*/));

will throw an Exception . But there is no way to use this overload of IndexOf using common overload without this admission.

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