Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to declare a struct that is dependent upon another struct. I want to use sizeof to be safe/pedantic.

typedef struct _parent
{
  float calc ;
  char text[255] ;
  int used ;
} parent_t ;

Now I want to declare a struct child_t that has the same size as parent_t.text.

How can I do this? (Pseudo-code below.)

typedef struct _child
{
  char flag ;
  char text[sizeof(parent_t.text)] ;
  int used ;
} child_t ;

I tried a few different ways with parent_t and struct _parent, but my compiler will not accept.

As a trick, this seems to work:

parent_t* dummy ;
typedef struct _child
{
  char flag ;
  char text[sizeof(dummy->text)] ;
  int used ;
} child_t ;

Is it possible to declare child_t without the use of dummy?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 59 down vote accepted

Although defining the buffer size with a #define is one idiomatic way to do it, another would be to use a macro like this:

#define member_size(type, member) sizeof(((type *)0)->member)

and use it like this:

typedef struct
{
    float calc;
    char text[255];
    int used;
} Parent;

typedef struct
{
    char flag;
    char text[member_size(Parent, text)];
    int used;
} Child;

I'm actually a bit surprised that sizeof((type *)0)->member) is even allowed as a constant expression. Cool stuff.

share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, I didn't know sizeof((type *)0)->member) works. Am not on my dev machine now, but does this work for all the compilers? Thanks for that Joey. –  Gangadhar Aug 24 '10 at 5:03
1  
@Gangadhar: Yes, this works for all compilers. The operand of sizeof is not evaluated, so there is no issue with dereferencing the null pointer (because it isn't actually dereferenced). –  James McNellis Aug 24 '10 at 5:50
    
Wow! Many kudos for this wonderful gem :-) –  jweyrich Aug 24 '10 at 7:15
    
wonderful? its plain C89, see implementation of "offsetof" in <stddef.h> or the same implementation eetimes.com/design/other/4024941/… –  user411313 Aug 24 '10 at 7:35
    
@gordongekko: Thank you. Still a gem and wonderful for me. –  jweyrich Aug 24 '10 at 9:06

Use a preprocessor directive, i.e. #define:

#define TEXT_LEN 255

typedef struct _parent
{
  float calc ;
  char text[TEXT_LEN] ;
  int used ;
} parent_t ;

typedef struct _child
{
  char flag ;
  char text[TEXT_LEN] ;
  int used ;
} child_t ;
share|improve this answer
1  
simplest. don't make it complicated unless necessary. –  Nyan Aug 24 '10 at 12:18
    
Agree with Nyan. The other solutions work, but don't accomplish anything different. If you want to be more explicit, call it PARENT_TEXT_LEN or something equally descriptive. You can then also use it in conditionals throughout your code to prevent buffer length errors and it will be doing simple integer comparisons. –  dave mankoff Aug 24 '10 at 12:40
    
i think the advantage of the sizeof solution is that you don't need access to the parent struct, if it is defined in a library or somewhere else. –  user410344 Aug 24 '10 at 12:59
    
@evilclown: but you do: "char text[member_size(Parent, text)];" You need to reference the "Parent". –  dave mankoff Aug 24 '10 at 14:02
1  
i don't think you understood me. suppose the parent struct is drand48_data (defined in stdlib.h) and you want the sizeof __x. you cannot #define X_LEN 3 and change the stdlib.h, using member_size is superior when you don't have access to the source of the parent struct, which seems like a reasonable situation. –  user410344 Aug 25 '10 at 1:42

I am not on my development machine right now, but I think you can do one of the following:

sizeof(((parent_t *)0)->text)

sizeof(((parent_t){0}).text)


Edit: I like the member_size macro Joey suggested using this technique, I think I would use that.

share|improve this answer
    
Should be parent_t *, not _parent *. –  mkarasek Aug 24 '10 at 3:14
    
C99 feature!!!. –  Nyan Aug 24 '10 at 12:21
3  
The second form is very nice (and conceptually clean in that it does not involve null pointers), but you should mention that it's not possible in pre-C99 compilers. –  R.. Aug 25 '10 at 0:09

You can use a preprocessor directive for size as:

#define TEXT_MAX_SIZE 255

and use it in both parent and child.

share|improve this answer
    
yep, but it's not always an option: say, in linux /usr/include/bits/dirent.h the size of the d_name field (struct direct / dirent) is not defined as DIRSIZ any more but hard-coded; so sizeof() seems to be the only clean way to keep the dependency –  ジョージ Jan 21 '12 at 17:08

Another possibility would be to define a type. The fact that you want to ensure the same size for the two fields is an indicator that you have the same semantics for them, I think.

typedef char description[255];

and then have a field

description text;

in both of your types.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.