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Say I have a foreach loop.

I have to do something with the first object of the loop that I don't have to do with any of the other objects.

How do I check if the item that's currently in the loop is the first object.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

There are several ways that you could do that.

  1. Use a for loop instead
  2. Set a Boolean flag
  3. Use Linq to get the list.First() and then foreach over list.Skip(1)
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Something like this:

bool first = true;

foreach(var item in items)
{
    if (first)
    {
        item.firstStuff();
        first = false;
    }
    item.otherStuff();
}
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bool first = true;
foreach(var foo in bar)
{
  if (first)
  {
    // do something to your first item
    first = false;
  }
  // do something else to the rest
}
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grr, not quick enough! didn't see geofftnz's post. –  Hamza Aug 24 '10 at 3:25
    
it's the StackOverflow patented easy-question race :) –  geofftnz Aug 24 '10 at 3:32
    
well played sir, congrats :) –  Hamza Aug 24 '10 at 3:36

Can't think of anything but

var processedFirst = false;
foreach(var x in items) {
    if(!processedFirst) {
        ProcessFirst(x);
        processedFirst = true;
    }
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Here's a performant solution:

using (var erator = enumerable.GetEnumerator())
{
    if (erator.MoveNext())
    {
        DoActionOnFirst(erator.Current);

        while (erator.MoveNext())
            DoActionOnOther(erator.Current);
    }
}

EDIT: And here's a LINQ one:

if (enumerable.Any())
    {
        DoActionOnFirst(enumerable.First());

        foreach (var item in enumerable.Skip(1))
            DoActionOnOther(item);
    }

EDIT: If the actions on the items have signatures assignable to Func<TItem, TResult>, you can do:

enumerable.Select((item, index) => index == 0 ? GetResultFromFirstItem(item) : GetResultFromOtherItem(item));
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2  
While this technically satisfies the requirements, it is significantly less readable than using a 'first' flag to indicate as others have posted. –  Paul Alexander Aug 24 '10 at 3:28
    
@ Paul: It is more efficient, and I don't see why it is significantly less readable. –  Ani Aug 24 '10 at 3:31
    
Not sure how this is more efficient when compared to using a 'first' flag. –  Babar Aug 24 '10 at 5:50

try this one

bool IsFirst = true;

foreach(DataRow dr in dt.Rows)
{
    if (IsFirst)
    {
        // do some thing
        IsFirst = false;
    }    
}
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This is more of a general solution for getting index along with each object in an array. Should work testing if it's the first.

        List<String> entries = new List<string>();
        entries.Add("zero");
        entries.Add("one");
        entries.Add("two");

        Dictionary<int, String> numberedEntries = new Dictionary<int, string>();
        int i = 0;
        entries.ForEach(x => numberedEntries.Add(i++, x));
        foreach (KeyValuePair<int, String> pair in numberedEntries) {
            Console.WriteLine(pair.Key + ": " + pair.Value);
        }

In this setup, the Key of the KeyValuePair is the index and the value is the object at that index, in my example a string, but any object could be placed there. It adds a little overhead, but can be used to determine any object in the list's index when needed.

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Smells like Python's dict.__items__ I like it! –  Hovis Mar 6 '12 at 23:22

I like the Linq way, but without the Skip(1), this way you can also use it for the last item in a list and your code remains clean imho :)

foreach(var item in items)
{
    if (items.First()==item)
        item.firstStuff();

    else if (items.Last() == item)
        item.lastStuff();

    item.otherStuff();
}
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