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gcc 4.4.4 c89

However, I am having a problem trying to display all the animals.

I have the following code.

I am trying display all the animals in the array. So I have 3 array of pointers to char*. Then an array of pointers to these data sets.

I have tried to control the inner loop for checking for a -1 and a NULL for the outer.

void initialize_char_array()
{
    char *data_set1[] = {"dog", "cat", "bee", NULL};
    char *data_set2[] = {"rabbit", "ant", "snake", "rat", NULL};
    char *data_set3[] = {"cow", "lizard", "beaver", "bat", "hedgehog", NULL};

    char *ptr_char[] = {*data_set1, *data_set2, *data_set3, NULL};

    display_char_array(ptr_char);
}

void display_char_array(char **ptr_char)
{
    size_t inner = 0, outer = 0;

    for(outer = 0; ptr_char[outer] != NULL; outer++) {
        for(inner = 0; *ptr_char[inner] != -1; inner++) {
            printf("data [ %s ]\n", ptr_char[outer][inner]);
        }
    }
}

Many thanks for any suggestions,

share|improve this question
    
And your problem is? –  Daniel Daranas Aug 24 '10 at 7:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

*data_set1 is the same as data_set1[0]. Here's a fixed version of what you trying to do. IMHO it's matter of taste which are you using: index-variable or pointer-iterators in the loop, apparently compiler will generate the very same machine code.

// type of ptr_char changed
void display_char_array(char **ptr_char[])
{
    size_t inner = 0, outer = 0;

    for(outer = 0; ptr_char[outer] != NULL; outer++) {
        // check for NULL in inner loop!
        for(inner = 0; ptr_char[outer][inner] != NULL; inner++) {
            printf("data [ %s ]\n", ptr_char[outer][inner]);
        }
    }
}
void initialize_char_array()
{
    char *data_set1[] = {"dog", "cat", "bee", NULL};
    char *data_set2[] = {"rabbit", "ant", "snake", "rat", NULL};
    char *data_set3[] = {"cow", "lizard", "beaver", "bat", "hedgehog", NULL};

    // fixed
    char **ptr_char[] = {data_set1, data_set2, data_set3, NULL};

    display_char_array(ptr_char);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Much cleaner than what I did. Nice answer! –  PP. Aug 24 '10 at 7:38
    
Just wondering about the **ptr_char[]. Is that an array of pointers to pointers to char. I have never used something like that before. –  ant2009 Aug 24 '10 at 7:46
1  
@robUK - think of [] as another *. What is a char array[]? It's a pointer to an array of characters, equivalent to char *array. What is a char *array[]? It's an array of pointers to char, equivalent to char **array. What is char **array[]? (Well it's equivalent to char ***array!). –  PP. Aug 24 '10 at 8:12
    
@robUK: Yes. But you can still think it as a type of array of arrays to pointers to char (as it used that way). –  Oleg Grenrus Aug 24 '10 at 8:17
    
@PP: you should be careful when creating variables: char *foo = "bar"; and char foo[] = "bar" seems to be almost the same, but there's a difference. More about pointers and arrays: lysator.liu.se/c/c-faq/c-2.html –  Oleg Grenrus Aug 24 '10 at 8:26

Given the way your initialize_char_array function initializes the ptr_char array, you will never be able to display all the animals. You will only be able to display the first of each of your three lists. If you want to be able to access all of your animals, you should first define ptr_char as an array of pointers to char pointers: char **ptr_char[].

Then the display function should take a parameter of this type char *** as argument. Yes, that's 3 levels of indirection. Then, don't use size_t variables to loop in your arrays, use a char ** one, and a char *.

share|improve this answer

It might help to go over the types of each array. Remember that in most circumstances the type of an array expression is implicitly converted (decays) from N-element array of T to pointer to T, or T *1. In the cases of data_set1, data_set2, and data_set3, T is char *, so the expression data_set1 is implicitly converted from 4-element array of char * to pointer to char *, or char **. The same is true for the other two arrays, as shown in the table below:

Array        Type            Decays to
-----        ----            ---------
data_set1    char *[4]       char **
data_set2    char *[5]       char **
data_set3    char *[6]       char **

If you're creating an array of these expressions (which is what you appear to be trying to do), then the array declaration needs to be

char **ptr_char[] = {data_set1, data_set2, data_set3, NULL};

which gives us

Array        Type            Decays to
-----        ----            ---------
ptr_char     char **[4]      char ***

Thus, ptr_char is an array of pointers to pointers to char, or char **ptr_char[4]. When you pass ptr_char an an argument to the display function, it is again implicitly converted from type 4-element array of char ** to pointer to char **, or char ***.


1. The exceptions to this rule are when the array expression is an operand of either the sizeof or & (address-of) operators, or if the expression is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
Great explanation, very helpfull. –  ant2009 Aug 25 '10 at 9:23

I re-wrote your program after trying (unsuccessfully) to debug the version you wrote:

#include <stdio.h>

void display_char_array(char ***ptr_char)
{
    for ( ; *ptr_char != NULL; ptr_char++ ) {
        char **data_set;
        for ( data_set = *ptr_char; *data_set != NULL; data_set++ ) {
            printf("data [ %s ]\n", *data_set);
        }
    }
}

void initialize_char_array()
{
    char *data_set1[] = {"dog", "cat", "bee", NULL};
    char *data_set2[] = {"rabbit", "ant", "snake", "rat", NULL};
    char *data_set3[] = {"cow", "lizard", "beaver", "bat", "hedgehog", NULL};

    char **ptr_char[] = { data_set1, data_set2, data_set3, NULL };

    display_char_array(ptr_char);
}

int main( void )
{
    initialize_char_array();

    return 0;
}

Your version would segfault and your use of pointers was very confusing!

share|improve this answer
    
I was experimenting, and modifying the source code. The -1 once was a mistake. As I did the same program with integers. It should have been a NULL. –  ant2009 Aug 24 '10 at 7:47

the mistake is was the initialization of ptr_char only with the first element from data_set?, see below:

void initialize_char_array()
{
    char *data_set1[] = {"dog", "cat", "bee", NULL};
    char *data_set2[] = {"rabbit", "ant", "snake", "rat", NULL};
    char *data_set3[] = {"cow", "lizard", "beaver", "bat", "hedgehog", NULL};

    char **ptr_char[] = {data_set1, data_set2, data_set3, NULL};

    display_char_array(ptr_char);
}

void display_char_array(char ***p)
{
  while( *p )
  {
    while( **p )
    {
      puts(**p);
      ++*p;
    }
    ++p;
  }
}
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