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I have some code that looks like this and I'm unsure how to handle the part which will never get executed since a part of this code runs in infinite loop while waiting for connections and when I terminate the program, it exits from there only.

main(){

// do some stuff....

    while(1) {
        int newFD =
            accept(sockFD, (struct sockaddr *)&client_addr, &client_addr_size);
        if(newFD == -1) {
            std::cerr << "Error while Accepting on socket" << std::endl;
            continue;
        }

        if(!fork()) {

            close(sockFD); // close child's sockfd - not needed here

            // lalala do stuff send message here                

            close(newFD);  // finally close its newFD - message sent, no use 
            return 0;
        }
        close(newFD);  // close parent's newFD - no use here
    }

    // now execution never reaches here
    close(sockFD);      // so how to handle this?
    freeaddrinfo(res);  // and this?

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I let it as it is and I guess OS should take care of it? – oopaewem Feb 22 at 6:40
5  
For this case, I would like to hook in the termination signal and use that to cleanly exit the program. In general though, for code that is never executed, delete it. Let your version control keep track of the old dead code. – Niall Feb 22 at 6:41
1  
Is your question about how to handle closing the socket, or what to do with the code itself? – rhughes Feb 22 at 13:57
    
Maybe this is a bit simple, but can you just check for a really high number and close then? – DavidTheDev Feb 22 at 14:37
    
Why not change your return 0 to continue after closing newFD? – Rob Feb 23 at 6:00
up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can, and probably should add a exit handler if your code is to be used by other people or you yourself just want it cleaner. In your exit handler you can toggle a flag that makes the while() loop terminate. The following code will work 100% fine for this use case and is reliable and cross platform, but if you want to do more complicated things you should use proper thread safe OS specific functions or something like Boost or C++11

First declare two global variables, make them volatile so the compiler will always force us to read or write its actually memory value. If you we do not declare it volatile then it is possible the compiler can put its value in a register which will make this not work. With volatile set it will read the memory location on every loop and work correctly, even with multiple threads.

volatile bool bRunning=true;
volatile bool bFinished=false;

and instead of your while(1) {} loop, change it to this

while(bRunning)
{
    dostuff
}
bFinished=true;

In your exit handler simply set bRunning=false;

void ExitHandler()
{
    bRunning=false;
    while(bFinished==false) { Sleep(1); }
}

You didn't specify an operating system but it looks like you are Linux based, to set a handler on Linux you need this.

void ExitHandler(int s)
{
    bRunning=false;
}

int main()
{
    struct sigaction sigIntHandler;
    sigIntHandler.sa_handler = ExitHandler;
    sigemptyset(&sigIntHandler.sa_mask);
    sigIntHandler.sa_flags = 0;
    sigaction(SIGINT, &sigIntHandler, NULL);
    while(bRunning)
    {
        dostuff
    }
    ...error_handling...
}

And on Windows when you are a console app its the following.

BOOL WINAPI ConsoleHandler(DWORD CEvent)
{
    switch (CEvent)
    {
        case CTRL_C_EVENT:
        case CTRL_BREAK_EVENT:
        case CTRL_CLOSE_EVENT:
        case CTRL_LOGOFF_EVENT:
        case CTRL_SHUTDOWN_EVENT:
            bRunning = false;
            while (bFinished == false) Sleep(1);
            break;
    }
    return TRUE;
}

int main()
{
    SetConsoleCtrlHandler(ConsoleHandler, TRUE);
    while(bRunning()
    {
        dostuff
    }
    ...error_handling...
}

Notice the need to test and wait for bFinished here. If you don't do this on Windows your app may not have enough time to shutdown as the exit handler is called by a separate OS specific thread. On Linux this is not necessary and you need to exit from your handler for your main thread to continue.

Another thing to note is by default Windows only gives you ~5 seconds to shut down before it terminates you. This is unfortunate in many cases and if more time is needed you will need to change the registry setting (bad idea) or implement a service which has better hooks into such things. For your simple case it will be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
fork() in MS Windows? I don't think so. ;) – Ulrich Eckhardt Feb 22 at 7:01
4  
Hehe. I just added the Windows code because it is relevant for others who may search for this same answer but be on Windows instead. Hopefully it is useful! – Ryler Sturden Feb 22 at 7:02
4  
Don't (PHANDLER_ROUTINE)ConsoleHandler either, that's just asking for trouble. You shouldn't need a cast. Also, using volatile and hoping for the best isn't good either. Rather, use the Interlocked* family of functions. Lastly, isn't the control-C handler executed in the context of one of the existing threads? That would be fatal if you waited for exactly that thread to terminate then... – Ulrich Eckhardt Feb 22 at 7:05
    
You are right about the cast! Thanks for spotting. On Windows it is a separate thread, if you return from the Handler your app will terminate. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… "When a CTRL_CLOSE_EVENT signal is received, the control handler returns TRUE and the process terminates." I've tested this and it is this way at least from Windows Vista and up. – Ryler Sturden Feb 22 at 7:38
    
@UlrichEckhardt in regards to volatile bool it is perfectly fine for this use case, 100% trouble free. But you can do it other ways if you want. – Ryler Sturden Feb 22 at 7:42

For these things, the OS will take care of properly releasing the resources on shutdown. However, more generally, you still need to make sure that allocated resources don't pile up during program execution, even if they are reclaimed by the OS automatically, because such a resource leak will still influence behaviour and performance of your program.

Now, concerning the resources at hand, there's no reason not to treat them like all resources in C++. The accepted rule is to bind them to an object that will release them in their destructor, see also the RAII idiom. That way, even if at some later stage someone added a break statement the code would still behave correctly.

BTW: The more serious problem I see here is the lack of proper error handling in general.

share|improve this answer
3  
could you comment on 'error handling' part? I would love to improve my code based on your suggestions since I've never done this kind of work before. – Abhinav Gauniyal Feb 22 at 7:05
1  
Simple example: fork(). If you look at the manpage, there are three different groups of values it returns, but you only make a distinction between two of them. If fork() fails, I'd just throw std::runtime_error("fork() failed") as default error handling concept, so the fault doesn't go unnoticed. This also applies to other functions here, just read the according documentation to find out how they signal errors. You can also post your code for review on codereview.stackexchange.com to get further suggestions. – Ulrich Eckhardt Feb 22 at 7:12
    
@UlrichEckhardt makes good points and I recommend RAII for error handling as much as possible. You may want to look into ASIO for networking instead of raw socket functions as it will be going into the C++17 standard and allows your app to be cross platform with no more effort on your part. Windows sockets and Linux sockets have some differences which make porting more trouble than it needs to be! – Ryler Sturden Feb 22 at 7:53
    
@RylerSturden thanks for your suggestion. I would've definitely used it if my uni course wouldn't have made it mandatory to do this low level way. – Abhinav Gauniyal Feb 22 at 8:18
    
It is good to know the low level ways anyhow, that way you can truly appreciate good networking libraries. ;) You could wrap that code up into classes yourself, ie CSocket, and in the destructor gracefully handle closing the socket and whatever else you need to do. That way your own code is RAII. I think all network c++ programmers at some point have written a CSocket type class. ;) – Ryler Sturden Feb 22 at 9:15

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