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i'd like to know if it is possible to implement own language constructs (like lock or foreach) in C#?

The idea behind is that i want to mark start and end of a block of operations. instead of writing

startblock("blockname");
  blabla();
  andsoon();
endblock();

i'd like to write something like

block("blockname"){
  blabla();
  test();
}

thank you!

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1  
What should the semantics be in your sample? Many things can already expressed easily with existing language constructs and most of the time there is no need for adding something to the language. –  0xA3 Aug 24 '10 at 9:32
    
it is only for tracing. i want to trace a start message before a block of instructions and an end message after this block, so my trace viewer can group all the elements inside a block together. for example i trace a start-message called "calculate invoices" then do all the stuff and then trace an end message so the block gets closed. i dont want to use explicit "start" and "end" functions because people tend to forget one of these... –  Dominik Aug 24 '10 at 11:02
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

For which purpose do you need it? Just for clarity of writing and clean code? C# is not extensible language. With using you can achieve that nicely:

using (new Context("block name"))
{
    // do your staff here
}

class Context : IDisposable
{
    public Context(string name)
    {
        // init context
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        // finish work in context
    }
}
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No you can't. But there is kind of workaround using IDisposable. You can create a class which will represent block start in constructor and block end in Dispose. Then you wrap the code into using. More here:

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+1 Abusing IDisposable for marking code regions has worked very well for me. –  Pent Ploompuu Aug 24 '10 at 9:37
    
Quick question, IDisposable only works within the using block right, otherwise it will be called when garbage collected? –  Akash Kava Aug 24 '10 at 9:38
1  
@Akash - it doesn't force you to use the using block, so one can still forget to call Dispose(). Dispose() is unrelated to the GC - when an object is collected by the GC, Finalize()/~this() is called. –  Mark H Aug 24 '10 at 9:44
    
Yes, it's meant to be used with the using block. You can use it like this: using(startblock("name")){...} if startblock returns an IDisposable object. –  Pent Ploompuu Aug 24 '10 at 9:46
1  
@Akash - if you forget to call dispose, it is never called. A solution is to use the pattern of void Dispose(bool disposing), which gets called from both the Dispose() and Finalize() methods, and ensures that the object gets disposed by one or the other. (See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b1yfkh5e.aspx) –  Mark H Aug 24 '10 at 9:49
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Another option is passing a function to a handler.

private void block(string name, Action action)
{
    startblock(name);
    action();
    endblock();
}

Followed by:

block("blockname", () =>
                {
                    blabla();
                    test();
                });

Keep in mind, this may be an indication that you need an abstract class (or a regular base class), and allow overriding of that method.

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+1 you were quick, I was just typing same answer :) –  Akash Kava Aug 24 '10 at 9:33
    
@Akash Kava - not too quick. It took me quite a few minutes, I wanted to make sure it compiles :) –  Kobi Aug 24 '10 at 9:35
    
I think you mean startblock(name) –  Matt Ellen Aug 24 '10 at 9:36
    
@Matt - Corrected, Thanks! –  Kobi Aug 24 '10 at 9:37
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Nemerle provides constructs like this. It is not too dissimilar from C#.

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1  
NEmerle is very alive. We are working on Nemerle 2.0 now –  user67754 Aug 24 '10 at 12:17
    
@reverseblade: Good to know, seems most .NET langs are dying (like my IronScheme). C# must be sufficient :) –  leppie Aug 24 '10 at 12:27
1  
+1 I created a post that solved this exact problem in Nemerle. –  Jordão May 14 '11 at 19:54
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